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Shimoda Designs launches its new 'ultra-aggressive' Action X Series camera bags

Camera bag manufacturer Shimoda has launched its Kickstarter campaign for the Action X Camera Bags, its latest camera bag series that builds upon Shimoda's Adventure Series. The Action X series includes three backpacks, two updated roller bags and a number of add-on accessories.

Pitched as an 'ultra-aggressive line of camera bags and accessories,' the Action X Series is made to withstand nearly any environment you throw at them while offering plenty of flexibility to fit your needs thanks to the internal Core Units and modular accessories.

Action X Backpacks

The X50 backpack is the mid-sized model that offers 50 liters of internal capacity at its smallest and up to 58 liters when the roll-top section is completely filled.

Starting with the backpacks, Shimoda is offering three sizes: the X30, X50 and X70. These bags offer roughly the internal volume, in liters, of their respective names and offer a roll-top design that can be used to shrink or expand the internal volume as needed.

Rolling the top closed is a fairly straightforward process, but in the event you forget, don't worry—Shimoda included instructions right on the bag.

Like their Adventure Series counterparts, the bags offer a number of features, including height-adjustable and swappable shoulder straps, a 15-inch laptop sleeve on the back panel, dual carrying handles, weatherproof designs and countless straps and attachment points for attaching almost anything to the bag, be it a water bottle, tripod, helmet, skis or even a sleeping bag.

Tucked inside the bag is a 50ºF down-alternative sleeping bag, a single-person hammock and an insulated sleeping pad with a windbreaker jacket underneath it all.

The most noticeable difference between the Adventure Series and Action X Series is the new roll-top design that compresses and expands to your needs. However, there's also a new removable belt and a number of new shoulder strap options, including a trio of female-specific shoulder straps, to ensure the most comfortable fit possible.

This is what the bag looks like folded up with the gear from the previous picture inside.

We were sent a pre-production X50 review unit (with a DSLR Medium Core Unit) to take original photos with for this article and test out before launch. Having spent time with Shimoda's Adventure Series bags in the past, it's clear from our time with the X50 backpack that Shimoda has been hard at work fixing a number of sore spots within its inaugural camera bag lineup.

The Core Unit's side flap now folds neatly into a little slot on the backpack's side access point, which makes it much easier to access a camera kit quickly without removing the bag from your back.

The most notable improvement from our experience with the bag was the updated side access pockets. On the original Adventure Series camera bags, side access was possible, but it seemed like a bit of an afterthought. The Action X Series dramatically improves side access with the V2 Core Units and a clever little slot in the side access panel that now allows the Core Unit to open with the side access panel on the backpack, making it exponentially easier to access a camera or drone without the need to entirely remove the backpack.

The side access is nice, but when you need access to all of your gear, this is how you'll get it.

The roll-top design of the Action X Series also proved to be a nice change of pace from the Adventure Series. Not only does it clear up clutter on the top of the bag compared to the Adventure Series, it was also beneficial when we needed to shrink or expand the internal storage depending on what gear we were carrying with us on a given day.

The shoulder straps attached to our X50 pre-production model were the standard straps. Also available is a padded strap and three different female-specific straps with thoughtful contours and padding location.

We didn't get to test out any of the new female-specific shoulder strap designs or the padded 'Plus' shoulder straps, but just having the option to swap out shoulder straps is a welcomed feature that very few other camera backpacks offer.

Updated Roller Bags

In addition to new backpacks, Shimoda has also launched updated roller bags: the Carry On and a new DV (Digital Video) version. The Carry On is essentially the same as the previous roller Shimoda offered, but improves durability and adds new 100mm wheels, which provide more clearance from the ground and are both smoother and quieter than the first-generation roller bags. The new DV version is identical to its Carry On counterpart, but larger in each dimension to offer more real estate when carrying larger video equipment and/or super telephoto lenses.

Core Units

As with Shimoda's adventure series, the new Action X Camera Bags work alongside Shimoda's Core Units to protect camera gear inside the bag and make it easy to transfer gear from one bag to another or from a backpack to a roller bag. The updated Core Units come in five sizes: Mirrorless Medium, DSLR Medium, DSLR Large, DV Large and DV Extra Large. Shimoda has provided the below graphic to show what bags are compatible with the different Core Unit sizes.

