Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Started Sep 4, 2018 | Discussions
Alpha23 New Member • Posts: 6
Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

I just got the Godox P120L Para Softbox and I was quite surprised about how tight the ribs where. The Material seems quite good quality als well but I wasn't that happy with the results after the first test. I got hightlights from the bicycle wheel-like parts of the reflector in almost all positions of the light.

Here you see the an godox AD-B2 with 2 barebulbs mounted indirect with a focusing rod.

(Reading direction, left to right)

1.Focused 2. Mid-Spotted 3. Defocused 4. Side view

The inner circle is attached loose therefore it seems to get way tou much light !

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1. Direct mount with inner diffusion ( noticed the multiple shadows?) As I am using 2 bulbs this there might even be double the amount of shadows noticeable)

2.Focused

3.Mid-Focused ( Ugly Hightlights

4. Defocused.

Quick Snap to get in idea of the shape of the Modifier in relation to a parabolic form.

I will test with an one-bulb flash soon but I doubt that the hightlights come from the AD-B2.

What do you guys think? Must be the tension that is missing between the ribs that gave those hightlights on the wall. Or is the due the unperfect parbolic shape?

That cant be supposed to be like that right ?

Ellis Vener
MOD Ellis Vener Forum Pro • Posts: 13,846
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

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Simon Barker Contributing Member • Posts: 835
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Alpha23 wrote:

Here you see the an godox AD-B2 with 2 barebulbs mounted indirect with a focusing rod.

(Reading direction, left to right)

1.Focused 2. Mid-Spotted 3. Defocused 4. Side view

The inner circle is attached loose therefore it seems to get way tou much light !

Looks like it's acting more like a softbox, the light looks uneven in the first photo so that will be visible on output.

RE Alpha
RE Alpha Contributing Member • Posts: 697
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?
1

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

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Ellis Vener
MOD Ellis Vener Forum Pro • Posts: 13,846
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

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RE Alpha
RE Alpha Contributing Member • Posts: 697
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Ellis Vener wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

Haha, got me there. Just didn't read it. I guess my reading stopped at 'Para'...;-) With that in mind I was thinking of the Bron Para line up... (for which they do have a nice scrim though).

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 12,601
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

Haha, got me there. Just didn't read it. I guess my reading stopped at 'Para'...;-) With that in mind I was thinking of the Bron Para line up... (for which they do have a nice scrim though).

If you use a scrim, the unit loses all the qualities that make a parabolic reflector unique. Might as well use a regular softbox.

I use a large Paul C Buff Extreme Silver (now discontinued) PLM without scrim to create a contrasty light with minimal spill, soft shadow-edge transitions, and very little falloff with distance.

The PLM is more even than the Godox appears to be.

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Ellis Vener
MOD Ellis Vener Forum Pro • Posts: 13,846
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Jacques Cornell wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

Haha, got me there. Just didn't read it. I guess my reading stopped at 'Para'...;-) With that in mind I was thinking of the Bron Para line up... (for which they do have a nice scrim though).

If you use a scrim, the unit loses all the qualities that make a parabolic reflector unique. Might as well use a regular softbox.

it is a softbox with a parabolic shape, not a parabolic reflector. It might work as a parabolic reflector if the light can be located at the focus point which I doubt is at at the apex of the curve, I.e. the back end of the softbox.

Now if there is a metal deflector for this Godox P120L use that and you will get some of the qualities of a parabolic reflector. I have an Adorama Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic Quick Softbox (28") that comes with a metal deflector plate that if installed and the internal baffle and scrim are not used has most of the qualities of a parabolic reflector.

I use a large Paul C Buff Extreme Silver (now discontinued) PLM without scrim to create a contrasty light with minimal spill, soft shadow-edge transitions, and very little falloff with distance.The PLM is more even than the Godox appears to be.

Proving my point! With the PLM (I have large Exteme Silver and two smaller ones) and the Bron Para reflectors the light source is. located at the focus point of the parabola.

Lightingrumors.com has a very good overview of all of the current cheap (in other words the Broncolor Para is not included) softsided parabolic shaped softboxes but it does not address the physics of being able to focus the light which I discussed above: https://www.lightingrumours.com/parabolic-9410

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 12,601
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Ellis Vener wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

Haha, got me there. Just didn't read it. I guess my reading stopped at 'Para'...;-) With that in mind I was thinking of the Bron Para line up... (for which they do have a nice scrim though).

