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Huawei criticized for using DSLR-image in smartphone advert

Many viewers would describe the image that Huawei used in a Google Plus post promoting its flagship smartphone P9 as a beautiful portrait. Angled backlighting is creating a golden shine in the subject's hair, and warm subdued colors and lens flare that adds to the composition. Add an attractive model and a natural pose to that and you've got yourself a really nice image.

Most photographers would easily spot that the image in question was not captured using a smartphone though. We've only seen a small version of the image, so can't comment on detail, but the depth-of-field is much too shallow and the tonal range too large for the small sensors found in smartphone cameras. It's no surprise then that the Exif data, which was still embedded in the image, revealed that it had been taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and a EF70-200mm F2.8 lens.

Problem is that Huawei is strongly implying the image was taken on a Huawei P9 in the caption:

"The #HuaweiP9's dual Leica cameras makes taking photos in low light conditions like this a pleasure".

After criticism in social media the Chinese manufacturer has taken down the photo and apologized in a statement to Android Police

"the photo, which was professionally taken while filming a Huawei P9 advert, was shared to inspire our community. We recognize though that we should have been clearer with the captions for this image. It was never our intention to mislead. We apologize for this and we have removed the image."

It's not the first and probably not the last time this sort of thing has happened, but given the Huawei P9 comes with a Leica-branded dual-lens camera, we would at least have hoped for the promotional shots to be taken with a model from the German manufacturer. 

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magneto shot

i think the biggest insult is actually...using canon instead of the Leica SL, Leica M or whatever leica to do the "professional" images.

Jul 25, 2016
Daryl Cheshire

reminds me of the time a well known linux magazine revealed their server ran Windows NT, I forget which, a lot of people were upset.

Jul 17, 2016
Derek Feng

China has the reputation of a nation of fake. This is simply another living example of it.

Jul 14, 2016
Davidgilmour

I could say something about the way chinese do business but that would get me banned, so I won't say it. Instead I will say: great photo Huawei and Leica!

Jul 8, 2016
AntoniusL
AntoniusL

The problem is that most people that buy these phones will not read this article. And that they will continue doing this.

Jul 9, 2016
rialcnis

Busted cold, and they pretend it wasn't intended. For Shame.

They know how stupid most people are, or they think so.

Jul 8, 2016
mxx
mxx

All advertising is misleading in some way, so why this uproar about a simple photo? Or is there a bit of xenophobia going on here?

Jul 8, 2016
EDWARD ARTISTE

As an art director for creatibe media, i say you need to put that broad brush away...its incorrect and you sounds crazy.

Whats next, we are all criminals in some way...

Just stop while your behind

Jul 24, 2016
mxx
mxx

I've got decades of experience in journalism, and you have experience in art. Who do you think is fooling the public the most? Please show me one ad that fully delivers what it promises. See? And yes, we are all criminals in some way or other. Or are you perfect? I think some life experience might do you a lot of good, and I don't mean to offend you. It's just life.

Jul 25, 2016*
EDWARD ARTISTE

Art Director, Media. Creative advertising. However you want to term it.

As I have worked on campaigns that were dead on accurate in what they were promoting, I'm forced to disagree. That fact alone makes what you say not true, even though I understand the point that you're making. I guess I'm just being more technical about it.

Spin is spin...that's fine. Sometimes it's a farce. However, to say no one tells the truth is taking it a step too far.

Criminals...well, i'll just leave that alone. :P

Jul 27, 2016
magneto shot

samsung have been doing these for their galaxy s5 s7s in their official ads with the smallprint "simulated images". (the boy playing in the water and the rooftop shot of the african model)
Oppo have them printed all over the world with their super resolution of a parrot in glorious bokeh..which is impossible.
I dont see anyone crying foul over those?

Now that huawei did it, its suddenly a revelation huh.
Does using Leica brand also implies that huawei must adopt european ethics?

If anything all these ads does is that it confirms only Iphone is doing ethical ads on their cameras, all those images on the billboards are real at least.

