Shot on iPhone 6s by Mariko Klug.

Apple is launching its 2019 'Shot on iPhone' photo contest by inviting iPhone photographers to submit their best photographs shot on an Apple device. Photos can be submitted from now to February 7th and will be judged by an impressive panel including photographer Pete Souza and Annet de Graaf, as well as Apple's VP of Marketing Phil Schiller and head of camera software team Jon McCormack. Apple says winning images will be featured on billboards in select cities, Apple retail stores and online.

Shot on iPhone 6 by Mandy Blake.

To participate you can post images on Instagram or Twitter using the hashtag #ShotOniPhone. In the image caption you should note which iPhone model it was captured with. Alternatively images can be submitted by emailing them in full resolution to shotoniphone@apple.com with the file format ‘firstname_lastname_iphonemodel.' Photos can be straight out of the camera or edited.

If you're thinking about submitting your photos you should probably have a look at official rules on the Apple website, to make sure you know what participation in the contest means for your images. Photographers are essentially handing over exclusive commercial ownership of their images in exchange for photo credit. In a post on Reddit, photographer Trevor Mahlmann shared his thoughts on the campaign and the issues he noticed with the fine print.

Shot on iPhone 7 by Erdem Summak.

In the fine print Apple says: 'you retain your rights to your photograph; however, by submitting your photo, you grant Apple a royalty-free, world-wide, irrevocable, non-exclusive license for one year to use, modify, publish, display, distribute, create derivative works from and reproduce the photo on Apple Newsroom, apple.com, Twitter, Instagram, in Apple retail stores, Weibo, WeChat, on billboards and any Apple internal exhibitions. Any photograph reproduced will include a photographer credit.'

The company goes on to say: 'If your photo is selected to be featured on a billboard, you further agree to grant Apple exclusive commercial use of the photo for the life of the license.'