If you want a camera that you can pick up and use without having to page through the manual first, then this guide is for you. Some of the cameras in this guide have robust auto modes that let you 'set it and forget it', while others have clever interfaces to translate more complex subjects into easily comprehensible language, often with visual guides.

We've included cameras in various classes (and thus prices) in this guide, from compacts costing a few hundred dollars to a full-frame model that will produce much higher quality images but sells for around $1300. Read on to see what we think is the most user-friendly camera on the market.


Our pick: Canon EOS Rebel SL3 (EOS 250D)

The Canon SL3 works perfectly well in its Auto (A+) mode, where it will select the correct settings for the detected scene, such as a sunset. It also gives you the opportunity to tinker with exposure and color settings using a clever interface known as Creative Assist. There, you can adjust things like background blur (AKA aperture), brightness and color saturation (helpfully illustrated with tulips).

When you switch into 'regular' exposure modes (like Program), the camera still provides visual aids showing the effect of changing things like aperture and shutter speed, but this time you actually see the values (such as the F-number) you're adjusting. And this interface shows you how to operate the camera if you ever opt to remove the 'training wheels.'

As a camera, the SL3 takes very good photos, uses Canon's excellent Dual Pixel AF system for video and live view, and is as close to 'pocketable' as you'll get on a DSLR.


While the Canon EOS Rebel SL3 (250D) was our winner, there are several other easy-to-use cameras that are also worth consideration. We've listed them all out below with detailed breakdowns of their features and performance:

Also available:

* This camera has not yet been fully reviewed and is thus not eligible for an award.