Jul 7, 2016
Mike FL

As I said early:

It is not new for using DSLR to FAKE phone cameras. Nokia did the same thing 4 years ago for example:

http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/5/3294545/nokias-pureview-ads-are-fraudulent

Jul 7, 2016
mxx
mxx

"only Iphone is doing ethical ads on their cameras"

My next phone must be an iPhone then.

Jul 8, 2016
martinot
martinot

@Magneto Shot: Not only Huawei and Samsung. Both Nokia has done this with a Windows Phone and before that also Apple with an iPhone.

So while a little embarrasing for Huawei, they are only the fourth phone company to make this blunder.

Jul 8, 2016*
martinot
martinot

@MikeFL: To Nokias defence, while I personally not like such things, they did make a note about it (before the Verge article and media notice):

"Note: The Lumia 920 pictures in this post were taken using prototype hardware and software, and then reduced dramatically in size. In addition, the OIS video, above, was not shot using the Lumia 920."

Jul 8, 2016*
tbcass
tbcass

The only reason that there is such an uproar is because somebody called them out on it. Other incidents were overlooked.

Jul 8, 2016
EDWARD ARTISTE

There are mistakes, and then there is fraud.

This is fraud. A mistake is when a wheel falls off and the other wheels are going too fast to notice.

Jul 24, 2016
justmeMN

"It was never our intention to mislead." - Huawei

Pfft. Oh please...

Jul 7, 2016
Reactive

I'd still love to know how my 3rd party Meike battery grip ended up as such an immaculately perfect replica of the Canon original. And I mean *perfect replica*, all apart from the badge.

Jul 7, 2016
GinoSVK
GinoSVK

HUAWEI Make It Possible... with right equipment.

Jul 7, 2016
agentul

make it possible with a Canon DSLR.

Jul 8, 2016
William Koehler
William Koehler

Huawei shot with a Canon and got fired for their trouble.

Jul 9, 2016
sierranvin

Support the Dalai Lama. Liberate Tibet! Support the Phillipines, Vietnam, Japan and Indonesia against Chinese maritime aggression as they make false territorial claims in the South China Sea! Everything about China is evil. Don't buy from China!
China spews insane levels of air pollution, poisoning their own people and the earth!
BOYCOTT CHINESE GOODS!

Jul 7, 2016
Mike FL

sierranvin;

Do not just say "Don't buy from China!", but do it.

If you did, I do not think you were able to post these MSGs and/or even go to online. Why? Just look your PC, MAC, Smart Phones, tables, mouse, keyboard, Routers, etc, they are all made in China.

NO?

BTW, look around your house, most, if not all, electronic devices are made in China including your light balls...

In other words, you will be very much back to the stone age by nothing is made in China.

Try it by throwing away all your "Made in China", and let us know the results.

Oh, I forget, you have no way/tools to tell us the results after you do not use any "made in China".

Jul 7, 2016*
sierranvin

Gee, Mike, I never actually read the label on anything I bought before... thank you for your stunning, didactic presentation.
One CAN at least try to do one's best to avoid stuff from China, and that's what I suggest people do... until the Chinese improve their act.

Jul 7, 2016
mxx
mxx

I'm sure just like in any other country, the ordinary people in China are just trying to get by and make a living. Would boycotting their products really help them? Surely there are better, less damaging ways of protesting against Chinese aggression.

Jul 8, 2016
sierranvin

Long live the brave Tiananmen Square protesters!

Jul 7, 2016
Debankur Mukherjee
Debankur Mukherjee

thats chinese way of marketing.............

Jul 7, 2016
MdNvS

To everyone talking about "shady" Chinese companies, maybe you should consider that Huawei is the 3rd largest phone manufacturer right now, in 2016? Just a thought.

Jul 7, 2016
sierranvin

Oh, like bigger has even the vaguest correlation with ethics or virtue or corporate responsibility? Your comment is pitiful!

Jul 7, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

So what? They can be the first and still act like a...s.

Jul 7, 2016
EDWARD ARTISTE

Here is an AMAZING so what.

