Comodo Scam Alert

Started Mar 26, 2013 | Discussions
Jim Cockfield Forum Pro • Posts: 16,342
Comodo Scam Alert
6

I've been using Comodo's Firewall Product for a long time, as I loved it's Default Deny Protection so that it blocked any suspicious behavior from applicatoins.

I was using it in conjunction with Avira AntiVir Premium as an extra layer of protection, since Comodo provided a nice layer against Zero Day Malware.

But, after realizing just how good their default deny protection worked, I unintalled Avira, since the Comodo software was going to prevent any malware infection by itself.  IOW, it's really good software for that purpose.

For whatever reason, I did not see some of the issues reported by others here. For example, skyglider reported problems where Comodo wanted to use their tech support to solve them in this post

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51154474

I had never seen the Comodo AntiError Program running on my PC, and had never seen suggestions to use their tech support via GeekBuddy, as I reported in posts like this one:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51155641

So, to try and figure out why others were seeing that behavior, I reinstalled Comodo internet Security again.

I still dd not see that kind of behavior. So, I decided to deliberately start the AntiError software (under the Start Menu>All Programs>Comodo>Geek Buddy>AntiError to try and determine what others were reporting

Sure enough, that program reported that I have issues, and a screen popped up offering support.

I captured all of the screens showing what took place. But, IMO, it boils down to them trying to use scare tactics so that you'll use paid support to try and "fix" the issues that were supposedly detected.

I'm *very* angry about it, and I plan to supply all logs and screen capture to any law enforcement agency that will listen (FTC, etc.) , as I can't stand companies that use those types of tactics to try and extract money from users.

I've been a big fan of Comodo in the past, as I really like their default deny approach to preventing malware infections.

But, when a company like that decides to try and make money from unsuspecting users by using scare tactics, they're going to end up in my s*** list.

So, please accept my apologies for suggesting them to begin with. Yes, they have great software that can help you to prevent malware infection.

But, their tactics to make extra profit via their AntiError and Geek Buddy software are unforgivable in my book.

I'll probably publish more details later, as I made sure to capture screens of my online correspondence, and I'm shocked at Comodo representative's behavior.

That kind of thing is unforgivable in my book, no matter how good their AV software is.

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JimC
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(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 14,338
Re: Comodo Scam Alert

Jim Cockfield wrote:

But, their tactics to make extra profit via their AntiError and Geek Buddy software are unforgivable in my book.

Another one bites the dust!

I understand your anger. I too have been in situations where I recommended a vendor that turned to the dark side. I felt their actions damaged my honor and reputation. I was not happy and can understand how you must be feeling right now.

I don't run any resident AV software and don't have any specific recommendations. I do run some non-resident programs and really like MalwareBytes Anti Malware and Emsisoft.

On the firewall size, I ran Sphinx Windows 7 Firewall Control Free Edition for many years and loved it. So much so that I recently purchased their Plus version. See:

http://www.sphinx-soft.com/Vista/order.html

Sphinx deliver what is essentially a simple GUI. All of the real firewalling work is performed by Windows itself and it therefore very stable, robust, and well behaved. The performance is great too -- there's simply no perceptible impact at all.

Gerry Pasternack Veteran Member • Posts: 4,059
Thanks!

Thanks for your diligent follow up on this, and for your integrity in reporting the results.

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Gerry

OP Jim Cockfield Forum Pro • Posts: 16,342
too bad, as their software is great
2

It's too bad that Comodo decided to use those types of tactics to make money, as their software is great.

Bsaically, you're just not going to get a malware infection using it, because of it's default deny protection (blocking and/or sandboxing any software that isn't included in it's white list).

But, because of their tactics to try and extract money from users via their AntiError and GeekBuddy software using BS reasons,  I'm going to stop using their software immediately, and recommend that others do the same thing.

I'll also file complaints with enforcement agencies regarding those tactics, and supply them with logs and screen captures.

That's a shame, since the software is really good. But, when a company stoops that low to make more profit, that negates any good about it in my book.

As for other options, your mention of Emissoft is one solution.

They're currently using the BitDefender virus signatures (Emisoft partnered with them last year), and BitDefender is pretty good about detecting most malware.

But, BitDefender products have loads of performance related issues, that Emisofot does not seem to have right now, since Emisoft is using different scanning engine techniques (even though they use other vendor's virus databases).

