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Samsung's built-in storage chips might make microSD slots a thing of the past

MicroSD storage expansion slots are a feature that is slowly but surely disappearing from high-end smartphones, with "cloud-focused" smartphone manufacturers such as Google or Apple leading the pack. However, at least Samsung users can stop worrying about a lack of expandable storage in the near future, because the built-in storage in their devices should soon be large enough to never need a microSD card in the first place.

The Korean electronics giant has officially started mass production of the world's first 512GB embedded Universal Flash Storage (eUFS). This means Samsung's 2018 flagship smartphones may have double the storage of this year's equivalents.

Users will be able to store up to 130 10-minute video clips at UHD resolution on these new chips, and read & write speeds have been improved as well, reaching 860MB per second and 255MB per second respectively. That is fast enough to transfer a 5GB video clip to an SSD in around six seconds. It is also eight times faster than a standard microSD card, making the internal storage solution much more suitable to anyone who requires fast data transfer.

Samsung says it is planning to steadily increase production volume to meet increasing demand for its high-capacity mobile storage, so hopefully we'll see the big chips coming to other manufacturers very soon as well.

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unLTE

moving stuff to a pc would be a pain, since some phones i know will just crash windows explorer (or make them not responding) when connected to a pc for the media transfer or sd reader mode
also expandable storage , easy sharing and separated storage
and also, twrp and backup stuff....
last but not least not everyone have blazing fast upload speed for the cloud (125kbps Upload sigh...)

20 hours ago
Toselli

Ok, nice, but how do you interact it with your pc? Itunes is terrible, and the microsoft "multimedia device" standard used by android is not that far, it works one time, and one it doesn't, and when it does it's terribly slow with a bunch of small files. To copy my 5-6 gb whatsapp folder took something around 30 hours, with usb 3.0! Copying on a "slow" microsd takes only a couple of minutes...

6 days ago
Tommi K1

How long it takes to move all dues from one phone to an laptop or network attached drive when phone dies?

1 week ago
Sergey Borachev

Why am I reading so much brainless stuff on DPR lately? Consider data privacy, data backup so it's safe from loss or theft of phone, use in remote locations with no connectivity, reusability of sd cards in new devices, speed or transfer, and of course cost. micro SD card surely disappearing? That's what phone makers want, but Samsung actually had to put it back after buyers revolt when they tried. I say, everyone, vote with your feet if Samsung tries again. I would rather get a Xiaomi, Huawei or whatever phone than lose the micro.SD slot.

Recommending a camera with no mike input and tilt-only LCD (as well as a poor EVF).as the best video camera (Panasonic GX85) in its category is another example of silliness in a recent DPR article. There are much better cameras for video on that category, including one from the same brand, G85.

1 week ago*
WhiteBeard
WhiteBeard

Err, not that I always agree with DPR's reviews but last time I checked, the GX85 was about 300$ cheaper than the G85 besides not being the same form factor. Yes, the G85 is in my mind a much better camera than the GX85 if you don't mind the size difference, but they are not intended for the same "clientèle"...

1 week ago
Sergey Borachev

$300 for someone buying an ilc (not talking about cheap fixed lens compacts) is not a big deal if you look at the differences: better or improved IBIS, DFD and AF, IQ, shock resistant shutter, EVF, articulated screen, WR build, ergonomics and handling, and mike input. And if I remember correctly, the camera was chosen as the best in a category limited by a $ price point. It's simply ridiculous IMO to select a camera crippled for good video (like input), as the best camera for video.

1 week ago*
Francis Sawyer

Some people actually accept being called stupid to their faces, and prove it by buying phones without a headphone jack. If you think the lack of an SD slot will stop them from throwing money at their insulters, think again.

1 week ago
cosinaphile

any phone so crippled sd or audio wise i instantly stop reading about or following . no matter the other specs.. its dead to me ..... i leave hastily and in disgust apple oneplus google pixel htc11.etc..... dead dead dead dead

6 days ago
wetsleet

I know two people whose mobiles died spontaneously (one down the toilet, the other plain old age). One had all the photos stored on the SD card, the other went with internal storage. Both suffered the cost of a new mobile phone. One kept all her photos, the other lost them all.

1 week ago
JordanAT
JordanAT

Yup. I've had one phone die as a result of defect, one of my own clumsiness. Both had SD Cards. Both took under 10 minutes to swap out and transfer all non-SD data to the new phone. Had I needed to transfer the 175GB over wifi or even USB, it would have taken quite a bit longer.

1 week ago
Slouch Hooligan
Slouch Hooligan

There are scenarios to support any position you care to take on any issue. That’s why people use anecdotal evidence! There’s something for everybody!!

1 week ago
dylanear

NO. Because an SD card slot is about being able to quickly transfer a lot of data as much as expanding storage for me.

Breaks my heart SD slots are so rare these days. And the fact that almost no phones have removable batteries anymore.

1 week ago
jwasturias

I concur.
Regarding non user replaceable batteries. Same issue with Laptops.
Once the battery is bad, even plugging the laptop in a power supply does not work. You have to diconnect, remove or replace it. I had to do this with an Asus gaming laptop after 3 years. It was not easy to get to the battery.

1 week ago
dylanear

Agreed, just got my first laptop with a built in battery, simply because I couldn't find any with a removable battery with the specs I want. Frustrating to be sure. And swapping to a spare battery is a great way to instantly keep working on the go.