Aside from the new side-access functionality, the V2 Core Units are essentially identical to the first generation units, aside from the addition of two larger sizes.

Accessories

The Top Loader accessory is large enough to carry a camera body and lens or a small drone kit.

In addition to new bags and updated Core Units, Shimoda has also added a few new accessories, including a new Top Loader bag for smaller kits, a 4 Panel Wrap for organizing cables and a Stuff Sack Kit for compressing clothes and other gear.

Wrapping up

Shimoda has already surpassed its $30K goal on Kickstarter. There are countless kit variations available through Kickstarter, but the basic X30 Starter Kit — which includes the backpack, a Medium Mirrorless Core Unit and a Rain Cover — starts at $250. Prices go up from there depending on the size of bag you want and the Core Units and accessories you want alongside the bags.

The first backpacks are expected to ship December 2019 to 'Anywhere in the world.'


Disclaimer: Remember to do your research with any crowdfunding project. DPReview does its best to share only the projects that look legitimate and come from reliable creators, but as with any crowdfunded campaign, there’s always the risk of the product or service never coming to fruition.

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sdgreen

Wow. Don't marketing depts speak a load of rubbish. An 'ultra aggressive backpack'. I think I would be frightened in case it turned on me. In that photo of the top opening it looks like it's going to bite...& it's behind you most of the time.

4 weeks ago
Artak Hambarian

I do not agree that it is impossible to have excellent travel/hiking camera backpack. The statement "There is no perfect bag" is incorrectly interpreted. These camera bags are already pretty expensive, and fixing elementary issues cannot be impossible. E.g. the waist belt IMHO should NEVER be attached to the back opening panel. Both this new Shimoda model, and Backlite Elite 45 have this fault. My Backlite 36 has it correct, but lumbar padding is somehow far from perfect, while many other bags have it right... There is no magic here, just a bit more of prototyping and testing - the price that you ask should assume this.

4 weeks ago
Robert Wasilewski

I have to agree attaching the waist belt to the back panel seems like a bad idea. I think the reason the lumbar padding may not be ideal and they may be doing this is to have full access from the back side of the pack, however I think a design that perhaps uses the bottom portion (which would be blocked off by a proper waistbelt system) for water or other stowage could make a ton of sense and allow for a proper riding backpack with full comfort. If I did long trips I would likely buy a comfortable backpacking pack and modify it by sewing on things like tripod holders and then adding protective camera carrying inserts to the interior.

4 weeks ago
Artak Hambarian

Robert - that could be a solution that is totally acceptable for me, if the full access is the reason for bad padding, which have ocured to me too. The reason that I have doubts is the fact that first generation Shimoda has been regarded as the most comfortable backpack, while having full opening (I personally have not tried it), although the door opens to the left and not to the bottom...

4 weeks ago
Bing Chow

Artak: I have the Shimoda Explore 60. The downside of attaching the hip straps to the sides of the bag, as opposed to the back panel (Explore 30 and Gen 2 models), is the tendency for the back panel to cave in as you tighten the hip belt. Shimodas are soft sided bags. Your back tends to push the core unit towards the front of the bag. IMO, this limits the amount weight the bag can carry. I've tried it with about 38lbs, and there comes a point where you can cinch the hip straps tighter, but it doesn't feel like the weight is shifting onto the hips. In contrast, if the hip straps were attached to the back panel, the circumference gets smaller the more you tighten. But I imagine that design comes with its own set of compromises too.

I have stated numerous times on various threads that Shimodas are great camera bags that can handle low to moderate hiking demands. They are for photographers who needs to hike to get from A to B, not for thru-hikers who have some pics to grab.

4 weeks ago
Robert Wasilewski

Totally agreed it can handle moderate hiking demands, I take my 40L on day hikes quite often and for a camera bag it's the most comfortable I've used. I use it as an everyday camera bag as well where some walking may be required and I need nearly all my gear with me. I just wouldn't take it on a real overnight or several night backpacking trip into the wilderness, I've spent 2 weeks in the Adirondacks with everything I needed to live on my back and a real pack is a must for comfort. I never thought about the issue with the back panel collapsing as you tighten the belt, I would think the opposite would be true if you cinched up the waist belt, it'd actually stretch the back panel but you probably mean the side adjustment straps. I never put that much weight in mine but probably close to 30 lbs a few times. It'd be nice to see some in depth reviews on how the new design "rides" with different payloads as compared to the old design.

