Throwback Thursday: Kodak DC265
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Throwback Thursday: Kodak DC265

When you think of unique cameras, the Kodak DC265 (announced in 1999 for $899) probably doesn't come to mind. The first thing you probably notice is its unusual shape and 'foot' to keep it from tipping over. But what really made it unique is that it ran Flashpoint's Digita OS, which was fully scriptable (the company and OS did not last long.) In other words, developers could add new features by writing some code and putting it onto a memory card. Several Kodak models at the time supported Digita, as did those from HP, Konica Minolta and Epson.

Before we get to that, here's a quick overview of the DC265. It had an F3.0-4.7, 38-115mm equivalent lens, which is so loud when it's extending that it made my coworkers in other cubicles wonder what on earth was going on. It had a whopping 1.6 Megapixel CCD, an external autofocus sensor (that we think involves infrared light) and an optical viewfinder that isn't nearly as large as it appears from this view.