If you use a scrim, the unit loses all the qualities that make a parabolic reflector unique. Might as well use a regular softbox.

it is a softbox with a parabolic shape, not a parabolic reflector. It might work as a parabolic reflector if the light can be located at the focus point which I doubt is at at the apex of the curve, I.e. the back end of the softbox.

Now if there is a metal deflector for this Godox P120L use that and you will get some of the qualities of a parabolic reflector. I have an Adorama Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic Quick Softbox (28") that comes with a metal deflector plate that if installed and the internal baffle and scrim are not used has most of the qualities of a parabolic reflector.

I use a large Paul C Buff Extreme Silver (now discontinued) PLM without scrim to create a contrasty light with minimal spill, soft shadow-edge transitions, and very little falloff with distance.The PLM is more even than the Godox appears to be.

Proving my point! With the PLM (I have large Exteme Silver and two smaller ones) and the Bron Para reflectors the light source is. located at the focus point of the parabola.

Lightingrumors.com has a very good overview of all of the current cheap (in other words the Broncolor Para is not included) softsided parabolic shaped softboxes but it does not address the physics of being able to focus the light which I discussed above: https://www.lightingrumours.com/parabolic-9410

What is the point of a parabolic softbox that is not a parabolic reflector? Once the light hits the scrim, it scatters, so it wouldn't seem to matter what shape the box behind it is as long as the scrim is evenly illuminated. The only exception I can think of is if the scrim is extremely translucent (absorbing less than one stop), in which case a parabolic reflector behind it might still yield a somewhat more focused light than a regular softbox. IOW, as I wrote before, might as well use a regular softbox. No?

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Ellis Vener
MOD Ellis Vener Forum Pro • Posts: 13,846
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Jacques Cornell wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

Haha, got me there. Just didn't read it. I guess my reading stopped at 'Para'...;-) With that in mind I was thinking of the Bron Para line up... (for which they do have a nice scrim though).

If you use a scrim, the unit loses all the qualities that make a parabolic reflector unique. Might as well use a regular softbox.

it is a softbox with a parabolic shape, not a parabolic reflector. It might work as a parabolic reflector if the light can be located at the focus point which I doubt is at at the apex of the curve, I.e. the back end of the softbox.

Now if there is a metal deflector for this Godox P120L use that and you will get some of the qualities of a parabolic reflector. I have an Adorama Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic Quick Softbox (28") that comes with a metal deflector plate that if installed and the internal baffle and scrim are not used has most of the qualities of a parabolic reflector.

I use a large Paul C Buff Extreme Silver (now discontinued) PLM without scrim to create a contrasty light with minimal spill, soft shadow-edge transitions, and very little falloff with distance.The PLM is more even than the Godox appears to be.

Proving my point! With the PLM (I have large Exteme Silver and two smaller ones) and the Bron Para reflectors the light source is. located at the focus point of the parabola.

Lightingrumors.com has a very good overview of all of the current cheap (in other words the Broncolor Para is not included) softsided parabolic shaped softboxes but it does not address the physics of being able to focus the light which I discussed above: https://www.lightingrumours.com/parabolic-9410

What is the point of a parabolic softbox that is not a parabolic reflector?

Read on.

Once the light hits the scrim, it scatters, so it wouldn't seem to matter what shape the box behind it is as long as the scrim is evenly illuminated.

I'd say that rather than scattering the light the purpose of the front scrim on any softbox is homogenize the light to eliminate hot spots like the OP is seeing.

The only exception I can think of is if the scrim is extremely translucent (absorbing less than one stop), in which case a parabolic reflector behind it might still yield a somewhat more focused light than a regular softbox. IOW, as I wrote before, might as well use a regular softbox. No?

Yes. But then your clients might not think your gear looks as as groovy and hip.

What I see from some research i(doing a web search for "Godox P120L Para") is that this light modifier is meant to have the light source located at the back end, and not located at a parabolic focus point.

What Godox says about the P90 and P120 series at http://www.godox.com/EN/Products_Studio_Accessories_Parabolic_Softbox.html is this:

"Parabolic Softbox P90 and P120 series adopt deep parabolic design, which enables light to be sent out straightly and brightness to be decreased progressively from central to periphery, thus offering extremely even, soft, and high saturation light effects for shooting with easy installation, simple operation, great portability, and a wide range of applications."

And at no point on the information sheet do they claim is meant to work like a parabolic reflector.