4 weeks ago
Bing Chow

Robert: I loaded it up as if I was going to overnight it somewhere. Hiked about 8mi, trying to test the bag's limit. I'm a softy in the woods. I want a 2P tent, inflatable mat, warm sleeping bag, hot meals, etc. If I know the weight/comfort limit, I can either carry less camera or buy even lighter camping gear.
I never hike for the fun of it but if I did, for sure I'd use a real pack. People get all up in arms because Shimoda, F-Stop, and Lowepro doesn't cater to expedition market. Perhaps it's because they already understand that you can't have an expedition-grade suspension with back panel access, which is what lot of photographers want. Or that such a real hiking bag would be prohibitively heavy to have all the foam walls that camera bags tend to have. They know it's best to use your own wraps and inserts in real packs so they're not even bothering to crowd into that market. Stick to their niche, which is to cater to photographers first.

4 weeks ago
Stigg

did they launch them in a rocket or by slingshot?

4 weeks ago
Robert Wasilewski

Owning the Shimoda 40L I have to say it's a great camera bag that allows some degree of hiking. Having said that if you were going on a real backpacking trip seriously get a real backpack with a proper waist belt and suspension and stuff your ICU or other padded camera bag inside there along with your camping gear. Camera backpacks are definitely getting better, my old Lowe AW Trekker was horrible, like a box with shoulder straps on it, extremely uncomfortable but still nobody is making a true backpack quality camera bag solution that affords the comfort of my North Face, Gregory or Kelty packs.

4 weeks ago
The Saturnyne

Having seen reviews of the bag online, i am very taken with it. I own a Shimoda 40l and it's the best camera bag for a day-long trek i've ever owned. Just nudging my F-Stop backpack into a very close 2nd place. But... it lacked a few things, and the 50l version absolutely ticks all the boxes missing from the 40l. The only thing that is going to stop me from going with this on Kickstarter is the absurdly expensive import duty i'd STILL have to pay, plus the possibility of the upcoming Brexit insecurity.
Hopefully somewhere in the UK will be selling these, because Europe will be as much of a burden to order from as the USA soon, it seems. Already my camera gear has become more expensive, but who knows... and that's the problem.... nobody knows.

4 weeks ago*
Shimoda Ian

Hi, when the bags are sent to the EU, VAT is paid by our distributor. So you don't need to worry about VAT (if that is what you were referring too). Also I have been informed Brexit has been deferred until end of January (you would have delivery before then), and there will likely be 1 year transition period for customs changes. Feel free to email if you have any other related concerns - ian@shimodadesigns.com

2 weeks ago
The Saturnyne

Thanks Ian.
Wow you must be busy. I've seen you replying to people all over the place.

That is deeply appreciated. Even if you're not all the same person, although i kinda suspect you are =)

1 week ago
Kiwisnap

Do they know what aggressive actually means?

4 weeks ago
cosinaphile
cosinaphile

aggressive ?.... im only interested in bags that are assertive , with a touch of waggishness, while retaining the steadfastness and quality necessary to be a bulwark against camera mishaps ..........just sayin

4 weeks ago
Bing Chow

Why do people insist on telling the world that a certain product doesn't fit their needs? It's like they're frustrated that bag makers don't see the world the way they do. I don't go on truck forums and whine about how the world doesn't need another $85000 truck to pull horse trailers just because I don't own a ranch.

4 weeks ago
Suntan

Why do people insist on telling other people what they can tell the world...?

4 weeks ago
TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse

I do that when I've spoken with other photographers who feel the same, to tell the bag maker that they've missed a group. Over here, nature photographers are constantly talking about their gear. Maybe it's because there are relatively few camera shops that are outdoor oriented, if any.

4 weeks ago
nextSibling

As a photographer who generally tries to remain friendly and non-aggressive, I guess this bag isn't for me.

4 weeks ago
selwynbr

nearly 2 minutes into the video to find out what material the bags are made of!