Reduced functionality, planned obsolescence, and people buy into it as long as the product is shiny and pretty.

I blame Apple! First they created the easy to use, elegantly designed computer, now they ruined the industry.

1 week ago
Francis Sawyer

Apple and its pompous hack Jony Ive are doing more to drive the phone and computer industries backward than anyone else.

Music-centric phones WITH NO HEADPHONE JACK. That is a direct insult to consumers. It's calling them STUPID. And they gobble it up.

1 week ago
cosinaphile

well said

6 days ago
Robert Krawitz

dylanear, what specs were you looking for? There are plenty of higher-end Linux/Windows laptops around with removable batteries.

6 days ago
dylanear

I ended up with a Lenovo P40. Something hybrid for tablet like use, with pro qualified (Quadro) graphics, or at least good nVidia discrete graphics. 16GB ram, not more than about 4lbs (less would have been ideal). Very good pressure sensitive pen input for painting, retouching. Open to hear suggestions, though I am loving the P40 and have no intention to replace it any time soon.

6 days ago
Robert Krawitz

Oh, you were looking at the size/weight issue; I wasn't (I got a P70 refurb).

6 days ago
cosinaphile

ha .... i just bought a refurb lenovo x250 with full desk dock .... its incredible in its quality has an internal battery and a removable one too for hot swaping

5 days ago
dylanear

That P70 is a beast!!! If weight isn't a issue, that looks pretty sweet! Jealous of that screen, the Thunderbolt ports, higher spec Quadro options! And the removable battery of course! But I could never haul a 7+lb laptop around unless I absolutely had to.

2 days ago
Robert Krawitz

The P50 is lighter with most of the same capabilities

1 day ago
M Chambers

I was really surprised that Samsung actually responded positively to customer feedback and added the micro SD slot back with the Galaxy 7.

By comparison Apple wants to hold all your info hostage! And it's just plain evil to have a 16G model so they can advertise a low price and then not have a 32G which most customers will want so they can force people up to the 64G model.

1 week ago
Slim Letaief

I use Micro SD for it's versatility and to keep all my stuff in one place while I can restore , format my phone without worrying about my data...I swapped iphone with samsung because of that..

1 week ago
OneLeggedCat

Maybe when smart phone manufacturers quit charging $100 for $9 worth of extra internal storage, this could work. I don't see that ever happening.

1 week ago*
techjedi
techjedi

They will only stop that behavior when people stop buying their products. For iOS you have no choice but to switch platforms, which I agree would be tough, but if you are already on Android, there are plenty of great choices that have microsd and you don't need to pay the extra memory tax.

This video is old, but still funny:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FL7yD-0pqZg
(warning there is harsh language if you want to avoid it)

1 week ago*
cosinaphile

wow still applicable years later ....very funny

6 days ago
Karroly

If an external storage is useful for many people (including me), the removal of the SD card slot helps make better weather-resistant devices. The next step will be the removal of the USB socket thanks to wireless charging and high-speed wireless data transfert...
Plus I predict an embedded SIM card that will be initialized through a Wi-Fi connection before first use... So the smartphone could be totally sealed.

1 week ago*
brianric

At that point I say adios to smart phones. Without the ability to transfer backups to my computer or being able to use navigation programs in my car without charging the phone then there's really no need for a smart phone. As it is right now I cannot make a call using hands free in my 2016 Honda Civic Touring without my iPhone plug into the USB port.

1 week ago
Karroly

I was talking about weather-resistant smartphones only... I think making non weather-resistant smartphones with removable battery, removable SIM card and removable SD card is relevant for many users (including me).

1 week ago
M W B G

You still have the SIM card to deal with so there will have to be a slot for that though.

1 week ago
Karroly

@M W B G,
I do not quite agree. SIM cards are more or less programmable and could be soldered into the camera. One can imagine a way for the service provider to initialize the SIM card by connecting the phone to the provider's internet server, in a secured manner (i.e. using keys/passwords) through a Wi-Fi connection.

1 week ago
M W B G

That's true but the fact is they don't do that

1 week ago
jwasturias

I like the idea of not having to rely on the USB to charge.
The micro USB sockets are very fragile and you will be lucky to make it last 3 years. Two of my older phones are almost unusable because of this issue.

5 days ago
rrccad

the problem would be.. what's the wear leveling like? how may bytes written can these modules handle?

1 week ago
RPJG

Why would you assume it would be a problem?

Samsung makes these chips, they make the phones, they make SSDs where all this stuff is important, they understand the requirements - do you *really* think they haven't thought of that? Really??

1 week ago
Karroly

@RPJG,
The fact that Samsung have thought about that does not imply that they can provide a reliable solution... We need figures...

1 week ago
rrccad

RPJG because as a consumer it's a very valid number to be concerned with. Frankly i could give a rats ass about whether they thought of it or not.

Btw, I'm sure they thought about batteries charging and discharging as well. how'd that work out for them?

1 week ago*
RPJG

Jeebus.

1 week ago
HRPuffnstuff
HRPuffnstuff

"640K of memory is enough" possibly said by Bill Gates but he denied it

1 week ago
MJL1952

Forget the word possible - he did say it, I remember. IBM stated in the early 50's that in The Netherlands there was only a requirement for four computers and that 64K memory was enough.... My first hard disk was full height 5 1/4" and was ... 5Mb.... The PC at the time cost as much as a decent near new secondhand car.....

1 week ago*
shademaster

"Will this eliminate the need for microSD slots?"

