Samsung Galaxy Note II

Announced Aug 29, 2012 •
5.5 screen | 8 megapixels (rear) | 2 megapixels (front)
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Product description
Announced Aug 29, 2012
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When Samsung unveiled the original Galaxy Note a little over a year ago, it marked the revival of a stillborn concept: the “phablet,” bigger than a phone, smaller than a tablet. Early efforts in this twilight category like Dell's 5-inch Android-powered Streak failed to catch on. But progress on the software and hardware fronts, as well as a market evolving towards larger handsets, made the original Samsung Note a substantial success. Now the Note II has arrived with an even bigger screen - 5.5. inches vs 5.3 inches on the original. Of course the screen size is not the only specification that has changed. The Note II comes with a beefed-up processor (1.6GHz quad-core vs 1.4GHz dual-core), more RAM (2 vs 1GB) and a bigger battery (3,100 mAh vs 2,500 mAh). The operating system has been updated to version 4.1 of Android (Jelly Bean) too but at 8MP the sensor resolution of the camera remains unchanged.

Product timeline
Review, Mar 22, 2013
Quick specs
OS Google Android
OS Version Android (4.1.2, 4.1.1)
Front camera effective pixels 2 megapixels
Rear camera effective pixels 8 megapixels
Rear camera resolution 1920 x 1080
Camera image stabilization Unknown
LCD size 5.5
Built in memory 16/32/64GB User memory + 2GB (RAM)
Weight 183 g (6.44 oz)
Dimensions 81 x 151 x 9 mm (3.17 x 5.95 x 0.37)

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Our review

The Samsung Galaxy Note II comes with an imaging feature set that is very similar to its smaller sister model, the Galaxy S3. Image quality is almost identical too, with good exposure and vibrant colors but a lack of fine detail due to noise reduction. The Note's big screen is great for composing images but at the same time can make handling a little more awkward. The S Pen is useful for note-taking and sketching but with a lack of stylus-optimized apps doesn't give you any advantage when editing your images.

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Scoring
Camera and Photo Features
Screen Quality
Ergonomics and Handling
Video Quality
Still Image Quality
Speed and Responsiveness