4 weeks ago
cricnours
cricnours

1- A bag for people who don't know how to choose (their gear)
2- A marketing non-sense (ultra agressive, I should say ultra uggly)
3- A too big package, too heavy when full
4- Another Kikstarter

1+2+3+4 = nobuy

(I should have be more clever and do not read)

4 weeks ago
sh10453
sh10453

"Ultra aggressive" ... It must be hiding a Bengal tiger inside? Now I'm too scared to buy it.

While this might be someone's greatest bag ever invented, I have gotten tired of my VERY large bag, and decided it's time to get something that doesn't break my back anymore.
So I took advantage of a sale on the Canon 200EG bag (backpack) last month for under $40.
I'm quite happy with it.

4 weeks ago
cosinaphile
cosinaphile

hahahaa...... its a bag of snakes...

4 weeks ago
Tungsten Nordstein
Tungsten Nordstein

'Ultra-agressive' ?
What kind of way is that to sell something? Inappropriate messaging there, I think.

4 weeks ago
CanonKen

Roll-tops annoy me to no end. Take what should be a quick process and slow it down to something more difficult and worse.

4 weeks ago
Suntan

Have to agree. Roll tops are OK when you are planing to fill it at the start of the day, then dump everything back out at the end of the day. Even then, it feels like reaching down into a cave to grab your gear out.

4 weeks ago
Slouch Hooligan
Slouch Hooligan

Roll tops suck but they are, by far, the most water resistant pack closure method.

4 weeks ago
Suntan

@Slouch - And yet this pack has huge Uretek zipper access doors covering the front, back and sides of the pack. So....

4 weeks ago
Michiel953
Michiel953

Ultra ugly.

4 weeks ago
lobster roll

It looks like a Patagonia backpack, which is very in right now if you aren't an old person. It's way better looking than 99% of the bags that look either like a 'camera bag', some faux retro something, or a women's purse.

4 weeks ago
cosinaphile
cosinaphile

it has sort of the aesthetic of a lawn and garden plastic garbage bag , but you know ... on a diet

4 weeks ago
Duncan M

People still wanting to walks around for a whole day with 25Kg of gear on their backs?

Plan ahead and you don't need to carry around all of your gear.

Do yourself a favour buy the Photo Transit app and TPE or PhotoPills and it saves your back from getting hurt. But most importantly you are not exhausted after the day and still have the shot for which you came for.

4 weeks ago
Threaded

Agreed. Especially with all the great mirrorless gear around now, I’m always a bit puzzled by the need for things like this. One camera one lens, at least one lens at a time, sling that over your shoulder and off you go. No idea why you’d want any other clobber when on foot.

4 weeks ago
Zerixos
Zerixos

Sure, if you can you should. Keep in mind that a lot of landscape photographers travel from a to b and will not return to their base/camp/car/home for multiple days.

4 weeks ago
Duncan M

@Zerixos - I know a lot of landscape photographers that travel by camper. They park as close by the spot they want to photograph. The walking distance mostly not more than 3 to 5 miles often much less.

Sure there will be some that hike, but those very often still not take all their gear with them; a small tent, one or two lenses a tripod, a cooking device, some water and some ration. They travel as light as possible.

4 weeks ago*
TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse

@Duncan M
As a wildlife shooter you have to hike a lot in order to find the animals, unless you go to a hide/blind and take the same pictures just like everyone else.

For mammals and birds you need a tele lens and that adds a lot of weight. You need binos when searching for them, for insects you need a macro etc.

4 weeks ago
Bing Chow

@Duncan M @Threaded

And what about med/large format shooters or pro video guys? IMO, shorter hikes are perfect for hauling heavy gear because even if it doesn't have an Osprey-grade frame, it's comfy enough to get from car/camper to shooting location. This style of carrying gear is made for people who are out there specifically to create photo/video. Thru-hikers, ultralight trekkers, or anyone needing to carry a pack "all day" should look elsewhere.

4 weeks ago
Duncan M

Bing Chow - You mean those Fujifilm users that take the burden on themselves?
Well they have been influenced by marketing to think it makes 'the difference', while in reality nobody will ever see that the image was taken with their GFX as FF is as good these days and the GFX is just a crop MF camera anyway.. Real MF format camera's hardly ever see the daylight as they live in a studio. For landscapes a DSLR is an unnecessary piece of equipment these day even for pro's.