So, it would be on option to consider. It's still going to let malware get through that Comodo would block (thanks to Comodo's defautlt deny prortection, even if a program is not recognized as malware). But, Emisoft would be better than most other products at preventing infection, thanks to a really good virus database (BitDefender's) combined with faster scanning techniques.

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JimC
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willvan Senior Member • Posts: 2,129
Re: Thanks!

Gerry Pasternack wrote:

Thanks for your diligent follow up on this, and for your integrity in reporting the results.

+1 from me as well Jim.  Good information but sad that Comondo would take such a step.  I am running Bitdefender and I know what you mean about performance issues as every so often I get the feeling that the program is not functioning properly as some of the normal alerts do not appear for several days and I find myself having to do a program repair.  Much more confident in Bitdefender though than McAfee which is provided free through my ISP.

Bill

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NewsyL
NewsyL Veteran Member • Posts: 5,751
Re: too bad, as their software is great

Jim Cockfield wrote:

As for other options, your mention of Emissoft is one solution.

They're currently using the BitDefender virus signatures (Emisoft partnered with them last year), and BitDefender is pretty good about detecting most malware.

But, BitDefender products have loads of performance related issues, that Emisofot does not seem to have right now, since Emisoft is using different scanning engine techniques (even though they use other vendor's virus databases).

So, it would be on option to consider. It's still going to let malware get through that Comodo would block (thanks to Comodo's defautlt deny prortection, even if a program is not recognized as malware). But, Emisoft would be better than most other products at preventing infection, thanks to a really good virus database (BitDefender's) combined with faster scanning techniques.

.

FYI... after my debacle with AVIRA Premium on my business laptop I've been trialing other brands of anti-malware the past 6 weeks.  I can't recall  that I posted it but I found that the Webguard function of AVIRA was bringing my 4 year old laptop to its' knees screaming for mercy.

I've tried....

Bitdefender.... bad experience; froze my laptop to the point that I had to remove the battery to recover.  Tried it a second time - same thing.

Fsecure.... after AVIRA it felt like my laptop was 3 times faster with Fsecure.  But it was too smooth and I almost felt that it was not working.  It's UI is missing some features I'd like to see but I may yet come back to this one.  Odd thing is that it is using the Bitdefender engine.

Emsisoft Anti-Malware.... 1 week in and not too bad.  Some web pages load slower than with Fsecure but I take this to be a sign that EAM is doing its' thing and is checking its' online database to ensure that it is a not a rogue page before it allows a connection.  Frequent updates of its' signatures, all 12,630,550 of them.  Also uses a component of the Bitdefender engine.

Btw... I'm using Emsisoft's Online Armour firewall.  I like seeing the pop-ups as it senses connection status.  Seems to forget authorizations every once in a while not related to updates.

.

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NorCor Forum Member • Posts: 85
Re: too bad, as their software is great
1

Exactly my experience after trying the software 2 months ago. Pay $$$ for un-needed help BS ploys. Malwarebytes paid edition started blocking all call-home programs example FF auto updates, iTunes etc, that started a 'looping-seeking' hard drive issue 'sounded like the click of deaf'...shut down Malwarebytes allowing all auto updates to occur resolved the issue.

Thanks for the heads up JIM!

Archer66 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,865
Trustworthy sources

I would suggest looking thru these reviews that you can really trust.

http://www.pcpro.co.uk/reviews/internet-security

Another good resource for security software is

http://www.wilderssecurity.com/

skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 6,025
Re: Comodo Scam Alert

Jim Cockfield wrote:

But, when a company like that decides to try and make money from unsuspecting users by using scare tactics, they're going to end up in my s*** list.

So, please accept my apologies for suggesting them to begin with. Yes, they have great software that can help you to prevent malware infection.

No problem.  I did a backup prior to installing Comodo so I'm going to restore my previous Win7 system.  (An advantage of keeping only the OS and programs on the C: drive.)

After doing a bit of research, I found that PC Magazine recommends AVG Free 2013 as their top free antivirus software for 2013.  I also found this youtube review of AVG Free 2013 by ThePCSecurity.  He infected his PC while running AVG Free 2013 and then ran MalwareBytes and HitManPro.  Both did not find any infections or malware so AVG Free 2013 detected them all.

I'm thinking about trying AVG Free 2013.  What's your thoughts on that antivirus software?