Jul 24, 2016
Sirandar
Sirandar

If they were really trying to cheat they would have wiped the EXIF. It is probably a simple case of the photographic work being contracted to the lowest bidder who may have then purchased the image elsewhere.

Or they flew that model into Shanghai to take the picture with a DSLR, did the shoot and then left the EXIF info in.

The right hand often has no clue what the left is doing in many companies.

Jul 6, 2016
sierranvin

So, if a bank or corporation is large enough, large enough for the "right hand - left hand" confusion you describe, we should all give it a free pass to trample ethics?
Your parents and teachers might be wincing to know you said this.

Jul 7, 2016
Sirandar
Sirandar

Justification ...... not a word I like or use. I wasn't attempting to justify or divert blame, simply stated what probably happened. Ethics, a nice word trampled currently on a mass scale and throughout history. Right now photographers worldwide have felt the boot of corporate ethics. The milk is practically free! Except wedding milk, which tends to sour quickly sometimes unless the photographer is also a magician.

I think I might purchase some Axe cologne so 10 supermodels will fall into my arms. And BTW, Coke and coffee are really really good for you, its just a coincidence that they are addictive and profitable, and the models in their commercials are so beautiful/healthy looking.

PS .. most of my teachers are from the generation just before me, and try as I might, I can't achieve their level of lack of ethics. As my fortunes slowly dwindle due to corporate's fling with permanent "temporary" contract employment (among other things) , I may need to eventually up my game.

Jul 12, 2016*
Sirandar
Sirandar

Since you like to think about ethics ... Huawei is a Chinese corporation and objectively corruption and lack of "ethics" is rampant in China. Employees grey incomes often dwarf above the table incomes. But in China corruption is systemic and expected and part of doing business so it is relatively self limiting and has social boundaries.

The really big payoffs for corruption and lack of ethics is when nobody is expecting it, like the leadup and actuality of the 2008 financial collapse.

My fav peeve is "When I click buy on Itunes, why doesn't it say how much the Label gets and how much Itunes gets and how much the artist gets, is it technically impossible??"

Simple answer "Itunes and the Labels don't want you to know" You can try to figure it out second hand sort of 9cents of 99...... proper SAP could do it.

Jul 12, 2016*
Sirandar
Sirandar

PS .... my 2 previous posts are mostly tongue and cheek because I found your comment below strangely comforting:

"So, if a bank or corporation is large enough, large enough for the "right hand - left hand" confusion you describe, we should all give it a free pass to trample ethics? Your parents and teachers might be wincing to know you said this."

Jul 12, 2016
Rick Knepper
Rick Knepper

And of course, for a beautiful portrait, they turn to what camera and incredibly sharp lens?

Jul 6, 2016
Clint Dunn

That's so unlike a Chinese company to mislead the public or try and cheat. This is the same manufacturer who isn't even allowed to sell Node B cellular equipment in the US.

Jul 6, 2016*
Mike Griffin

That's so unfair. American companies aggressively sell their hardware worldwide while suppressing competition from abroad. Reference NSA backdoors embedded in Juniper routers.

Jul 6, 2016
littlebitstrouds

The majority of demos we do, in professional product displays, are nearly impossible to actually recreate, or are flatly just faked. I watched an entire devision shut down because no one could recreate the quality we achieved using their product, and because everyone involved pretended we were using webcams and basic lighting... Sometimes over delivering can be a hinderance too.

Jul 6, 2016*
Kaso

Ads are not to be taken seriously.

Jul 6, 2016
TN Args
TN Args

Nor reviews. ;-)

Jul 7, 2016
Kaso

I was being kind.

Jul 7, 2016
TN Args
TN Args

LOL I agree

Jul 7, 2016
Edgar_in_Indy
Edgar_in_Indy

I think that "Bait & Switch 101" must be one of the first classes for a degree in marketing.

Jul 6, 2016
Phyltre
Phyltre

It's the other way around. The entire point of PR is boosting the public image of the paying company. There's no inbuilt consideration for the objective virtue of the company in practice.