"IBM Has just introduced an optional permanent magnetic disk drive in it's PC. Will this eliminate the need for the floppy disk?"

1 week ago
Karroly

The floppy disk has been eliminated because it is big and has ridiculously low capacity and speed by today's standard. But in PCs, blazingly fast internal SSD storage has not eliminated the use of somewhat slower external storage for many obvious reasons...

1 week ago
gn28

PLEASE put one of these in the next generation RX10 and RX100, so I can finally move away from my D5500.

The SD card is a nice backup, but I want the main storage to be in camera and blazing fast. Lets the slow and fauly SD be just a backup over time.

This will probably also ens the rolling shutter issue caused by slow writing speeds.

Thanks Samsung and Sony!

1 week ago
Karroly

Rolling shutter issue has nothing to do with slow SD card writing speed because there is a faster memory buffer between the sensor and the SD card.

1 week ago
sibuzaru

I would say they could use a internal+microSD/UFS slot for backing-up

but totally agree, most of the cameras could use some internal storage

1 week ago
Karroly

Internal storage in P&S or compact cameras is not new. But the use of big capacity and fast internal storage requires the use of a high speed link (like USB 3.1) for PC transfert. This increases camera power consumption and price. It should be reserved to high-end products, IMHO... until memory chip price drops and battery capacity increases.

1 week ago*
balios

512MB of on-board storage with 500 MB of uninstallable bloatware...

1 week ago
Petroglyph
Petroglyph

512GB not MB. And spyware not bloatware. :^}

1 week ago
balios

I stand corrected, lol

1 week ago
so-what-17

Ya remember when smart phone first came out, the big companies made lots of money off the pay per megabyte internet, now will be the pay per megabyte and pay more for cloud space and than release all the cloud information to who every pays more by accident

1 week ago
AndreStMaur

Why wouldn't these chips be used in micro-SD cards?

1 week ago
Karroly

There could be many reasons :
- the data throughput of those memory chips is faster than the one that the today's micro SD card bus can handle. Using it in a micro SD card would require to access it at a lower speed.
- the micro SD card case is not suited to dissipate the heat of those fast memory chips.
- today, the chip may be too big to fit into the micro SD card case, until there is a die shrink that could allow it.
- current consumption is higher than micro SD card current rating.

1 week ago*
dccdp

Micro-SD card storage is good not because of its capacity, but because of its convenience. Easily swapping cards containing different collections of data (music, pictures, videos, etc), without going through the hassle of copying or downloading is a big plus.

Not to mention the fact that if a SD card fails, you just replace it; if internal storage breaks, you change the entire phone.

1 week ago*
just someone

Exactly mu thoughts!
There goes one of the biggest benificts of owning a Samsung phone.

1 week ago
greynolds

To add to that, there's no such thing as too much storage, especially for those who don't have cloud access all the time.

1 week ago
gn28

nobody said this will replace the SD card. Just like in phones, you'll be able to use the SD as a backup while the fast chip storage will do tge heavy lifting.

1 week ago
just someone

Nobody said but if you're not naive you kind of know they will remove it!

1 week ago
Zdman

All that will happen is that apps will bloat to fill the space same as they did as hard drives grew in size on pc's in the old days. Removable storage will be necessary so long as mobile data cost remain high or speed is too slow and outside of major urban areas that's always going to be a problem.

1 week ago
Karroly

Those high-end smartphones more and more offer an USB-C connector. Why not backup the internal storage content to a USB-C storage dongle when needed ? There are really tiny ones available. They are as fast as a micro SD card, if not faster. They are more expensive than microSD cards, but if you can afford a high-end smartphone, it should not be an issue...

1 week ago*
Zdman

because that means dongels, hooking things up and remembering to do back ups. Much easier to pop out a SD. Not to mention if you want to put your music on one SD card and some movies on another and perhaps some TV series on a third you can chop and change SD cards rather than hooking up a large external drive.

1 week ago
paulbysea

I notice there is no price stated for this memory, so I expect it will be at a premium initially, high end phones only. Give it time and with faster wireless speeds I am sure we will end up with microSD being a rarity in phones.

1 week ago
Sheacash

One of these in my G7 would give me 10 hours 4k video, or over 30 hours 4k in my phone - once the move to hevc happens those figures could probably double.

That sounds like ample storage for a consumer kit to me.

1 week ago
Stephen McDonald
Stephen McDonald

I guess their intended buyers would never think of the convenience of popping a card in a slot, rather than having to hook up the whole camera in some way?

1 week ago
Mike CH

And then next year, this will be barely enough to get in a couple of family snaps...

1 week ago
photonius

Reminds me of the mythical "640K ought to be enough for anybody" quote. There will be never enough. Soon 8K video....

1 week ago
Halina123

I still remember the 64k is enough.

1 week ago
The Squire
The Squire

Nice speeds n' feeds, but if phones are moving to being cloud centric, then there is no need for 512GB in the handset. You only really need a cache for content up/down from the cloud. A big-ish cache to give you good performance for the media youre accessing most, say 32-64GB.

IMHO, these components are more aimed at tablets and, and these speeds, possibly low end laptops.

1 week ago
wasTF

Honestly, my 5000+ pictures/videos on my phone and on microSD card will never go into the cloud. Especially not when i want access to it EVERYWHERE i go, including buildings with not signal and where i have no WiFi (Underground parking garages and the like), underground transportation, regions of the country with no signal (for my provider)... and the list goes on an on.

