Articles tagged "law"

Dutch court rules grandmother must remove photos of grandchildren from social media under GDPR

According to the ruling, the grandmother refused to take down images of at least one of the minors, even after requests from their mother to do so. As a result, the grandmother will be fined €50 for each day the images are still up.

US Judge rules against county seeking to ban drone flights in their parks

Earlier this week, Judge Joseph Farah ruled in favor of Jason Harrison. He was arrested for a legal flight at a Genessee County park (Michigan, U.S.) in December 2018. The ruling is expected to set a precedent for the rest of the United States.

What you need to know about the Mavic Mini and drone regulations

The DJI Mavic Mini is so light – a mere 249g – that it's exempt from FAA registration in the United States. Does that mean it's also exempt from FAA rules? Here's what you need to know.

California tourist fined $20,000 for losing control of drone that landed at airport

A California tourist wanted to take a photo on the Las Vegas strip. He lost control of his drone, which took off and landed a few feet away from an active runway at McCarran International airport.

Utah Senator introduces Drone Integration and Zoning Act of 2019

After an unsuccessful attempt with the Drone Federalist Act of 2017, Senator Mike Lee of Utah is attempting to pass the Drone Integration and Zoning Act of 2019.

Texas court says state institutions can use copyrighted material for free

State institutions can't be forced to pay for pictures they take from the internet, according to a Texas appeals court.

DJI urges public to submit comments on proposed FAA rules

Monday, April 15th, is the final deadline to submit your comments to two separate proposed rules from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Wisconsin videographer sued for more than $14K after court rules he botched eight weddings

A Wisconsin wedding videographer has been ordered to pay back more than $14,000 after he either didn't deliver the services he was hired for or never showed up to the weddings at all.

US Supreme Court rejects request to hear 'Jumpman' copyright suit against Nike

It's been announced that the U.S. Supreme Court will not hear Jacobus 'Co' Willem Rentmeester's copyright case involving the Nike 'Jumpman' logo.

Harvard sued over allegedly profiting from 1850s images of American slaves

Harvard is facing a lawsuit over profiting from 19th century daguerreotypes that captured the portrait of a slave and his daughter on a South Carolina plantation.

New extended UK airport no-fly zones will take effect on March 13

Due to growing concerns about drones around regulated airspace, no-fly zones in the United Kingdom will be more than four times larger than before starting March 13.

Some Kansas City hotspots ban photography over growing disruptions

A handful of hotspots in Kansas City are banning photographers following a number of incidents from 'a few bad apples.'

US Postal Service ordered to pay $3.5m after using photo of Statue of Liberty replica

According to the lawsuit, the US Postal Service issued a new Forever Stamp design in December 2010 that mistakenly features the Statue of Liberty replica in Las Vegas created by Davidson rather than the original statue in New York.

Supreme Court rules online retailers such as Amazon and B&H Photo can be required to collect sales tax

The US Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, has ruled online retailers such as Amazon, B&H Photo, and eBay can be forced to collect sales tax in states, even where they don't have a physical presence, overturning a 1992 Supreme Court ruling.

Sheriff's Deputy who shot photographer won't face criminal charges

The Sheriff's deputy who shot a Carlisle, OH photojournalist after mistakenly identifying his tripod and camera for a gun will not face criminal charges. The county successfully argued that the mixup was reasonable.

Judge rules that embedding a photo tweet is still copyright infringement

If it's upheld, the new New York federal court ruling—which will very likely be appealed—would mean millions of people and publications are violating copyright every single day.

Calgary police catch suspected Camera Store thieves, recover most of the stolen gear

In less than 48 hours from the high-profile camera shop break-in, two suspects have been taken into custody and $18,000 worth of stolen gear has been recovered.

Canada's 'The Camera Store' robbed of $27,200 in high-end camera gear

Owners of the Calgary camera shop are offering a $3,800 reward to anyone who can help catch thieves who stole a Hasselblad X1D, three Hasselblad XC lenses, and a limited-edition Leica M-P Edition Safari.

Trump administration reinstates mandatory drone registration

President Trump has signed a bill that reinstates mandatory drone registration in the US, reversing a court ruling from earlier this year that eliminated the requirement.

DJI adds 'voluntary identification' for drone pilots who want to broadcast their credentials

DJI has just added the option to voluntarily broadcast your drone ID and flight info, so concerned authorities using the company's AeroScope system can see what you're up to without tracking you down first.

Photographer sues Bruno Mars for posting childhood photo of himself on Instagram

Pop star Bruno Mars is being sued for posting a photo of himself as a kid on Instagram. The photographer who captured the portrait in 1989 says neither Mars nor his record label asked for permission before sharing the photograph through all of Mars' social media channels.

Proposed UK bill will let police officers ground and seize drones

The UK has just revealed a new set of proposed drone regulations that it hopes to enact this spring. Simply called the Drone Bill, it would allow police to ground and seize drones, and may further tighten drone restrictions around airports.

Photographer sues New York Times over age discrimination and 'full-time freelancer' status

A former New York Times photographer is suing both the newspaper and its photography director Michele McNally for over $500,000 for age discrimination and unfair classification as a freelancer for nearly a decade.

Congress is considering a copyright small claims bill you should know about

The so-called Copyright Alternative in Small Claims Enforcement Act of 2017 (or CASE) would establish a copyright small-claims panel that would make it easier for photographers and other creatives to pursue small infringement cases.

Judge determines FAA drone rules take precedence over local regulations

A court ruling our of Newton, Massachusetts has set an important legal precedent for drone pilots: federal drone laws will now trump local drone regulations in situations where the two are in conflict.

Photographers face three felonies after climbing bridge for cityscape shot

Photographers Martin J. Romero-Clark and Andrew Lillibridge face three felony charges apiece after illegally climbing the Ben Franklin Bridge to capture some cityscape shots.

French President Macron takes legal action against photographer over invasion of privacy

French President Emmanuel Macron has lodged a legal complaint against a paparazzo who snuck onto the president's private vacation property to take pictures.

B&H Photo will pay $3.2 million to settle federal discrimination case

The company behind retail giant B&H Photo has agreed to pay out $3.2 million in monetary relief and back wages to settle a discrimination and harassment case from 2016.

NPPA to raise dues for the first time in 11 years, because defending truth ain't cheap

Starting January 1st, 2018, the NPPA will raise its membership dues for the first time in 11 years. You have until the end of the year to re-up or join at the current rates.

NPPA says LA public park photography ban is unconstitutional

A photography ban in a Los Angeles public park during a series free concerts has been branded ‘unconstitutional’ by city and national media and public liberties groups.

Photographer behind famous 'monkey selfie' is broke after years-long copyright battle

David Slater's viral 'monkey selfies' made him famous, but the legal battles over who actually owns the photos—him or the macaque who pressed the shutter—has left him broke and dejected.

Federal Court confirms (again): Police can be photographed in public

The US Third Circuit Court of Appeals has confirmed what the First, Fifth, Seventh, Ninth and Eleventh have already stated: it's your constitutional right to photograph police in public.

Two easy steps for using a DMCA takedown notice to battle copyright infringement
Finding an unauthorized use of your photograph on the web is upsetting. This article explains how the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) can help to get your images removed from infringing websites (US only).