Jul 9, 2016
Camera Newton

So wait, does #HuaweiP9's dual Leica cameras makes taking photos in low light conditions like THAT a pleasure?

And maybe this was a backhanded comment about Canon DSLRs being more like a smartphone. I bet a Sony marketing guy was behind it!

Jul 6, 2016*
JackM
JackM

Ridiculous.

Jul 6, 2016*
Nick Brundle - Photography
Jul 6, 2016
GRUBERND
GRUBERND

from my experience this is perfectly correct chinese thinking:
"we are as good as that".

they would have no problem using a photo from a Samsung or Apple advertisement for the same message about their product. at least that's what chinese competitors to Siemens did about15 years ago..

Jul 6, 2016
andyyau

You said it was 15 years ago. Things are different now.

Now they said: "we are better than that".

Jul 6, 2016
tbcass
tbcass

Other than DOF I think this could have been taken with a cell phone.

Jul 6, 2016
JackM
JackM

Please take a pic like this with your cell phone and report your findings back here.

Jul 6, 2016
tbcass
tbcass

I never use my cell phone camera because the quality isn't very good (iPhone 6s). I made the comment because technically the photo doesn't look exceptional so I assumed it could be done.

Jul 6, 2016
bobbarber

I found this. Some nice shots here. Scroll down. The better ones are not at the top. I know that somebody will say, "DOF, blah, blah, blah," but cell phones can do some nice work.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/31/sony-world-photography-awards_n_6976552.html

Jul 6, 2016
Edgar_in_Indy
Edgar_in_Indy

Some really nice pictures there. But instead of proving how "good" camera phones can be, what they truly demonstrate is that an interesting subject, good composition, and favorable lighting are the most important elements of a good photo.

The photos in that collection are from people who were very skilled, and/or very lucky.

Jul 6, 2016
tbcass
tbcass

The 1st place one was awful. I would have deleted it.

Jul 6, 2016
G1Houston

"I found this. Some nice shots here. Scroll down..."

5th picture down, proof that cell phone can do action, and GIF (Girl-in-flight) in particular!

Jul 6, 2016
Edgar_in_Indy
Edgar_in_Indy

It was kinda funny or cute, but I don't think it belonged in the gallery.

Jul 6, 2016
ceremus
ceremus

A good artist can make great artwork using a variety of different tools, there's nothing inherently better or worse about using one tool or the other as long as the output reflects the creator's vision. The problem here being when the toolmaker implicitly advertises something it's partially or wholly incapable of.

Jul 6, 2016
JackM
JackM

bobbarber - sooooo much processing going on there, and yeah, the first one is garbage. I agree cell phones are getting better and have basically replaced the point-n-shoot, but good luck if you ever need Dynamic Range, high ISO, zoom, any focal length other than 30mm, or AF worth a damn.

Jul 6, 2016
MdNvS

It would probably be more interesting to look at if it was taken with a cell phone. This DOF craze is getting on my nerves. Let's pay more just so we can have more than a half of an image blurred? They are using bokeh like a crutch nowadays. But when the dynamic range is low-ish so a part of an image is too dark or light, even if it's intentional, they complain. Humans...

Jul 7, 2016
0lf
0lf

No, A smartphone cannot replicate the perspective of a 135mm lens.

Jul 8, 2016
Peiasdf

China have many small and innovative companies that are climbing the international pecking order. Most of the problem with KIRF are with too-big-to-fail state-owned firms that's oversaddled with political appointee, lifetime pensioner and union workers. Those state-owned firms need constant government support and doing all they can to squeeze out the innovative small guy because there is no way the big firms can survive in a quick changing market.

Jul 6, 2016
Mike FL

It is not new for using DSLR to FAKE phone cameras. Nokia did the same thing 4 years ago for example:

http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/5/3294545/nokias-pureview-ads-are-fraudulent

Jul 6, 2016
martinot
martinot

@MikeFL: To Nokias defence, while I personally not like such things, they did make a note about it (before the Verge article and media notice):

"Note: The Lumia 920 pictures in this post were taken using prototype hardware and software, and then reduced dramatically in size. In addition, the OIS video, above, was not shot using the Lumia 920."