Sky

Donnydave New Member • Posts: 5
Re: Comodo Scam Alert

I just had a similar problem I saw the anti-error log on my desktop and decided to investigate I did not realise it was connected to geek buddy and Comodo. They said I had a serious problem and wanted me to phone them to sort it? but being deaf I declined? so they stayed on the chat window and said they would talk me through the fix, and told me it was a virus fault effecting my permissions? So I suggested a boot time scan? They came back with wanting to sell me a discounted plan over two or three years? I was always under the impression Geek Buddy was a free service with Comodo? I am doing a boot time scan just in case so my main computer is down for most of the day Grrr.

1w12q312qw1 Contributing Member • Posts: 732
Re: Comodo Scam Alert

Donnydave wrote:

I just had a similar problem I saw the anti-error log on my desktop and decided to investigate I did not realise it was connected to geek buddy and Comodo. They said I had a serious problem and wanted me to phone them to sort it? but being deaf I declined? so they stayed on the chat window and said they would talk me through the fix, and told me it was a virus fault effecting my permissions? So I suggested a boot time scan? They came back with wanting to sell me a discounted plan over two or three years? I was always under the impression Geek Buddy was a free service with Comodo? I am doing a boot time scan just in case so my main computer is down for most of the day Grrr.

About a year ago, our spare computer was really messed up, I knew I'd probably have to reinstall the OS. But I said, what-the-heck, let me call Microsoft tech-support, maybe I'd get lucky and they could help me at no cost. I told the person the symptoms and he said he'd transfer me to someone who could help:

http://www.mytechgurus.com

I thought MS wouldn't refer me to a scam company. How wrong I was!!! They did a scan on my computer and came up with about 100 viruses and 1,000,000 other things wrong including a fatally corrupted registry. I said, OK, fix it. They said it would cost $150.00 for a one-time fix and they wanted me to go in on a monthly "scan & fix" for $250 for 12 months. OK, I'm not as dumb as i look, so I said I can't afford $150, let alone another $250, could they do the one-time-fix for $50? The fellow said he'd ask his boss and lo and behold he said they could. I had wasted enough time with this scam company, probably based in India but with a USA phone number, and I hung up and proceeded to reinstall the OS.

I don't know how these "worm" companies worked their way into Microsoft, maybe some kickbacks going on, but upon doing more research, there are tons of them waiting to prey on the PC-illiterate, disgusting really.

Stan

digitalshooter
digitalshooter Forum Pro • Posts: 19,604
Re: Comodo Update Frequency and update availability

SO I have this newly re-built machine that has the free comodo anti virus only, geekbuddy removed,  software on it.

I noticed yesterday when I started it, that it did not immediately update the anti virus like I am accustomed to.  (Machine was idle)  SO I manually did it.  You cannot schedule this is the free version that I could find, like I found online for their other pay for products..

Today I did the same thing but I also tried to find an answer online while letting the machine sit idle.  One answer that I found from a comodo forum tech was "at least once a day".  Really, so I began to look around and there were arguments about how it was not important how many times it checked, but how many updates comodo puts out daily.

I don't agree with the first and certainly agree with the second.  So I am wondering if the paid versions have the feature for you to set the frequency check times, what is the free version set to and are the paid versions being pushed virus updates sooner?

Mine set idle for 30 minutes this morning with no updates, indicated last updated a day ago. For me and for someone on an active machine, I think this is unacceptable.

I know this is a free software and I preach you get what you pay for, but an av software that has day old virus definitions and does not update immediately upon boot up, is unacceptable to me.

Thoughts?

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Thanks,
Digitalshooter
PS: all posts are just my opinion!

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digitalshooter
digitalshooter Forum Pro • Posts: 19,604
Comodo Getting removed sends ad pop up!

I just turned around after typing the above question and there was a pop up on the computer trying to sell me

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Thanks,
Digitalshooter
PS: all posts are just my opinion!

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1w12q312qw1 Contributing Member • Posts: 732
Re: Comodo Getting removed sends ad pop up!

digitalshooter wrote:

I just turned around after typing the above question and there was a pop up on the computer trying to sell me

GET RID OF IT!!!! And tell them why.

Don't these companies realize they are alienating their customers with this "hard" sell? I got rid of Avira because of their pushy tactics, too.

Stan

Scott Eaton Senior Member • Posts: 2,224
then don't use it
1

3rd party Software firewalls in my experience or the most poorly understood and over-rated 'security' products on the market. After watching Zone-Alarm leave a wake of Winsock destruction with botched upgrades a few years ago I really, really started to turn up the heat for 'amatuer' support people to stop pushing software firewalls other than the core Windows stuff.