4 weeks ago*
Zerixos
Zerixos

How you know? Plenty of photographers bring along their Mf camera’s. Phase one has a colleberation with nya-evo, an adventure backpack like the shimoda. I also bring along my hassy when I go out. Everyone has their own preference, and a bag should be able to carry that what you want. Maybe this isn’t the bag for you, but it’s the right bag for a lot of people who like adventure and photography or film.

4 weeks ago
CP09

in reality mirror less don't really save a lot weight and space.....
it is the lens choice and other equipment that makes the difference.
the lightest 600f4 from sony still weights a good 3kg so one either choose to bring it or not.
Even if not and only go for landscape only, the two Gitzo 4553s that weights 2kg without head and the gigapan epic that weights 3.3kg with battery.
It would still put it over 10kg with just two body and two lens of any kind.
I am not even speaking of something that I don't usually bring for landscape photography.

1 week ago*
Athonline

They look rather nice, but also overpriced for what they are. Both fStop and Mindgear offer similar solutions cheaper. Even better (for your back and wallet), you can get a snowsports backpack, like the Gregory Targhee, which fits ICUs from fStop and PD and has rear access.

PS: What's up with the hipster music at the background of the promo video? I found it distracting; even more so than other KS videos.

4 weeks ago*
CeeDave
CeeDave

I am a happy user of “ordinary” packs, with simple pouches (neoprene, etc) and padding (small towels or jackets) for lenses, flashes, bodies and tripods rather than bulky, expensive, and awkward divider systems. Say something like an Osprey 30 L internal frame pack—you get much better suspension, a rain cover, great quality, and save a lot of money, too.

4 weeks ago*
Zerixos
Zerixos

I was looking at the Shimoda advanture bag 60, because I still want to carry a tent and other gear. But I didn't think the side acces looked that great, (small) so I was also looking at the Fjord 60-C which has the same inner design but expendable downwards when used with smaller core units/RCI as they call them. Now another contender joined the game making the choice even more difficult. I have tried many bags but these 3 look the closest to what I'm looking for.
Its a real shame that the X70 doesn't have the side acces, that would be my go to bagpack as its the biggest... what to do?

4 weeks ago*
Shimoda Ian

Hi, The X70 doesn't make an ideal side-access pack. Packed relatively full and weighted it would be an uncomfortable and awkward experience to use it slung under the arm. It's a big enough bag you will want to put it down to access it. Feel free to email me if you need any help. ian@shimodadesigns.com

2 weeks ago
zakk9

This is the backpack I was looking for when I bought my Whistler a few months ago. Oh well... there's no such thing as too many camera bags, is there?

4 weeks ago
TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse

Well, I counted them again, camera packs: 8 Clik Elite, 3 Think Tank, 2 Lowepro, 2 Kata, 1 Tenba. And 3 dedicated hiking packs. Didn't count the holsters, belts and pouches :-)

Maybe it's me but with some packs it takes a few days to realize that they don't work. And then you can't return them. That's why they are hanging at my wall, as a constant reminder.

4 weeks ago
tonywong

@TheBlackGrouse, I thought it was only me!!! I have a full baker's rack of bags now, in my quest for the perfect bags and packs.

4 weeks ago
Becksvart

Seems like a potentially rather nice pack..I occasionally hike with an Osprey pack that swallows a sleeping bag, hammock with a sleeping pad strapped to the outside and usually bring just the small lens on a camera attached to a pack strap via a PD quick release thing. With this Shimoda one might be able to bring heavier lenses easier (though not necessarily easier access). As a prior commenter commented it mostly depends on how you feel after half a day of hiking with it.

4 weeks ago
Ranger Danger

The seem to be running the same time as the Peter McKinnon wonder bag

4 weeks ago
blurredvision

Looks like a nice pack to me, lots of nice little touches that improves quite a bit over my current pack. I may just be in for an X30 even though I really don't care for the kickstarter marketing, but what are ya gonna do? If I like it enough, I might as well save the money.

4 weeks ago
stevo23

Oh boy, another bag. Another Kickstarter.

4 weeks ago
RPJG

Nvm.

4 weeks ago*
4 weeks ago
nbklaw
nbklaw

Kickstarter ==> read no further.