Jul 8, 2016
LensBeginner
LensBeginner

Now "inspire" is synonymous with "deceive"? :-D

Jul 6, 2016
Iamnotarobot

Huawei. Chinese company. Not surprised at all.

Jul 6, 2016
dennis tennis

Yes, a German company would never ever ever cheat. It is impossible for say a German car manufacturer to cheat on emission testing. Similarly, British banks would never collude to set the LIBOR rates. Or, a Japanese company would misrepresent its financial reports. Only the Chinese would lack the honor the other countries so clearly have in abundance.

Jul 6, 2016
brendon1000
brendon1000

^^ Please send a crate of Burnol to the OP ! :D

Jul 6, 2016
Eleson

And Ford have assured us all that the Pinto is perfectly safe ...

What on earth made many of the comments be about China?

Jul 6, 2016
Edgar_in_Indy
Edgar_in_Indy

I survived the Ford Pinto as a child! Not to mention the various Mavericks and the Chevy Vegas that my family went through...

Jul 6, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

Only the Chinese are able to steal intellectual property to produce cheap knock-offs of basically everything and be cynical about it. What can be expected if they are the happy producers of cardboard muffins and plastic rice.

Jul 6, 2016
Iamnotarobot

Dennis is very hurt.

Jul 6, 2016
dennis tennis

Wasn't too long ago when it was the Japanese who couldn't design anything by themselves, and all they could do was cheap knock offs, then it was the South Koreans, now it is the Chinese and the Indians. For a bunch of people who couldn't invent, they sure know how to "copy" TV, cameras, computers, etc.. I wonder from whom they are making "cheap knock offs". What country design the cameras we're all using? It can't possibly be the Japanese can it? No, some secret group is designing it. I think it is a bunch of Americans, abducted out of college, sent to Japan and are forced to create all of these tech. It can't be Japanese desgin this stuff. I think all the creative stuff coming out of Asian countries must really be from captured Americans force to innovate or die. We need to send SEAL Team Six to rescue them.

Jul 7, 2016
pdelux

Someone send this man a crate of the finest beer.

Jul 7, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

@pdelux but make sure is German beer! Chinese beer-no surprises here- taste like crap.

Jul 7, 2016*
agentul

breaking news: Sneal Team Triple Seven spotted during Chinese military parade. too late, dennis, they're onto us.

cloning is next, they'll copy whole americans.

Jul 7, 2016
Iamnotarobot

dennis tennis is still very hurt... look at him all excited.

Jul 7, 2016
brendon1000
brendon1000

^^ Dude Dennis is owning you so badly and your come backs are so lame it almost hurts to read them! Just quietly give up or keep making a fool of yourself and continue to make such stupid comments.

Jul 7, 2016
Iamnotarobot

brendon1000 is hurt too. ^^

Jul 7, 2016
Eleson

Yes, the Chinese is the root of all evil. And no one there can do anything by themselves. All others are good.
Wan't some more Cool-aid?

I have my guesses as to who has Done The enlightenment...

Jul 7, 2016
Iamnotarobot

Eleson is hurt too... ^^

Jul 8, 2016
pdelux

@Iamnotarobot obviously you are the one that is hurt, as you cannot respond to dennis tennis's comment with any valid argument. He just schooled you on your childish and bordeline racist views.

Jul 8, 2016*
Iamnotarobot

pdelux is hurt & excited too...^^

Jul 8, 2016
Rob Tupper

Something is wrong with this robot guy.

Jul 11, 2016
Iamnotarobot

Rob Tupper is hurt too...^^

Jul 11, 2016
Eleson

"The #HuaweiP9's dual Leica cameras makes taking photos in low light conditions like this a pleasure"

The way I see it, they say that the picture wasn't taken by the P9.

Do anyone really think that all images in a camera brochures was always taken by the 'right' camera? Wake up and get off the cool-aid!

