The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Photo credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Plenty of people were pointing their cameras up at the solar eclipse today, but leave it to NASA to capture a little something extra. From his vantage point in Banner, Wyoming, NASA photo editor Joel Kowsky captured a dual eclipse of sorts: the moon obscuring the sun, and the tiny pinprick of the International Space Station obscuring a little bit of what was left.

As the ISS and its six crew members flew in front of the partially obscured disk of the sun, Kowsky had both still and slow motion video cameras trained on his target.

Here's a closer crop of the photograph above:

Here, a composite that shows the ISS's full transit across the partial eclipse:

And, finally, a slow motion video of the transit, recorded by Kowsky at 1,500 frames a second:

To see these photos and video in their full glory, head over to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flickr account.


All photos and video courtesy of NASA/Joel Kowsky