Looking at the photos the OP posted in this thread's opening post, his light source is mounted on an arm to place the lights inside the softbox, presumably at or near the focus point for the parabola. So kudos to him for trying a custom set up and for discovering it does not work the way he hoped it would.

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Ellis Vener
To see my work please visit http://www.ellisvener.com
Or on instagram @therealellisv

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Simon Barker Contributing Member • Posts: 835
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?
1

Jacques Cornell wrote:

What is the point of a parabolic softbox that is not a parabolic reflector?

There isn't one, it's just to sell more softboxes.

Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 12,601
Re: Godox P120L Para Softbox any good?

Ellis Vener wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

RE Alpha wrote:

Ellis Vener wrote:

I think you should put the front scrim on it as that is what it was designed for.

Doesn't that make it a soft box? And if so, doesn't it defy the purpose of a para? Or is it just me interpreting the word 'scrim' wrong?

Why do you think they call it a softbox and not a reflector? Parabolic in this context is an adjective.

Haha, got me there. Just didn't read it. I guess my reading stopped at 'Para'...;-) With that in mind I was thinking of the Bron Para line up... (for which they do have a nice scrim though).

If you use a scrim, the unit loses all the qualities that make a parabolic reflector unique. Might as well use a regular softbox.

it is a softbox with a parabolic shape, not a parabolic reflector. It might work as a parabolic reflector if the light can be located at the focus point which I doubt is at at the apex of the curve, I.e. the back end of the softbox.

Now if there is a metal deflector for this Godox P120L use that and you will get some of the qualities of a parabolic reflector. I have an Adorama Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic Quick Softbox (28") that comes with a metal deflector plate that if installed and the internal baffle and scrim are not used has most of the qualities of a parabolic reflector.

I use a large Paul C Buff Extreme Silver (now discontinued) PLM without scrim to create a contrasty light with minimal spill, soft shadow-edge transitions, and very little falloff with distance.The PLM is more even than the Godox appears to be.

Proving my point! With the PLM (I have large Exteme Silver and two smaller ones) and the Bron Para reflectors the light source is. located at the focus point of the parabola.

Lightingrumors.com has a very good overview of all of the current cheap (in other words the Broncolor Para is not included) softsided parabolic shaped softboxes but it does not address the physics of being able to focus the light which I discussed above: https://www.lightingrumours.com/parabolic-9410

What is the point of a parabolic softbox that is not a parabolic reflector?

Read on.

Once the light hits the scrim, it scatters, so it wouldn't seem to matter what shape the box behind it is as long as the scrim is evenly illuminated.

I'd say that rather than scattering the light the purpose of the front scrim on any softbox is homogenize the light to eliminate hot spots like the OP is seeing.

Yes, and that is an important function, but it does scatter the light, which is why, when you put a scrim on a PLM, you no longer get a focused beam of light.

The only exception I can think of is if the scrim is extremely translucent (absorbing less than one stop), in which case a parabolic reflector behind it might still yield a somewhat more focused light than a regular softbox. IOW, as I wrote before, might as well use a regular softbox. No?

Yes. But then your clients might not think your gear looks as as groovy and hip.

What I see from some research i(doing a web search for "Godox P120L Para") is that this light modifier is meant to have the light source located at the back end, and not located at a parabolic focus point.

What Godox says about the P90 and P120 series at http://www.godox.com/EN/Products_Studio_Accessories_Parabolic_Softbox.html is this:

"Parabolic Softbox P90 and P120 series adopt deep parabolic design, which enables light to be sent out straightly and brightness to be decreased progressively from central to periphery, thus offering extremely even, soft, and high saturation light effects for shooting with easy installation, simple operation, great portability, and a wide range of applications."

And at no point on the information sheet do they claim is meant to work like a parabolic reflector.

"sent out straightly" sounds like the relatively collimated beam you get from a parabolic reflector.

Looking at the photos the OP posted in this thread's opening post, his light source is mounted on an arm to place the lights inside the softbox, presumably at or near the focus point for the parabola. So kudos to him for trying a custom set up and for discovering it does not work the way he hoped it would.

The upshot seems to be that this performs largely like a standard softbox and cannot be used as a parabolic reflector by taking the scrim off. I get the feeling that "Parabolic!" is being used as marketing snake oil a lot these days. All this time, the PLM has been a great product at a great price.

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http://jacquescornell.photography
http://happening.photos

 Jacques Cornell's gear list:Jacques Cornell's gear list
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