Jul 6, 2016
sebbe

If you want to sell an expensive cellphone today, you need the best camera output. All big player advertise only on this, with more and more unrealistic promises. It's that absurd, that most people just think an iPhone is almost an equivalent to a FF-camera and can produce the same output in any regard.

Jul 6, 2016
agentul

i'm always tempted to tell people "don't bother, it won't work in this light", but i let them be. sometimes they manage to get a lucky usable shot.

Jul 6, 2016
sebbe

Well on the other hand, you can say the same about some pro-camera users: Sometimes they manage to get a lucky DSLR-worth shot. :D

Jul 6, 2016
Mark Turney
Mark Turney

And yet some buy pro-level DSLR's, leave them on Automatic settings, and thus don't get images with artistic value regardless of their technical "perfection". History repeats itself ... it's always been and always will be the photographer who makes the difference.

Jul 6, 2016
farhadvm
farhadvm

who would think it a photo taken by a cellphone camera???

Jul 6, 2016
(unknown member)

In a way is nice to see such a convincing demonstration from one of the smartphone producers themselves of the major inadequacies of their products.
Long live real cameras.

Jul 6, 2016*
newe
newe

Love your comment. I always use a real camera, D300, at my kids events. I am one of the few that bothers to bring one. Yet when others cannot get any pictures with their cell phone "cameras" they inevitably walk over and ask me to take pictures of THEIR kids. This happens often over and over and over with most parents there. Cell phones CANNOT take good pictures except, perhaps, under perfect conditions. They cannot compete, except for portability.

Jul 6, 2016
Eric Hensel
Eric Hensel

"Cell phones CANNOT take good pictures except, perhaps, under perfect conditions."
That was true 5 years ago.

Jul 6, 2016
newe
newe

Sorry Eric, I can spot them a mile away...poor iso performance, no depth of field, horrible noise reduction. If you believe they are equal, keep smoking the drapes.

Jul 6, 2016
Eric Hensel
Eric Hensel

Who said they were equal.? In decent light, they are far better than you state.

Jul 7, 2016
newe
newe

I said "perhaps, under perfect conditions" and this is true...try shooting and not get blown out highlights or other issues I have stated. I'm not happy with that. If others are great, but when someone really wants a memory, a real camera has no equal. Phone cameras are portable, that I give you, and I do use them. Have you ever PRINTED a phone picture past 4x6? I have, with a multitude of different cameras...no contest. No contest at all. Even on 4x6 one can easily see the difference. I have also been on a number of cruises and to resorts...they say their on-site photography business has never been better because of the camera phone. People only bring a camera phone and end up being disappointed, so they pay the cruise or resort photographer a TON to get their memories. Camera phone quality is not there yet. But for the Facebook and Instagram folk, it is fine.

Jul 7, 2016*
Eric Hensel
Eric Hensel

"Camera phone quality is not there yet. But for the Facebook and Instagram folk, it is fine." Exactly -if that was your first comment, I would have had no issue. Perfect conditions not needed, either, decent daylight or shade will work. BTW -I have shots that look excellent on 4x6...maybe you need a better phone ;)

Jul 7, 2016
newe
newe

Hey..sorry, but I don't like them. Perhaps I have a keener eye ;-)

I have used: Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 5, Samsung 6 and 7, as well as Note, and Apple 5, 5s, and 6, and one HTC I forget the name of and two Blackberry's.

They don't cut it for me....but we agree, they are only useful for the "Facebook and Instagram folk", which I am not a part of. And that crowd is happy with substandard pics.

Oh and don't forget the most obvious issue...no zoom!

Enjoy your phone (and the drapes) :-)

Jul 7, 2016*
Eric Hensel
Eric Hensel

I enjoy my phone, and my cameras (Nex 5n Sony A7). I prefer the camera, but the phone surprises me regularly (Samsung Galaxy-6). I can easily print shots from either on 4x6 that you could *not* differentiate.

Jul 7, 2016
Michael Ma

I think on top of a mountain on a really clear day, with maybe a small child instead of a full grown woman, and a lot of work in photoshop and ACR, you can probably achieve 90% of this photo on a smartphone.