So, while google and amazon and apple like it that they can see all our pictures in the cloud, i strongly am opposed to using it (all the time for everything)

I hope people will get it, allright???!!!!

1 week ago*
Adrian Harris
Adrian Harris

Cloud centric devices are a real pain in the neck for those who live in 'the countryside'. We consider ourselves very lucky on those rare occasions we can get a signal.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

It's not about storage capacity. It's about the price you are asking for it, Samsung.

1 week ago
TyphoonTW
TyphoonTW

This x1000. For 20/25$ it's possible to buy good quality microSD cards that add 64gb of storage and can be easily swapped around. Smartphone makers ask A LOT more than that for a 64gb increase in internal memory.

1 week ago
Boissez

This is UFS storage which is very different from eMMC, so you can't really compare it with bargain-bin Micro SD cards.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

And we don't want to ...
How does it justify removing the card slot? They are two different things.

1 week ago*
Sdaniella
Sdaniella

unfortunately, Canadian customers usually get "half" of typical offerings of a two-tier lower-vs-higher memory models available to American customers

whether it be Samsung smartphones or tablet pcs, or Apple, or other mfrs

right now micro-SD cards are affordable 128gb (~$40 or less*)

if Samsung offers a mere 512gb to US customers, Canadians likely get a paltry 256gb (barely $80 or less* worth in regular micro-SD cards)

granted, built-in memory tends to be higher quality than their "loose" counterpart, so costs are higher, but still, much prefer option to quickly switch out removable memory at will

i HATE anything to do with relying on wifi (cloud-somewhere "maybe") to access something ONLY if wifi is available

*prices always drop over time per gb

1 week ago
Garug

The biggest question is transfer speed and where to transfer. Would a action cam etc that uses MicroSD be ok with internal memory only?

I do not think so, there is always need to fast replase the full memory.

1 week ago
barrym1966

So external memory is faster than internal memory? 🤔 Surely distance to CPU and bus speed/size would determine which is faster ?

1 week ago
Merowech

I'm pretty sure Garug meant transfer speed FROM the internal device to wherever you need the data.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

@barrym1966
It is about transitioning data between devices. Taking out an SD card and putting it into a laptop or something is much faster and much easier.
You think 512GB is a lot or enough? What if I need more? What if I have multiple phones and tablets? Phones without card slots is like fascism. They want full control over your data while not being responsible for anything that could/will happen to it.

1 week ago
BarnET

"They want full control over your data."
That would be cloud storage.

You are responsible for what happens on your phone.
You can encrypt the data on the SD. You can make sure your phone doesn't get stolen.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

Don't tell me they can't access all of your data on the phone they've produced, even if it's been encrypted. If your phone can read it, then it's not a secret. Trust me.
I want to be responsible for my own data. Just give me that damn card slot :)). May I, please? - Problem solved :)

1 week ago
BarnET

It's even easier if the files are already on their servers.
We can still install custom roms and limit access accordingly.
Even though investigators are extremely capable in hacking/installing backdoors

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

How is that easier than not having to build any data servers and access the data directly from the storage you've paid for and keep it connected. The problem is that they want to make us pay for their servers :). This is like voluntary slavery.

1 week ago
Tonkotsu Ramen
Tonkotsu Ramen

Not sure why there's a negative reaction to built in storage. Do people not realize built in storage doesn't need to replace an SD card? They can compliment each other.

imagine, 128gb built in, 128gb sd card....

maybe thats too new n hip for the people here on dpr tho

1 week ago
Fujica
Fujica

Easy peasy answer: What's fast today is slow tomorrow, what you need today might not be enough tomorrow.

If you can't upgrade the storage capacity then its a throw-away product. If you don't care about that then its consumerism to the top.

1 week ago*
FarawayPictures
FarawayPictures

I thought phones were throwaway products?

1 week ago
Death89
Death89

Maybe it's that most manufacturers will use it as an excise to do away with expandable storage? I'm not one for keeping everything on my phone, but I appreciate knowing that if the phone dies I don't risk losing all my data. Cloud backup is all well and good but only when you have a regular, decent connection and a data plan to support it.

As a general point, smartphones have been steadily stripping away features* that don't suit them and this would just be the next victim. Phones are becoming very bland in my opinion.

*removable batteries, decent size camera optics, buttons (Key One excepted), styli (note series excepted), HDMI out, proper stereo speakers, decent stereo speakers (idol 4 series excepted), USB OTG at least still exists but is never advertised as a feature anymore.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

There is no negative reaction to built-in storage. There's a negative reaction to not having a card slot. Read the topic :)

1 week ago
BigBen08

Oh great, just like laptops, pcs and tablets, the cost of cameras will depend on the amount of internal storage. Want the 128GB model? That's an extra $200.

1 week ago
lylejk
lylejk

Ah; no. Many have already eluded to the reasons why external storage is much more desirable. What's needed is improved speeds of such external devices. Regardless, I do not see the need for external storage go away any time soon. :)

1 week ago
ChatBot

As far as I know, you are correct. The devices have a slow write speed. The interface is plenty fast enough. For example, my Canon 7D can make 37MB of JPEGs per second. The Compact Flash interface can handle at 160MB per second. However, SanDisk's second fastest Compact Flash cards have a minimum write speed of 20MB per second. That means only the FASTEST cards are fast enough for an 8 year old camera, even though the interface on their SLOWEST card is fast enough.