Content filtering, real-time process scanning and legitimate Firewall functions are three inherently different things that software firewall proponents can't differentiate. If you don't know the difference between layer 4/5 and 7 perhaps you should study it.

I'm all for preventing bad things from getting on your computer, but I'm more for common sense. Unless your running the IT department of an Iranian power plant the last meaningful passively spread exploit worth talking about was 'Blaster' back around 2005. 'Zero Day' is something from Hollywood. Pretty much everything since requires the computer user to do something proactive, and frankly I'm wondering what you guys are doing to require all this outbound monitoring. Real computer people fix this with proper sandboxing and staying away from Bittorent software network.

I've lost count at the number of friends and relatives that ask me to fixed their infected machines while they're also running multiple freeware security programs. Meanwhile none of the banks or health networks I've worked for use Commodo or anything else in that software space. They lock their machines down with proper polices, use an adequate A/V defense, and keep 'crisis-ware' like Commodo or Zone-Alarm from sticking it's fingers in the network layer of the machine.

OP Jim Cockfield Forum Pro • Posts: 16,342
IOW, AVG got "lucky" with those samples

skyglider wrote:


After doing a bit of research, I found that PC Magazine recommends AVG Free 2013 as their top free antivirus software for 2013.  I also found this youtube review of AVG Free 2013 by ThePCSecurity.  He infected his PC while running AVG Free 2013 and then ran MalwareBytes and HitManPro.  Both did not find any infections or malware so AVG Free 2013 detected them all.

I'm thinking about trying AVG Free 2013.  What's your thoughts on that antivirus software?

AVG just got lucky for that particular test.

He uses the same technique that some of the other testers use, where he downloads some malware and sees how much of it is detected by a given product.

Then, he runs some of the malware that was not detected by a product, to see if it catches it on execution or not (even though the scans of the folder containing malware left some of it behind because the signature detection missed it).

That's a good way to see how AV software handles zero day threats (unknown malware that is not in it's signature database yet).

In that particular review, AVG got lucky, in that the malware set being used didn't get through upon execution.  But, it looks to me like very few of the samples he tried actually worked on the Windows version he was using; and the ones that did were blocked by some kind of identity theft module in AVG.   I'm assuming this is the review you're referring to:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XE0OmabXgk

But, if you look at some of the other similar reviews using different malware sets, it can miss malware upon execution.    This is a review of the beta version of their paid product by languy99, but you get the idea (lots of malware made it through AVG's defenses):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW7vCgjGslc

Here's one of a production (not beta) version of AVG 2013 Free by, and you'll see that it let malware infect the system:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHatO51YDp8

Here's another review using the same techniques.   It doesn't have any comments, but you can tell the reviewer is using the same methodology, and near the end of the review, you'll see lots of malware that AVG missed being detected by the other scanners used later.  Warning -- turn you volume down (as it's playing loud music throughout the tests). lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m862U9Yispg

IOW, the reviews by ThePCDoctor are one place to look to see how a product works.

But, sometimes the malware set he uses is not good enough to see how a product handles zero day malware (as in the test of AVG, where the product just got lucky).

So, I'd also look at tests by some of the others (languy99, malwaredoctor are two reviewers using similar techniques), to get a better idea of how a product works using more (and fresher) samples.

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JimC
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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 6,025
Re: IOW, AVG got "lucky" with those samples

Jim Cockfield wrote:

skyglider wrote:

After doing a bit of research, I found that PC Magazine recommends AVG Free 2013 as their top free antivirus software for 2013.  I also found this youtube review of AVG Free 2013 by ThePCSecurity.  He infected his PC while running AVG Free 2013 and then ran MalwareBytes and HitManPro.  Both did not find any infections or malware so AVG Free 2013 detected them all.

I'm thinking about trying AVG Free 2013.  What's your thoughts on that antivirus software?

AVG just got lucky for that particular test.
..... snip .....

After my post asking about AVG, I did more searching on youtube and found the reviews that you linked to.  I decided not to use AVG and your post now confirmed that.

After extensive youtube and web searching, I've come to the conclusion Comodo Free is one of the better "free" AV software and is, as you said many times before, better than MSE or MWD.