Jul 6, 2016
agentul

"low light conditions like this". really? since when does "low light" produce lens flare from the sun? this is "low light" compared to what, high noon in the desert?

breaking news: small sensor takes good photos in sunlit conditions.

if you want to talk about "low light" at least take a photo at dusk, or under some trees. but wait, you can't properly do that with a small phone sensor without obtaining a blurred pixelated mess. and that's why i had to get a larger sensor camera.

for all i care, they could have taken a comparable photo with the phone. of course, the bokeh would not have been there, but still, it would have been usable. so not only they try to insult our intelligence, they also do it twice with the stupid description.

Jul 6, 2016*
Zdman

I thought the same thing especially when I saw the 1/800 shutter speed.

Jul 6, 2016
agentul

top it off with the -1 EV setting.

really low light. the girl must have been looking for a flashlight, but they cropped the photo.

Jul 6, 2016
munchaussen
munchaussen

What a crazy world.

Jul 6, 2016
chida

Most of the ads are for fooling gullible customers. Cheaters always leave a clue and they are definitely caught!

Jul 6, 2016*
Rooru S

What can I say... China.

Jul 6, 2016
technotic

Yeah, only Chinese companies make these sort of "mistakes". Right.

Jul 6, 2016
Death89
Death89

Nokia Lumia 920 add anyone?

Jul 6, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

Somewhere in time after inventing the paper and gun powder, they decided that is far easy to simply steal other people ideas.

Jul 6, 2016
Mike Griffin

Chinese also invented the printing press, silk fabric, the compass, bone china, multi-stage rockets and heaps of other stuff.

Jul 6, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

Yeah other stuff like plastic rice, cardboard muffins, gelatine eggs, among other delicacies too.

Jul 6, 2016
Rooru S

@technotic: Lately, I'm seeing lot of impressive things from the chinese industry. From copying cars without shame to attempting to get attention by doing crazy PR stuff.

It's China after all.

Jul 7, 2016
martinot
martinot

martinot
@Death89: To Nokias defence, while I personally not like such things, they did make a note about it (before the Verge article and media notice):

"Note: The Lumia 920 pictures in this post were taken using prototype hardware and software, and then reduced dramatically in size. In addition, the OIS video, above, was not shot using the Lumia 920."

Jul 8, 2016
Halina123

Marketing people, too dumb to strip the Exif information from the image!

Jul 6, 2016
Astrotripper

Even if they did strip it, it's blatantly obvious that the photo in question was not taken with a smartphone.

Jul 6, 2016
kingslayer

Shame Shame Shame

Jul 6, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

No surprises here. Chinese are the kings of rip-off, they simply don't give a damn about intellectual property, or creative rights. just check how many fake Starbucks, McD or KFC are in China.

Jul 6, 2016
Hugh J

Not saying that it makes it right, but intellectual property is not a concept easily grasped by most Chinese, being their country is still an officially Communist one, and since it's a one-party political system, it's not like they have much choice in the matter.

http://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/cs201/projects/communism-computing-china/intelproperty.html

The other thing is that this is not a Chinese vs. everyone else issue. (And I'm not saying that you said anything of the sort.) The Chinese also regularly rip EACH OTHER off. Take a look at Chinese brands like Xiaomi and witness how hard it is to get a genuine Xiaomi product, for example. I had to go to great lengths to ensure my Mi earbuds and power bank were the real deal.

Just posting this to point out that it's a little more nuanced than just "they simply don't give a damn." I used to be mad about it too, but once I understood the reasons behind it, I felt more sorry for them than angry.

Jul 6, 2016*
Paul B Jones
Paul B Jones

Yeah, I will never trust them again after that billion dollar diesel engine emissions scam by that Chinese company Volkswagen.

Jul 6, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

@Hugh J exactly, they rip-off their own rip-offs, but no, I don't feel sorry for them, I think they are opportunists who killed good-old artisan's work all over the world with their cheap stuff. I wonder if gun powder is really a Chinese invention or somebody had the idea first.