1 week ago
Debankur Mukherjee
Debankur Mukherjee

May be DSLRs of the future will have a built in large memory and eliminate the use of external cards and thus saving cost and introducing slimmer bodies.........

1 week ago
Fujica
Fujica

There is no future for the DSLR.
The CIPA report shown yesterday was a clear indication that the DSLR is a thing of the past. MILC is near the tipping point of becoming the dominant standard for photography.

1 week ago
ChatBot

We could make slimmer bodies now, if we wanted to. (Canon 100D) People want more external controls and better ergonomics. That requires large bodies.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

Built-in storage doesn't have to replace memory card slots. We need both. With internal storage we won't need a second slot though.

@Fujica
DSLR never was a mainstream product. This is like saying mobile phones are replacing both DSLRs and MILCs because everybody has one. Possibly MILC are replacing the low-end DSLRs. That makes sense. But enthusiast level "mirror slappers" are still in demand, because of their unparalleled AF speed, battery life, vast infrastructure (optics and accessories) and affordability. Fully digital cameras are coming, but not yet. "Global shutter" will be revolutionary and it will replace the mechanical one entirely. But you can't fully replace the mirror. Hybrid view finder (OVF+EVF) could change things.

1 week ago
KeepCalm

@Fujica
Dominant in new sales but not necessarily in usage. These DSLRs can last a long time and the mirrorless stuff does not exactly look like it is made to last as the new driving force seems to be based on the rapid obsolescence of each generation. Difficult to get reliability in to this constant change scenario.

1 week ago*
BarnET

reliability id more of thing of how many things can go wrong. A mirrorless camera has just 1 moving part. The shutter which in time will go away too (look at the A9)
They already have longer shuttercycles then their competing Dslr's. Sure the small bodies sometimes have heat issues (looking at you sony)

But those will be solved over time when smaller more effcient chips become available. Which is even though it takes more time still an on going process.

In short MILC's will be more reliable then their Dslr counterparts. Simply because less can go wrong. If that isn't already the case with some examples.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

Heat makes things go wrong.
Heat increases entropy.
Heat drains batteries.
Heat is bad :)

1 week ago*
sirhawkeye64

Most people want removable storage for backing up and sharing, so I don't think that storage space (at least, beyond 256GB of onboard memory) is that big of a deal (at least in my opinion). I mean, my 128GB IPhone 7 is plenty of space for me for music and videos and photos, but I still wish I had a card slot so I could move things on/off the phone more easily, like a lot of the Android phones can do (and not have to rely on iTunes all the time for storing media files other than photos). I personally think that no matter how much space you put onto a chip, people will find a way to fill it up with stuff. 512GB is impressive, but I'm sure that someone out there has a full 256GB smart phone and would fill the remaining 256GB in a year or two with stuff. MicroSDs will still be relevant at least until all the tech that uses them, starts dying off, but that will probably be 5+ years at least.

1 week ago*
sirhawkeye64

Many people in the computing/IT industry said the spinning HDD is dead, but many people still use them for storage (NAS, or as secondary drives in their PCs/LAPTOPS). I mean, companies like Western Digital and others are still making them and I don't see them quitting HDD manufacturing any time soon. Yes, the volume of drives being produced has dropped, but they are still relevant, even though we now have 1TB and 2TB SSDs (cost is a big player, though, in why people still use large HDDs too... 1TB HDD you can get for about $30-40, but a 1TB SSD is about $250-350.

1 week ago*
cosinaphile

while a 6 t 8 to one price difference exists yoj will have both

a 2 tb ssd is still more than 600
4 tb is 1500 dollars

2 tb seagate barracuda spindle drive is 59 dollars
8 gb is 249 usd

1 week ago
ChatBot

I already did the math. My camera needs 2.4 TERAbytes of on board storage. Otherwise, I want removable storage.

1 week ago
Robert Zanatta

There are already a couple options to move fits off the device. Connect to a computer, or use an OTG cable.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

@sirhawkeye64
What? "the volume of drives being produced has dropped"? Are you sure? :)
Maybe they stopped making 1TB drives, because we need more capacity? Same reason they don't make 80GB or 160GB or 320GB HDDs anymore. The amount of data in the world is increasing exponentially. Tomorrow we'll need more storage, than we need today. Plus, drives fail, die and have to be replaced.

1 week ago*
sirhawkeye64

https://www.statista.com/statistics/285474/hdds-and-ssds-in-pcs-global-shipments-2012-2017/

https://www.statista.com/statistics/398951/global-shipment-figures-for-hard-disk-drives/

(Now, I won't put much weight on Satistia as I don't know where exactly they get their data.) But it seems that they are making a ton of headway in either integrated storage (like Samsung) or SSDs (they are finding more ways to cram more data onto the same number of chips). You don't see a lot of companies coming out with 6TB and 8TB HDDs. Back in the day when 1TB drives and even 2TB drives were popular, every company that made HDDs had them (part of the decline has to do with acquisitions over the years of course, WD and Seagate buying up the competition), but I think you see more advancements in SSDs than HDDs. Other than for storage, I don't think many people would go back and buy a HDD for a primary/system drive.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

Yes, low capacity drives are being replaced by SSDs. I thought we've passed that phase already. Today, for my needs, anything lower than 4TB capacity isn't worth the SATA port :).