After my initial few days of Comodo's trying to scare me into calling their phone support (which I refused to do) and after uninstalling Comodo's GeekBuddy, I've not had any more AntiError popups.  Comodo is running silently now "so far".  So I decided to give it a chance and see what happens.  As long as Comodo doesn't popup "unsolicited" nag messages, I'm good with it.  If it does pop up nag messages I'll run away from it "real fast".

I've read where you bought EmsiSoft for $9.99 from newegg and saw a youtube review of EmsiSoft that was very favorable.  But the problem for me is that the subscription renewal fee after one year will jump backup to $40/year.

Instead of paying for a yearly AV subscription, I think a free AV software that has zero-day protection, plus either the free version of MalwareBytes or a paid for version of Malwarebytes Pro with realtime protection + scheduled scans will be sufficient for my protection.

The nice thing about Malwarebytes Pro is that the $24.95 charge is a one time only thing for life and not a yearly subscription fee.  Two copies for two computers can be purchased for $44.90.  I realize that the real-time protection of MalwareBytes Pro is not the best but that it does find the malware that its real-time protection missed, during its scans.

Jim, since you're pretty well versed on antivirus software, could you give me a list of which "free" antivirus software have zero-day protection?

Thanks,
Sky

OP Jim Cockfield Forum Pro • Posts: 16,342
there is no list, avoid Windows use

skyglider wrote:

Jim, since you're pretty well versed on antivirus software, could you give me a list of which "free" antivirus software have zero-day protection?

List, huh?

Most AV software has very poor zero day protection.  IOW, if it's virus signatures and/or heuristics don't catch malicious software, it's going to install and run.

I used Avira Antivir Premium (paid, not free version) for a long time, since the free version doesn't have web page analysis features like the paid version gives you.

But, I used it along with ThreatFire for better zero day protection, and later installed Comodo Firewall Software along with that combo, since I could set it's "Defense+" features to automatically block any unknown software from doing anything suspicious, unless I specifically approved that activity.

As I've mentioned in multiple posts about it, if "Joe's Exif Reader" is trying to modify something like registry entries related to communications settings, or "phone home", I'm going to want to know about it and block that behavior by default.

That's one of the areas I found that Comodo's products excelled in (so that even if it's signature detection missing a problem, it's default behavior blocker is not going to let anything that's not in it's list of known safe software infection your system, unless you specifically OK the program's behavior.

Now, because of it's "Default Deny Protection", Comodo's defense+ did result in more warnings and require more user intervention compared to most AV products. So, it got poor marks in usability because of that behavior in some reviews.

But, I'd rather have more warnings (even with software that's clean) than get a malware infection.  That's because *no* AV product (no matter how good it is at updating signatures to detect the latest threats) is going to catch everything.  So, I liked the way Comodo worked in that area.

Now, Comodo redesigned it's products with it's latest 6.x releases.  I personally preferred the older 5.x releases instead (even though they required more user intervention to allow a given app's behavior).  But, the 6.x releases are pretty good by default (using a Sandbox default for unknown malware that you can override if desired), without as much user intervention required.

Comodo's approach is better than any other product I've used for zero day protection against unknown malware.  You'll also find that some of the reputable reviewers of malware use Comodo Products for personal protection.

But, because they are now using GeekBuddy and related utilities like AntiError to try and increase revenue by taking advantage of unsuspecting users via BS errors, I no longer feel comfortable recommending their products (and thanks for pointing out that behavior, as I'd never seen it before).

So, I'm not sure what the best approach is now.   As mentioned, my current plan is to move to the Emsisosft AntiMalware software, since it's got components to analyze web pages you visit for threats, as well as behavior blockers for unknown threats, combined with really good detection of known threats (thanks to it's partnership with BitDefender to use their definitions in combination with Emsisoft's own malware database).

So, it should be fine for most purposes.  Just to add another layer of security, I'll use the free version of ThreatFire, too.  ThreatFire uses another layer of behavior analysis to block suspicious behavior. . I was using it for a long time along with Avira AntiVir Premium, even before switching to the Comodo Firewall products.

It's not perfect, but every little bit of extra protection helps in today's threat environment, since so much new malware is coming out every day now (over 70,000 new and unique samples being seen every day by many account).

IOW the malware writers are working to throw as much new malware as possible out, to try and overwhelm the AV companies so that signature based detection methods can't keep up with it; using malware producing toolkits that are designed to fool AV products because enough about the malware has changed so that it can avoid most signature based detection methods.