@Paul B Jones I don't care about VW but I rest my case with this Chinese "auto show".

http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/features/car-culture/its-a-knock-off-chinas-copycat-cars-at-the-2015-shanghai-motor-show/

Jul 6, 2016*
JochenIs

I call the 8€ for a Burger a few fries and a coke in germany a ripp-off.

Jul 6, 2016
Lensmate
Lensmate

Like this article here:
http://www.viralnova.com/fake-food-china/
these are just a few of the things passing off as something else... why not photos as well... sigh!

Jul 6, 2016
villagranvicent
villagranvicent

@Lensmate exactly, I also read about some delicious cardboard muffins somewhere else. LOL. I wonder where those fake Nikon D800's with D810's bodies are put together.

Jul 6, 2016
GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks

Oh please, this is a tempest in a teapot. Do you really believe ANY advertizing you see/read? I take it all as only a possibility of what the product may do, not as gospel that it can/will do it.

However, the absolute worst for false claims has to be the cosmetics and weight loss industries.

Jul 6, 2016
EDWARD ARTISTE

It's called false advertising dude...doesn't matter what you believe, it's all about the facts. And Europe tends to be much harsher abotu these things, ad they actually care about their consumers

If Apple did this, it would HELL to pay (in media terms).

A lie is a lie, that you cannot deny..or again that would be a lie too :) :) :)

Jul 6, 2016
zeratulmrye

Maybe you are right

But other companies DO remember to wipe the EXIF info

Jul 6, 2016
Eleson

Which just means that any picture that have the EXIF information removed, probably had that done for a reason.

A cheat is cheat because it is a cheat. Not because you were caught.

Jul 6, 2016
zeratulmrye

@Eleson

by my standards, cheating is bad
cheat and get caught?
even worse.

Jul 6, 2016
Ooxus

Is ridiculous! Huawei really thinks Leica lenses are made from their smartphone Leica? ))

Jul 6, 2016
n3eg
n3eg

LOL!!!! Once again, YOU CANNOT DO THIS WITH A PHONE CAMERA!

Jul 6, 2016*
Stephen McDonald
Stephen McDonald

The basic issue has nothing to do with cameras. It's about the inherent falsity of all advertising. A sensible person would never consider anything presented in any type of printed ad or on a screen. Those who produce commercials are just another version of the propagandists of totalitarian regimes and terrorist groups.

It's why there was so much opposition to remote controllers and VCRs. They allowed people to skip commercials. Today, it's why there are so few user-owned DVRs available for free viewing of broadcast channels. Time-shifting with them allows the skipping of commercials, without having to wait several minutes on mute and there's no subscription fees.

Jul 6, 2016*
fullstop

If we are to forgive National Geographic we can do the same for Huawei

Jul 6, 2016
Max Iso
Max Iso

"The #HuaweiP9's dual Leica cameras makes taking photos in low light conditions like this a pleasure".

Well if its so easy why could they not use an actual phone shot for the example? Bottom line is, a phone wont produce this kind of shot, so they not only misled, they make false claims.

Jul 6, 2016
Jul 6, 2016
D200_4me
D200_4me

Lesson learned. You have to strip the EXIF info before putting the image online ;-)

Jul 5, 2016
shigzeo
shigzeo

A simple glance would have told you that it wasn't an image from a phone.

Jul 6, 2016
ZJ24

"It was never our intention to mislead." Well, actually it was always your intention to mislead. Why not shoot the photo with a 100 megapixel Hasselblad?
Good smart phones, don't go all Volkswagen on us, Huawei.

Jul 5, 2016
pauldj

Canon apparently used a Hasselblad for a similar ad, of a girl on a sailing boat (film era, 1980s I believe), it was a fitting focal length etc. though

Jul 6, 2016
wallbreaker

huaaa wei too good to be true...false adverstising!

Jul 5, 2016
Rocco Tanica

There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.

Jul 5, 2016
Total: 65, showing: 1 – 50
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