1 week ago
ChatBot

Wow you guys, I don't even own a 4TB hard-drive. My largest is 3TB. I only use SSD in my laptop computers. I decided I would use up my old HDs before buying new ones. It saves money. I purchase a large HD for storage (as you do). Then, the old storage drive becomes my new boot drive.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

"the old storage drive becomes my new boot drive" - This is just wrong :). Why not an SSD? My newest drive is 8TB.
The strategy:
In the beginning there is one data drive (HDD), let's say 2TB. While all the software is "boiling" on SSD boot drive. Then I buy a second 2TB drive and mirror the important data on both drives for redundancy (manually, no RAID is involved), while all kinds of temporary and junk data is just floating around, coming and going without backups to save space. When 2TB drive becomes too small, I get a new 4TB drive for mirroring and start filling up the second 2TB drive with new data. At some point, the data on the first 2TB drive gets old and there's nothing new going on with it. Which means that it can be removed from the system and stored somewhere safe, if you prefer. Next, when the second 2TB drive and the 4TB drive (obviously) are full, it is time to buy a new larger capacity drive, perhaps 8TB. So now I can choose what to do next ...

1 week ago*
ecka84
ecka84

... I can repeat the procedure, by mirroring all of my data on the 8TB and start filling the 4TB drive with new data. OR. I can just buy a second 8TB drive and start from the beginning. While leaving the 4TB drive full of old data in the system and storing the other two 2TB drives of copies somewhere safe.

1 week ago
sirhawkeye64

I agree with cka84. Unless you need a large system drive (boot drive) why not go SSD (you can get 500GB SSDs for around $150 for the good quality ones, like Samsung). Unless you're really on a strict budget, I don't see the point of replacing an old boot HDD with another one when you run out of space. But that's my opinion. I used to replace my system HDD every 3 years just to be safe back when spinning HDDs were a thing (and SSDs were still very new and prohibitively expensive and low capacity) but I since then have not bothered since I feel SSDs are more reliable than HDDs (all of them can and will fail at some point, but IMO without moving parts, I feel they are more "Durable" and the speed bump is definitely appreciated. But each person has their own preferences, and budgets, so I can understand if you're on a budget an a $100-150 drive puts you over your budget.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

@sirhawkeye64
HDDs tend to die gradually, which gives you a chance to backup your data or even to recover the data from a dead drive. While SSDs can just die suddenly with no prior symptoms and no possible data recovery from the fried electronics. So, when it comes to dying, HDDs are a safer bet, IMHO. Although, SSDs are less fragile.

1 week ago
Sirandar

LOL No matter how much internal storage there is .... why wouldn't you want to doble or triple it for not much cash if you are willing to wait a bit .....

Also .... popping out the microSD card and transferring 128GB of data via USB 3 reader takes minutes ..... over the crippled buggy copy protected MTP it will take many hours if it works at all ........ it may take many hours or days via Wifi if it works at all

1 week ago
cosinaphile

not sure why having lots of native memory means killing the sd card slot

is there an agenda in the air ??? i ask that seriously

1 week ago
aloli

Agenda to kill microSDs?

1 week ago
cosinaphile

yup its a google and apple thing the corporate gorillas ...

ask yourself about the title of the article and why its framed that way

yes ...an agenda

the title of this article is pure nonsense

1 week ago*
photomedium

Not so busy much are you? How nuts did you go when they introduced touchscreens and wifi?
Maybe the agenda is simply to get rid of moving parts, increase speed, move camera technology into the 21st century in an attempt to improve sales?
I mean CIPA latest figs show a further ~15% decline in camera sales in 2017...it's not like camera manufacturers are swimming in money like uncle scrooge.

1 week ago
cosinaphile

camera manufacturers ? its the cellphone makers who will hurt consumers by killing the sd slot ... like apple and google already do

moving parts ???... cellphones are already 100 percent solid state ,
with or without sd slots

1 week ago*
Karroly

@cosinaphile,
Not quite 100%. Still some moving parts :
- microphone and speaker membranes,
- camera lens (autofocus. stabilization)
- accelerometer, gyro sensors...
;-)

1 week ago*
cosinaphile

excellent ,,,,, i stand corrected .... but you got what i mean....lol

1 week ago
Michael Ma

I have 512GB of storage on my Note 8 (256GB on device + 256GB microSDXC U3 card). The storage is mostly going to waste. But I love the bragging rights. Before you say I should upgrade to the new 400GB card, that card is slow.

1 week ago*
stomrunner

It's not a matter of capacity but cost.

1 week ago
Jesse_Just_Him
Jesse_Just_Him

The BAD thing about built in storage (soldered on PCBs) is when the device fails, you loose all your data.

Removable storage, especially SD cards are a good form of last-resort backup.

If your camera only has built-in storage and you dipped it in water, it will be difficult or impossible to save your data unless you have a removable storage

1 week ago
photomedium

Aw-shucks...but aint's that true for anything else as well? If your camera falls in the lava on mount Kilauea, anything past you last backup and the camera will be gone...
are you seriously claiming that right now you store al your data on SD cards?

1 week ago
Jesse_Just_Him
Jesse_Just_Him

@photomedium Aww, and the card survives, the device don't~~~

https://nypost.com/2017/11/15/gopro-keeps-filming-after-being-engulfed-in-molten-lava/

Of course I backup most of my data on multiple SD cards since they're dirt cheap. Much more reliable than HDD in my experience

1 week ago*
photoaddict

I actually would love to see that in DSLRs. I often wish for that because I am tired of taking out the card and putting in SD slot or forgetting to put the card back in and so on. It would be nice if everything can be done wirelessly.