Unfortunately, that's the world we live in, and even many legit sites are compromised on a regular basis now.  For example, I was just reading an article about some of the NBC.com sites being compromised recently, with pages serving up malware to unprotected users (and the Emsisoft behavior blocker found it, too).

There is no one perfect solution, and being careful about the sites you visit is not good enough either, as legit sites are compromised on a regular basis anymore.

So, I'd install multiple levels of AV software that help to prevent threats based on behavior analysis, combined with good signature based detection.

Then, make sure you're running using an account without admin permissions.  With newer versions of Windows, just plug in "Standard User Account" (without the quotes) into a search box, and you'll find a link to set up an account without Admin permissions.  That can reduce the chance of malware installing without your permission.

Of course, make sure to keep your Operating System fully patched (for example, checking Windows Update frequently and installing any updates), as well as making sure your internet browsers and plugins are fully updated (as vulnerabilities are found on a regular basis that criminals will take advantage of if you don't keep them up to date)  Here's a good tool to help with that process (making sure your browser and plugins it uses are up to date):

https://browsercheck.qualys.com/

I also test any new software I want to install by uploading it to http://www.virustotal.com

That way, it's scanned using over 40 different AV products.  Of course, even if *all* of them find it to be clean, that's no guarantee it isn't malicious, as malware writers probably check to make sure those AV scanners don't find their latest malware to be malicious before trying to infect systems with it; and it takes time before the AV vendors know what to look for with brand new malware strains

But, it should help to prevent most infections (as chances are, one of the major scanners is going to figure out a new program is malicious fairly soon after it's seen in the wild and reported by users that have installed it).

There is no one perfect solution.

Now, I also use Linux the vast majority of the time, only booting into Windows for special purposes.  For example, I work for a camera review site and help out with reviews from time to time, where I need to test the camera manufacturers' software

Otherwise, I wouldn't bother to boot into Windows at all.  I've probably spent more time in Windows over the past week than I have in the past year, just because I wanted to test drive how some of the AV products worked, and to try and duplicate the bad behavior you reported about Comodo.

IOW, I often go months at a time without even booting into Windows, only doing that so I can update AV definitions, install OS updates, install updates to my browsers and plugins (Adobe Flash Player, Acrobat Reader; Apple iTunes, Java Runtime Environment, etc.).

I don't consider any OS to be immune.  But, because of the way permissions work in Linux, and since it's not targeted by malware very often, I consider using it to be a far safer bet compared to running in Windows.  So, I use Linux the vast majority of the time (>99% of my time using a computer), to reduce the chance that I'll get malware that compromises my machine.

I just keep multiple Linux distros setup in a multi-boot config with Windows 7.  That way, I can choose the OS I want to use from a boot menu each time I restart my PC.

There are many nice Linux distros around now, and most have everything a typical user needs.  For example, Office Suites like LibreOffice, media playback via software like VLC, browsers like Firefox, Chrome and Opera (and plugin support for Adobe Flash Player, Acrobat Reader, etc.); video editors like Kdenlive and Openshot, instant messaging apps like Pidgeon, video calls via Skype, lots of image browsers like Gwenview, Image Management suites like digiKam, and even nice commercial software like Corel AfterShot Pro for Image Management and RAW Conversion (which in my opinion is better than Adobe Lightroom).

IOW, there is no reason for me to use Windows, other than for testing of new camera manufacturers' software.  Otherwise, I wouldn't leave Windows installed at all, since it would just be wasting space.

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JimC
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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 6,025
Re: there is no list, avoid Windows use

Jim Cockfield wrote:

skyglider wrote:

Jim, since you're pretty well versed on antivirus software, could you give me a list of which "free" antivirus software have zero-day protection?

List, huh?

Most AV software has very poor zero day protection.  IOW, if it's virus signatures and/or heuristics don't catch malicious software, it's going to install and run.

..... snip .....

Comodo's approach is better than any other product I've used for zero day protection against unknown malware.  You'll also find that some of the reputable reviewers of malware use Comodo Products for personal protection.  .....snip .....

Fair enough.  I'll continue to use Comodo since it's already installed in my Win7 tower.  Once GeekBuddy was removed, it seems to behaving itself.  Time will tell.

Thanks for your in-depth response,
Sky

ClintB
ClintB Regular Member • Posts: 163
Re: Comodo Getting removed sends ad pop up!

digitalshooter wrote:

I just turned around after typing the above question and there was a pop up on the computer trying to sell me

That can be easily disabled in general settings.

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