4 weeks ago
Wanderer23

its not a no-name brand though. I have more faith when its an established brand like peakdesign or shimoda. definitely not their first rodeo.

completely with you on new startups though....

4 weeks ago*
nbklaw
nbklaw

You are more forgiving than I am. I assume that sometimes established brands use Kickstarter and the like as something of a marketing tool or a way to test interest, but to me Kickstarter screams we have a germ of an idea but we are unable to self-fund R&D and manufacture because: (1) we are cash-strapped due to poor sales and bad management, or (2) we can't borrow money or find an investor because we are cash-strapped, we have bad management and also maybe because in actuality the product idea sucks. Maybe I am old fashioned in this regard. I would rather put extra money in some actual investment account and if I see an existing item that meets my needs, buy it if it is actually available. I have never seen a Kickstarter item that was so profoundly unique and otherwise unavailable that I would risk my hard-earned money on an incomplete idea promoted by people unknown to me.

4 weeks ago
TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse

Yes they are ugly and the height adjustment system sucks, but they look promising. Since - the - brand Clik Elite has gone, there is hardly any dedicated camera backpack for active photographers.

F-Stop, Mindshift? No... not really.

Side access is really important for wildlife shooters. It is the only way to have fast access without wearing a chest pack, Cotton Carrier vest, Black Rapid strap etc. In difficult terrain all these extras slow you down or are simply dangerous. Your backpack has to do it all.

However, it all comes down to how comfortable the suspension system is after 10-20 miles of hiking. The real test is as always the next morning: how do you feel when thinking about another 20?

4 weeks ago*
Suntan

I've done a fair bit of technical hiking with a full sized SLR strapped into a cotton carrier on my chest. I would not say it is any more dangerous than having the camera in the backpack on my back.

Further, I do find value in having side access on a backpack for day trips where I might be taking the camera out continuously throughout the day. But when I am hiking 15 miles, with 20 more the next day, I'm not stopping constantly to take pictures. As such, I'd take the true hiking backpack (which has a much better suspension than this bag) and stuff the camera inside (if I would take it at all.)

4 weeks ago
gtvone
gtvone

Not to hijack your thought-train, but I'm interested why you don't think our Mindshift offering has what it takes to be a camera bag for active photographers? The feedback always helps, cheers. Simon @ MindShitGear / ThinkTank

4 weeks ago
Suntan

@gt I don't know a lot about your packs, but in looking quickly on B&H, the Mindshift pack I saw has the compression straps overtop of the water bottle pockets. That's an automatic non-starter in my book.

4 weeks ago
TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse

@gvtone
For instance, the start of Mindshift was promising with the Horizon and the rotating belt pack. Since I had the original Think Tank Rotation 360 I couldn't wait to buy this pack. Unfortunately I had to send it back, the suspension system and waist belt were not up to the task.

Wildlife photographers need fast access. As I've written in other posts, the Mindshift rotating belt system is the best for shooting wildlife. Therefore you need a pack that carries something like the 100-400 II. The Horizon can't do that. Ok, but why not built a larger stronger version?

Another example, the Multi Mount Holster, by far the best chest pack. But again, it can be much improved. I don't get it. Mindshift has great designers but it seems that they don't care anymore after the first product version. There are other examples like the Shape Shifter II and Change Up II.

See this as constructive criticism, I'm a consumer researcher, specialized in customer decision behavior, and a big fan.

4 weeks ago
gtvone
gtvone

Have you tried/ taken a look at the Backlight Elite? Appreciate the feedback!

4 weeks ago
lilBuddha

@Suntan
These are no supposed to be technical hiker packs, but for photogs who hike,bike,ski, etc.
Different needs.

4 weeks ago
gtvone
gtvone

@Suntan yep, they're multi-purpose, so water/tripod/walking poles/etc, not just for water and have to have an option to cinch in.

4 weeks ago
Artak Hambarian

Gtvone: I have the Backlite 36l, its bottom digs into my back, which is not an issue in winter when I have a number of layers, but in summer it is problematic. Nevertheless it is my main bag now. I also have the Horizon 34 l, which I bought since it is a high bag tech - it does not have the aforementioned problem, but its use cases are limited. Overall I love your products, but agree that there is room for important improvement. I can tell that, since I probably have around 20 or more of your products...

