Operation and Controls

The controls and operation of the X100T have been considerably re-worked, despite it essentially looking like an X100S.

The biggest change is the two-way motion of the lever on the front of the camera. As before, flicking the lever to the right engages the LCD view in the viewfinder. On the X100T, pushing the lever to the left engages the viewfinder tab when in OVF mode.

Both controls act as toggles (push once to engage, push again to disengage), but the picture-in-picture style 'tab' is only available in optical viewfinder mode, so pushing left when in EVF mode does nothing. The table below maps-out this behavior. The tab is also only available in 'Area' AF or MF modes, where you're specifying the focus point.

 
← Push Lever Right →

Push Lever Left
OVF without tab

EVF Mode
OVF with inset tab

The dark shadow around the picture-in-picture tab doesn't look so distracting in real-life use. Its position will shift depending on the exact position of your eye, relative to the viewfinder. Some of the glasses wearers in the office found the lower right-hand corner of the in-OVF tab is obscured when they'd positioned their eyes to view the center of the finder.

The tab displays whatever type of focus confirmation you've selected in the 'Shooting Menu/3/MF Assist' menu setting: magnified view (Standard), Digital Split Image or focus peaking.

If you change the focus point while the tab is visible, it will retract to show the full OVF image, then re-engage as soon as you confirm the new focus point selection.

Electronic viewfinder:

The X100T's electronic viewfinder mode has been slightly modified. The panel's lighting now adjusts slightly based on ambient light conditions - so it's not awkwardly bright when you're working in low light. In addition there's a menu option (Set-Up/2/Screen Set-Up/Preview Pic. Effect) that dictates whether the camera applies the current image settings to the display or whether it tries to show the maximum dynamic range it's capable of. This is distinct from the existing 'Preview Exp in Manual Mode' menu option, which dictates whether the screen brightness varies with manual expsure setting.

Customizable buttons:

The X100T has seven customizable function buttons, though we suspect many users will end up with only three (for reasons that will become clear, below). As has become standard on Fujifilms, you can re-program a button simply by holding it down for three seconds. Alternatively, visiting the main menu (Shooting Menu/3/Function (Fn) Setting) lets you see a diagram with all the customizable buttons and their current functions.

Functions that can be assigned to the camera's function buttons:
 • Advanced Filter
 • Multiple Exposure
 • Macro
 • Preview Depth of Field
 • ISO
 • Self-timer
 • Image Size
 • Image Quality
 • Dynamic Range
 • Film Simulation
 • White Balance
 • ND Filter
 • Photometry (Metering)
 • AF Mode
 • Focus Area
 • Corrected AF Frame
 • Flash Mode
 • Flash Compensation
 • Select Custom Setting
 • Movie
 • Face Detection
 • Preview Pic. Effect
 • High Performance
 • RAW
 • Wireless Communication
 • Conversion Lens
 • Shutter Type
 • None

Direct AF point selection

As well as being able to customise seven of the camera's buttons, there's also a separate menu option (Set-Up/2/Selector Button Setting) that allows you to re-purpose the four-way directional buttons to directly access AF point positioning.

This is a tremendous advance for Fujifilm, as it means you can re-position the AF point without having to press a button to toggle into another mode. This speeds up camera operation immensely and is something we believe should always be available on a high-end camera. Of course, if your shooting style requires lots of access to other functions, then there's the option to assign AF-point selection to a single button, leaving the four-way controller to access other functions. We hope the same option will be made available to X100S owners via firmware updates.

Customizable Q Menu

Every position in the Q Menu can be re-programmed, to ensure it includes the features you want quick access to in the most convenient position. It's worth being a little cautious when re-programming it, as there's no way to cancel once you've entered the menu to change a setting - your only way to revert is to reset every change you've made in the Setup menu. So before you start making changes, it's worth keeping a note of which options you've overwritten.

Having previously questioned Fujifilm's prioritization of the Q.Menu, it's excellent that users have been given the opportunity to tailor it to their own needs. For many people we suspect this will just be the case of adding just one or two features that are missing by default, but which features those are is likely to vary considerably, so it's good to have complete freedom.

There are 16 slots in total, and a choice of 30 options to fill them.

Functions available for the Q.Menu
 • Select Custom Setting
 • ISO
 • Dynamic Range
 • White Balance
 • Noise Reduction
 • Image Size
 • Image Quality
 • Film Simulation
 • Highlight Tone
 • Shadow Tone
 • Color
 • Sharpness
 • Self-timer
 • Face Detection
 • Photometry
 • AF Mode
 • Flash Mode
 • Flash Compensation
 • MF Assist
 • Movie Mode
 • Movie ISO
 • Mic Level Adjustment
 • Silent Mode
 • EVF/LCD Brightness
 • EVF/LCD Color
 • Advanced Filter
 • Conversion Lens
 • Shutter Type
 • ND Filter
 • None

Electronic Shutter and Flash

One of the options that you can bring to the fore with the customizable Q Menu is Flash Exposure Compensation - something that's always required a trip to the main menu on previous X-series cameras. Another is shutter mode: mechanical (MS), electronic (ES) or both (MS+ES).

In electronic shutter mode the camera's ISO range is limited to the 200-6400 range (the same range you're limited to when shooting Raw, so hardly a big restriction). The other limitation is that the flash is completely disabled. Flash can only be used when in mechanical shutter mode - it remains disabled even when you're operating within the shutter speed range of the mechanical shutter, in MS+ES mode.

On the plus side, though, when you are in mechanical shutter mode, the flash can sync all the way across the shutter speed range, from 1 second up to 1/4000th. As on previous models the maximum mechanical shutter speed at F2 is 1/1000th, increasing to 1/1250th at F3.2, 1/2000th at F4, 1/2500th at F7.1 and 1/4000th at F8 and beyond.

Electronic shutter mode, and the combined MS+ES mode, mean that you don't have to think about these restrictions: you can just keep shooting, way beyond the limits of the mechanical shutter, regardless of the conditions. A maximum electronic shutter of 1/32000th of a second, combined with the camera's 3EV ND filter should be sufficient to let you use your choice of aperture and DR mode-enforced ISO setting in even the brightest conditions.

Custom Auto ISO settings

The other thing that jumps out to us is the improvement in the Auto ISO behavior. Not only is Auto ISO available in manual mode (with exposure compensation), which is always good to see. but the camera also lets you define up to three Auto ISO behavior patterns.

The camera lets you create presets of minimum ISO, maximum ISO and the shutter speed threshold at which the camera will increase the sensitivity. There's no focal-length-dependent threshold setting because the X100T has a fixed-focal-length lens, so it wouldn't make sense.

This level of control means you can, for example, create one preset for landscape shooting (modest, low ISO range and a minimum shutter speed based on your ability to hold the camera steady), with a different one for indoor photography of moving subjects (broader ISO range with a much faster threshold, chosen to freeze motion). Anyone who owns either the wide or tele converter lenses for the camera can then define a third option with a threshold based on the effective focal length of the system with the converter attached.

Again, this is a feature we hope can be retro-developed for existing X100 series owners. We also hope that a focal-length-based program, with a bias for faster or slower shutter speed thresholds can be developed for X-series interchangeable lens cameras, but that's just wishful thinking for now.