The 'pro' aspect of the semi-pro category means that it's home to much more specialist (and specialized) tools than the other categories we've reviewed in these roundups. If you're a studio or landscape photographer, you'll have certain requirements. If you're constantly switching between stills and video, your needs are likely to be different, and the wedding photographer's expectations will differ again.

Rather than recommending virtually all the cameras, based on each model's specialism, we've made general suggestions, for enthusiasts and those photographers whose needs are less specific.

Best enthusiast model: Nikon D750

The D750 was always the least expensive camera in this group but its significant mid-life price drop sees it jump up in our estimation, compared to last year. It's the do-everything capability and relatively low price that make the D750 stand out for us. The image quality is superb and the autofocus - particularly the ability to stick to any subject you specify - is dependable enough for all but the most challenging of sporting events. Video is something of a weak spot but there's always the a7S II if that's your primary requirement. Note that mirror and shutter-induced shake at long focal lengths can be an issue at certain shutter speeds, particularly when using Vibration Reduction.

The other great do-it-all camera in this class is Canon's EOS 5D Mark IV. We may have been disappointed by its 4K video, and viewfinder subject tracking AF, performance but every other aspect of the camera is a more polished version of the Mark III, so there's every reason to expect it will make just as effective a workhorse for enthusiasts and pros alike.

Money no object camera: Sony a7R II

The Sony a7R II deserves a mention for its sheer capability. 42MP of resolution, dynamic range topped only by the D810 and the truly impressive Eye AF system help the Sony stand out, even in this esteemed company. Its video quality is exceeded only by its sister model, the a7S II and their video feature sets run similarly deep. On top of this, it achieves all this from a body that's considerably smaller than the closest competing DSLR, yet still finds room to provide in-camera image stabilization. Only its shorter battery life and price stopped it winning this roundup outright.