4 weeks ago*
Suntan

@gt

Yes, they should be able to cinch down. But that should be separate from the compression strap compressing the whole bag.

Essentially, lashing down the main bag and lashing down the side pocket should be two separate, independent functions. One shouldn't have to lose compression on the main compartment (and potentially have gear shift around) just to put something back in the side pocket.

4 weeks ago
Suntan

@lil

My comment above was in direct response to someone talking about using the bag for multiple 20 mile days.

And if you notice my comment was in agreement with you that this bag would not be a good fit for that use.

4 weeks ago
Erick L

Compression straps over pockets is stupid design, plain and simple.

4 weeks ago
gtvone
gtvone

It's a camera bag first - not a hiking pack. You . can't have a perfect hiking pack and camera bag in one product, if you could, I'm sure we/someone would have made it - but you can't. So yes, agree, there's always room for improvement, which is why we take notice of worthwhile feedback.

4 weeks ago
Suntan

"It's a camera bag first - not a hiking pack."

I would buy neither a camera pack nor a hiking pack that has compression straps that go over the side pockets.

Regardless, don't ask for feedback if you are just going to get defensive and start giving weak reasons to justify bad design choices.

4 weeks ago
CP09

How would you compare this bag to the think tank backlight elite 45L?

4 weeks ago
gtvone
gtvone

Oh Suntan... Ain't no defensive here, this is the internet, tone is quite hard to convey, sometimes. You should most certainly not buy this bag, it isn't right for you. Hope you find what you're looking for, and, as always, thanks for your feedback.

4 weeks ago
Erick L

Compression straps over pockets is bad design for any type of backpack. If you want to put poles or a tripod in a side pocket, you cinch it above the pocket. Some packs have the option to run straps under the pocket but over only is really, really bad design.

4 weeks ago
TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse

Yes, you can have a perfect hiking pack and camera bag in one. It starts with a good sample of photographers having thousands of hours of hiking experience, carrying different packs and gear. Years ago I did something like that about hiking gear in general. This causal research is complicated but it is possible.

4 weeks ago
gtvone
gtvone

Thanks for your feedback.

4 weeks ago
Artak Hambarian

I do not agree that it is impossible to have excellent travel/hiking camera backpack. The statement "There is no perfect bag" is incorrectly interpreted. These camera bags are already pretty expensive, and fixing elementary issues cannot be impossible. E.g. the waist belt IMHO should NEVER be attached to the back opening panel. Both this new Shimoda model, and Backlite Elite 45 have this fault. My Backlite 36 has it correct, but lumbar padding is somehow far from perfect, while many other bags have it right... There is no magic here, just a bit more of prototyping and testing - the price that you ask should assume this.

4 weeks ago
Suntan

@gtv "Hope you find what you're looking for"

I never really could, so I made my own pack.

4 weeks ago
Peter_Birch
Peter_Birch

I find them very ugly. I would have called them the bin liner series.

4 weeks ago
Barry Benowitz
Barry Benowitz

bags are not deep enough must be at least 9" deep to handle Medium Format. Laying long or larger lenses flat take up too much room.

4 weeks ago
CaPi

6‘ :-) for bad gear

4 weeks ago
Holscen

9 inches deep will also allow a camera to be packed on its side instead of its base plate, handy for my gripped bodies.
Allows me to pack much more in.

4 weeks ago
CaPi

Ripoffstarter. Apologies but no way in H am I going to invest in something like that again

4 weeks ago
Bugsy-ef

I thought this announcement looked interesting. I'm not privy to what Shimoda has done in the past. Do you have a poor experience with them?

4 weeks ago
CaPi

I was referring to experiences with kickstarter projects- especially for photography gear

4 weeks ago
mxx
mxx

I'm afraid of aggressive camera bags. I like mine docile.

4 weeks ago
BobT3218

But not everyone is so secure as you, in their self-image. Some need to exhibit an illusion of aggression and purposefulness to justify their meagre existence. But seriously, it's probably a good bag as so many are it's just that I would feel a dork with a bag called "Action X". It's bad enough that my favourite bag is labelled "Nation Geographic" :)

4 weeks ago
Mr Bolton

AGRO, BRO!!

4 weeks ago