1 week ago
Bobthearch
Bobthearch

I have mixed feelings.
Similarly, I only use the cable for file transfer due to the possibility of forgetting to replace the SD cards. And also, I feel that built-in memory is going to be more reliable than the SD card's connectors.

But... storage media often goes bad long before the device is otherwise ready for retirement. And the device becomes limited with a fixed amount of storage.

A combination of built-in and SD storage would be best, the same as many cell phones and PDAs have done in the past. It could be set up to work as dual card slots in DSLRs currently are.

1 week ago
Lee Jay

I still haven't ever connected my current SLR to the computer via a cable. At least on all my other ones, doing that was a hassle (the rubber seal over the connectors on the camera is hard to open and reseal) and moving data was very slow (around 3MB/s). My card in my card reader can transfer data at 100MB/s and the card door is a snap to open and close.

1 week ago
Lee Jay

The Tweet for this says "desktop levels of storage".

My desktop has 4.5TB of storage. I know many people with tens of TB on their desktops.

1 week ago
Bobthearch
Bobthearch

Comparing this to "desktop storage" is silly. The whole point of desktop storage is expandability and replaceability.

1 week ago
cosinaphile

desktop levels in 2003 to 2004 perhaps ..........almost a decade and a half ago

1 week ago
Gesture

Fortunately, plenty of old-fashioned devices will be available at dirt cheap prices as folks move to the new and improved. Until the OEMs make the old devices inactive.

1 week ago
GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks

Obsolescence is automatic. You will be lucky to get a full update to the next version of android. Then some of your apps will not update because your OS is not up to date. Then the old version of the app will be depreciated because the provider does not want to support old apps.

Yup, those old devices will be dirt cheap.

1 week ago
Ebrahim Saadawi
Ebrahim Saadawi

This is good but has nothing to do with Micro SD "being a thing of the past". This is internal storage, this is removable storage. The card I use in the C100II is one currently in my phone, and have been in my laptop for a couple of months... it's removable.

That's why all my cards (15+) are Micro SD instead of SD even when I had the C100II and now the 5DIV, 70D, SL2, all used with Micro SDs with an adapter. It makes sharing between devices a complete breathe, as if they were all connected. Sometimes I take photos of a party and put the card in the TV and show the family their JPEGs on 51" monitor instantly, they love it!

A more accurate title would be " 2018 Samsung phones will double their storage" and put "might" in there for complete accuracy.

1 week ago
tangbunna

we call microSD as a "removable storage" it will not compete with built-in storage.

1 week ago
Gesture

That isn't what the article says. Internal will be boosted and removable likely no longer a feature.

1 week ago
cosinaphile

which is simply silly ... and stinks of an agenda to normalize the anti consumer behavior of google and apple for audio and storage ... they want it to spread

the acceptence of no audio jack or sd storage in comsumersd minds like a virus
to speed up the sales cycle for phones

1 week ago
Gesture

Exactly. Steve Jobs vision of closed, un-upgradeable devices.

1 week ago
entoman

Wonderful - we may finally see the arrival of cameras that can take and store thousands of RAW images or dozens of videos, without having to play around with CF, SD or CFast cards! Then we'll just have to periodically connect our cameras to our computers, or transfer our images wirelessly. Sony might even introduce this tech into the next generation of their cameras, followed 10-20 years later by Canon.

1 week ago
Gesture

Why are people so happy to give up options, like being able to remove cards whenever; share images taken among several cards; etc. Often, "inconvenience" is more powerful and secure.

1 week ago
ecka84
ecka84

Why? Can't you just buy a 512GB card right now? There are 400GB microSD cards available and you can use two of those in a single CF slot via an adapter. That would make 800GB of fast (up to UHS-I in RAID0), removable storage.

1 week ago
GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks

So when my phone suddenly dies, I will have up to 512GB of data locked and inaccessible on the phone. No thanks. The beauty of a microSD card is that I can remove it and put it into another phone, or even into my computer.

Personally, I will NOT buy any phone that does not support microSD cards, nor will I use or rely on someone's "cloud".

1 week ago
trungtran

I would love to find your phone then. All i have to do is take the SD card out, run some software and see if i there is any juicy data i can sell on the black market.

1 week ago
Karroly

@trungtran,
What will you do if the microSD card contents is encrypted ?

1 week ago
GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks

Sorry trungtran, but I use OTFE (On The Fly Encryption) for all my sensitive data, which is held in an encrypted container. My microSD card is 256GB. My encrypted container is 128GB. I also use encrypted volumns on my computer to secure my sensitive data on the computer too. The same software that I use for my encrypted hard drives can also read and write to the encrypted container on my smartphone.

For those that are interested: TrueCrypt/VeraCrypt on the computer and EDS for the phone, available in the play store (not free).

1 week ago
BJL

You do not back up the data on your phone? Apart from manual backups, mine is set to do so automatically when I am on my home WiFi network. (Going to a cloud service.)

1 week ago*
quiquae

@GodSpeaks You seem to be confident that you will recover your SD card intact from any incident that would render your phone's internal storage inaccessible. I am not completely certain that your faith in this matter is so warranted.

1 week ago
Ilia Snopchenko
Ilia Snopchenko

At least the card can be taken out of a device that has been rendered inoperable by an internal failure. I know that firsthand because it happened to me once - but I lost any data that could not have been transferred to the card, like the phonebook.

