Monogram — formerly Palette Gear — has launched a new Kickstarter campaign for Creative Console, a product it describes as a ‘modular productivity tool’ designed specifically for creative professionals, including photographers and artists. The Monogram Creative Console is 40-percent thinner than the console offered by Palette Gear, the previous incarnation of the company now known as Monogram.

The Creative Console is CNC-machined from aerospace-grade aluminum, offering USB-C connectivity and native support for a number of popular applications. The console's modular components can be configured to suit each user's needs. Compared to the previous model, Monogram's new product offers 50% greater functionality despite the smaller size. The company says each console module supports up to 135 functions.

The console revolves around the ‘core’ module, which packs an ARM Cortex-M processor, 1.54" 240 x 240 display, the USB-C connector, two mechanical keys, and a redesigned power management circuit.

The remaining four modules include a Pressure Sensitive disc, Dial Module with three dials, Slider Module with three sliders and the Essential Keys Module with three tactile mechanical switches. All of the modules feature neodymium magnetic connectors and micro spring-loaded electrical contacts.

For past Palette Gear customers, the existing Palette Arcade-style Button, Multi-function Dial and High-sensitivity Slider are backward compatible with Monogram Creative Console. Natively supported software includes Adobe's software suite, as well as VLC, Chrome, Spotify and select other applications.

The company has exceeded its Kickstarter funding goal and is offering various pledge options for backers, including a Traveller Console for $339 CAD and a Studio Console for $457 CAD. Assuming everything goes according to plan, Monogram expects to start shipping rewards to backers in February 2020.


Disclaimer: Remember to do your research with any crowdfunding project. DPReview does its best to share only the projects that look legitimate and come from reliable creators, but as with any crowdfunded campaign, there's always the risk of the product or service never coming to fruition.