Barney Britton

Barney Britton

DPReview Administrator
Lives in United States Seattle, United States
Works as a Editor
Has a website at www.dpreview.com
Joined on Nov 2, 2009
About me:

I'm in charge of the editorial content of dpreview. I joined dpreview when it was based in London in November 2009, after several years as a print journalist in the UK specialist photographic press. I moved from London to Seattle, USA, a year later and I've been here ever since.

Comments

Total: 3643, showing: 81 – 100
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On article Leica M10 in Japan: Updated samples gallery (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

engbert: I did not find the aperture used in these pix.

Wide aperture shots on the 35mm F1.4 Summilux were mostly taken at F2, portraits on all lenses were mostly at F4, and anything where everything is in focus was mostly F5.6 or F8. I hope this helps...

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 18:41 UTC
On a photo in the Leica M10 real-world samples (pre-production) sample gallery (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

rev32: What f stops are these image captured at?

The camera doesn't report them, so I'd be guessing, quite honestly. This one is probably F1.4 or F2.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 04:20 UTC
In reply to:

WookieLala: MFT the first mirorless camera system? Was it not preceded by the Leica M8?

Rangefinders have mirrors inside them...

(walks away slowly....)

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 00:33 UTC
In reply to:

Contra Mundum: And the elephant in the room: why all those sacrifices if one could have easily taken all those pictures with one of many FF cameras or even APS-Cs?

Patience, children, patience ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 01:24 UTC
In reply to:

Contra Mundum: And the elephant in the room: why all those sacrifices if one could have easily taken all those pictures with one of many FF cameras or even APS-Cs?

"What is a compelling use case?"

How's about this for a compelling use-case - getting our hands on a brand-new camera that our audience is very interested in. Saying 'nah, we'll wait till we get back to Seattle to shoot it - we could take street photographs on an iPhone' and putting the GFX in the hotel safe would be a little daft, don't you think?

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 22:16 UTC
In reply to:

Beckler8: Enough of the high-resolution richly full-bearded men - apparently that's the only subject which can be photographed with the GH5. Some people prefer not to hurl their breakfast onto their computer monitor. :D

He rides a motorcycle, too.

He rides it ironically.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 20:24 UTC
In reply to:

Contra Mundum: And the elephant in the room: why all those sacrifices if one could have easily taken all those pictures with one of many FF cameras or even APS-Cs?

Because the elephant isn't actually in the room. The only non medium format camera on the market with this resolution is the Canon EOS 5DS/R, and the GFX 50S offers greater dynamic range, which is very useful in many situations.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 19:48 UTC
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I was wondering when you guys were going to go to Tokyo, when you're already in Yokohama. I wouldn't schelpp a medium format camera for walk around shots, let alone in the rain, but the quality is great. Here's to v.2 with faster focusing.

It's about 30mins on the train - pretty close.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 19:20 UTC
In reply to:

obsolescence: Too contrasty for me. Will we ever get to see a direct comparison vs. Nikon D810?

Sure, we're working on studio comparisons right now.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 19:19 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: "I really enjoy limiting my focal length when traveling, it tends to give me more mental clarity into what I'm seeing and forces me to move my feet and change my perspective more."........ Such wise words!

Must admit to being a bit disappointed, perhaps my expectations were too high, but AF that is slow, noisy and hunts, and an EVF that is "crunchy" and "shimmering" would put me off of this camera, despite the gorgeous image quality and apparent excellent ergonomics. How would you say it compares to the Hassy, Dan?

It's only really crunchy during the process of AF acquisition, when (presumably) the data readout from the sensor to the finder is reduced. In general it's a perfectly pleasant window on the world.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 18:18 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1567 comments in total)
In reply to:

mrukphoto: Disappointed it is not compared to A99 for image quality Is it worth getting over the A99 as I was going to buy that until this A99ii came out for landscape photography. The A99 gives better res images than Canon or Nikon as good as the 810 so how does the A99ii compare should out gun them and D810 by a mile but you do not say. So is it worth me spending twice the money on the A99ii over the older A99 Rishi can you please comment.

What David said.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 22:18 UTC
In reply to:

Beckler8: Enough of the high-resolution richly full-bearded men - apparently that's the only subject which can be photographed with the GH5. Some people prefer not to hurl their breakfast onto their computer monitor. :D

'Damn hippies, with their beards and their flared trousers.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 18:27 UTC
In reply to:

Beckler8: Enough of the high-resolution richly full-bearded men - apparently that's the only subject which can be photographed with the GH5. Some people prefer not to hurl their breakfast onto their computer monitor. :D

If pictures of beards make you vomit, I think your problems may be beyond our capacity to solve...

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 17:44 UTC
In reply to:

George Zip: I enjoyed that. Thank you. Barney, you should consider doing some oddball stuff and becoming the American equivalent of Louis Theroux. Maybe a story about Internet Forums ;-)

Ooof - not sure I have the stomach for that.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 05:17 UTC
In reply to:

Paul B Jones: Lovely and informative all around, but it is particularly nice to watch a video where no one is shouting.

You got there before me (whoever you are).

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 01:10 UTC
On article CP+ 2017: a taste of the show (16 comments in total)
In reply to:

justmeMN: Did DPR do a CP+ interview with Nikon executives? I'm curious to learn what they have to say for themselves.

We didn't this year, I'm afraid. Sorry. We did ask.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 00:29 UTC
On article CP+ 2017: a taste of the show (16 comments in total)
In reply to:

bed bug: Rolled up cuffs when out in the 1970's!

Keeps 'em out of the mud.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 00:29 UTC
In reply to:

Mariano Pacifico: Before you run to your nearest cam store you have to ask "Was it really shot by EOS M5"? Just cynical.

All of the stills and much of the video (where indicated).

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 21:55 UTC
In reply to:

noflashplease: The subjects of this article aren't "photojournalists," as much as participating activists posing as photojournalists. This phenomenon is becoming increasingly common in recent years and has undermined legitimate journalism.

Looking at the history of socially aware photo journalism, people like Jacob Riis could manage to produce content that was economically viable, as well as topical. In contrast, the current crop of "photojournalists" are just following personal hobbies, without any broader relevance to the work, aside from their own marginal and economically irrelevant special interest groups. Hanging a camera around your neck while participating in a protest doesn't make you photojournalist, just a protester with a camera.

These people are professional photojournalists. If you've read the article you'd know that. Is there some aspect of that role that you're unclear on, or are you just trolling?

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 17:54 UTC
In reply to:

noflashplease: The subjects of this article aren't "photojournalists," as much as participating activists posing as photojournalists. This phenomenon is becoming increasingly common in recent years and has undermined legitimate journalism.

Looking at the history of socially aware photo journalism, people like Jacob Riis could manage to produce content that was economically viable, as well as topical. In contrast, the current crop of "photojournalists" are just following personal hobbies, without any broader relevance to the work, aside from their own marginal and economically irrelevant special interest groups. Hanging a camera around your neck while participating in a protest doesn't make you photojournalist, just a protester with a camera.

Are you serious?

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 17:27 UTC
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