Video performance

The GFX 100 is a surprisingly capable video camera. It can capture 4K in either UHD or DCI resolution from the full width of its sensor or can capture 1080 footage at up to 60p. The ability to shoot with the full width of the sensor means you don't have to worry about shooting different lenses or focal lengths for stills and video.

Key Takeaways

  • Shoots attractive 4K video with 10-bit color
  • Choice of Eterna, HLG or F-Log gives plenty of workflow options
  • Stabilization allows off-tripod use but doesn't react well to intentional movement
  • Detail and noise levels aren't X-T3-good but are impressive for a medium format camera
  • Video autofocus is usable, especially with Face Detection, but there'll still be occasional drifting and failure to keep up.

Like the X-T3, the GFX 100 can capture 10-bit footage internally, if set to use the H.265 codec and will output a 10-bit 4:2:2 signal over HDMI. These are impressive specs by any standard.

It can take full advantage of its ability to capture and output 10-bit footage by offering a choice of Fujifilm's own F-Log response, designed to give flexibility for color grading or the ready-to-use (on compatible TVs) Hybrid Log Gamma profile. If you don't intend to get too involved in color grading, there's also the subtle and attractive 'Eterna' Film Simulation, which can be used as-is, but still gives some flexibility for adjustments.

The camera lets you separately select the resolution and color mode captured internally and output over HDMI. You can record and output at different resolutions or record and output different color modes, but you can't simultaneously get processed (Film Simulation) color and F-Log at more than one resolutions.

Internal resolution and color mode
(8-bit 4:2:0 H.264 or 10-bit 4:2:0 H.265)
HDMI output resolution and color mode (All 10-bit 4:2:2)
4K Standard color
  • 4K Standard color
  • 4K F-Log
  • FHD Standard Color
FHD Standard color
  • 4K Standard color
  • FHD Standard Color
  • FHD F-Log
4K F-Log
  • 4K Standard color
  • 4K F-Log
  • FHD F-Log
FHD F-Log
  • 4K F-Log
  • FHD Standard Color
  • FHD F-Log
4K / FHD HLG
(10-bit 4:2:0 H.265 only)
4K / FHD HLG

The GFX 100 is unusual in that it has both headphone and microphone sockets: not something you usually encounter on a high-res medium format camera.

4K Video Modes

Resolution Frame Rate Bitrate Chroma sub-sampling Compression type Codec
UHD/DCI 29.97, 25, 24, 23.98 400 Mbps


4:2:0 10-bit* All-I H.265 or H.264*
Long GOP
200 Mbps
100 Mbps

*Switching to H.264 mode reduces all video to 8-bit 4:2:0 (HDMI output is still 10-bit 4:2:2).

Full HD Modes

Resolution Frame Rate Bitrate Chroma sub-sampling Compression type Codec
16:9 (1920 x 1080)

17:9 (2048 x 1080)
59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, 24, 23.98 200 Mbps


4:2:0 10-bit* All-I H.265 or H.264*
Long GOP
100 Mbps
50 Mbps

*Switching to H.264 mode reduces all video to 8-bit 4:2:0 (HDMI output is still 10-bit 4:2:2).


Video operation

The GFX 100 gains all the video-specific tools the company has been adding to its X-series, so you get focus peaking, zebra indicators and the ability to specify the aperture value in T-stops, rather than f-numbers. The camera also offers shutter speeds that equate to 90 and 180-degree shutter angles (ie: 1/48th and 1/96th for 24p shooting).

You also get the touchscreen-based 'Movie Silent Control' (MSC) function that lets you change most key parameters without risking the noise or shake that can come from using the physical controls. However, unlike the X-series cameras, where this is also the only way to retain distinct video and stills exposure settings, on the GFX you already have this ability without resorting to using the MSC interface.

We've always found the small, densely-populated MSC menu a little fiddly to use, so now you need only use it if you're manually changing settings on-the-fly.

Video performance

The GFX 100's video is very impressive. It's not quite as detailed as the X-T3's, and is slightly more prone to aliasing, but it's significantly more detailed than most high-res cameras can manage. The camera uses every third line of its sensor, then bins three pixels horizontally, meaning its noise performance isn't as good as it would be if it used the full 44 x 24.8mm video region of its sensor. It still looks good, though and doesn't show any worrying signs of aliasing, despite the line skipping.

The camera's image stabilization does a good job of keeping things steady when you shoot off the tripod, but doesn't cope well with intentional movement (panning or walking with the camera): it readily hits the limit of its correction then abruptly resets to the center position.

All in all, the GFX 100 is a surprisingly competent video camera, which is another factor that increases the range of work that you can do without having to resort to a second body.