I also tend to use MicroSD cards in my camera to send photos from the field by inserting them into the phone (I'm lucky to have a model that does not require disassembly and reboot to replace cards). Of course I can connect the camera with a USB OTG cable but it's a lot less convenient in that the Canon cameras are not recognized as external storage like Nikon / Sony; I have to use the clunky picture transfer protocol with Google's rudimentary utility.

And while I'm using cloud services as well, I'd hate to have to be connected all the time and transferring loads of data back and forth without necessity.

1 week ago*
GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks

@quiquae, well, I am not completely stupid. I also do regular backups of my phone to my computer. But the thing is, that recovery of data is orders of magnitude better from an SD card than from a dead smartphone's internal storage.

1 week ago
(unknown member)

Cloud storage? With our weather? You are joking!! A removeable SD card AND 512GB of built-in storage IS what's needed. They just cannot see the way the wind's blowing.
This could and should already be the case with our "ordinary" cameras, as then the built-in storage drive can also act as a decent -sized buffer! ( As has ALWAYS been the case). I get really annoyed at having ONLY inbuilt storage, because then your kit becomes useless, unless you move everything-where? to a PC ? A 512GB built into my Nokia 1020 would be just great as the RAW files are huge, but a removeable back-up the same size would be a nice addition, because I could then transfer to cards and store the cards forever (Hopefully more stable than any drive -please check)

1 week ago
sshoihet

I use the microSD to transfer data/programs to other devices like a PLC so more built in storage isn't going to help me much.

1 week ago
Herp Photos

I for one am very tired of google and apple and others making software and hardware decisions based on the lifestyle and internet availability that the employees enjoy in silicon valley.
Not everyone is always connected to the cloud and often if you are it might be with bandwidth which makes cloud storage useless for things like searching for photos, browsing through them at full resolution and especially trying to watch a 4k video at full resolution. Also as phone cameras improve, the file sizes will only increase. Micro sd cards are much easier to transfer between phones also. Can you imagine having to copy 500gb of data from internal storage to another phone or from the cloud to another phone (for those who want offline access)
Of course not having your photos in the cloud limits their ability to study them for AI training and limits their ability to charge for cloud storage options once free limits are reached.

1 week ago
mxx
mxx

"I for one am very tired of google and apple and others making software and hardware decisions based on the lifestyle and internet availability that the employees enjoy in silicon valley. "

Well said.

1 week ago
photoaddict

It's not just that... they keep forgetting that many ISPs do impose caps on how much data can be used per month.

1 week ago
BJL

The cloud and ISOs need have nothing to do with it; backups to a home computer via WiFi or USB cable are all that is needed.

1 week ago
BJL

Whoops: “ISPs”, not “ISOs”

1 week ago
Jake2046

Yeah, along with the price of the phone. Honestly, I rather have the SD slot so I can buy the microSD for much cheaper. And if the phone dies...I can use it on the new phone.

1 week ago
Dr Blackjack

The thing that will made SD slots redundant is not more storage on the device, it's super fast, seamless, and cheap cloud storage.

1 week ago
GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks

No. not true. Not everyone wants to rely on the "cloud". I know I don't.

1 week ago
blackcoffee17
blackcoffee17

Not everyone lives in the center of the big city with high speed unlimited broadband. And people travel, sometimes for longer periods and have no access to high speed internet.

1 week ago
entoman

Aetheist speaks, and agrees with GodSpeaks.

1 week ago
cosinaphile

the cloud sucks ... another scam to monetize phone usage behavior and make your data available to prying eyes

6 days ago
entoman

cosinaphile - Absolutely agree. No one actually NEEDs the cloud, and very few people actually want it. It's just a huge scam. Fortunately, at the moment, it's still very easy to find cheaper, safer and better non-cloud storage and retrieval solutions.

6 days ago*
cosinaphile

yes to all,

I dont object to users doing an overnight upload to a server that can give a backup in the event of catastrophic loss of data [or multi-yr data accumulation]
the idea of the"cloud" being something you"just use" to retrieve everyday data films music photos etc is simply LUDICROUS.
your data is exactly that, your data... accessing GB back & forth from the cloud hen it can be as close as an sd card [ 256 gb permanently for $129 ] serve the phone maker and or service provider
i think google & apple have identical agendas concerning the audio port & user owned mass storage & it has its roots in the ongoing goal to monetize anything they can, even the act of living a day to day existence, or upgrade cycles
having no sd slot advances those corporate goals, and increases the likelihood that users will upgrade phones frequently,
ditto the audio jack as the data access ports will be scrapped & replaced every 5 yrs or so also prompting phone replacement

i vote with my wallet

6 days ago*
entoman

Yes, sometimes there are *better* storage solutions (heaven forbid we would still be using floppies or CDs, and I'll be glad when CF is phased out), BUT the important thing is to have control over your own images, and the only way to do that is to store locally.

I fully understand concerns that images can be permanently lost if your house burns down or your computer is stolen or suffers catastrophic failure, and this scaremongering is what Apple, Adobe, Google etc hope will persuade everyone to use cloud storage.

The simple solution is to back up daily (in my case hourly) to either a pair of portable drives (2TB portables are less than $100) or to a RAID system. One drive then stays permanently connected, and the other is taken with you when you are away on holiday or on assignment.

6 days ago*
Total: 65, showing: 1 – 50
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