NarrBL

Lives in US Minor Outlying Islands US Minor Outlying Islands
Joined on Jun 6, 2003

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On article Phase One introduces 'Styles Packs' for Capture One (62 comments in total)
In reply to:

NarrBL: I'm late to this, unfortunately, as I think there's considerable misunderstanding of the potential value of presets. Although I do agree the price should be lower, so that more could have the advantage.

Capture One is most of all about subtlety, and this doesn't finish with the original results that many appreciate.

If you try on some of their excellent video lessons from differing professionals, you can get a real sense of the value in color grading, as an approach. You go for the best base image you can, of course. But then, the ability to quickly scan through a wide group of presets often can really show something.

I think the key is that these presets aren't simple color washes. Instead, they combine emphases, as well as gamma and exposure 'shoulder' treatments. The result is that you can find surprising emphasis of what may well be hiding, which can very much bring out the interest in a shot.

(more)

Of course mood itself can be important also, and here the consistency of presets surely can be a big help for a display or publishing layout.

A lot of discovery in both, and likely in other views. Capture One is particularly adept as a tool to find these, with both the 'scan through' ability of the presets, and its freeing variants creation enhancing also making a final selection. Then, as easy to group apply to all the images out of a shoot as you want -- as variants also, instantly arranged.

I just did this, using the CM03 sample filter, on some late afternoon snaps around a coastal town. The originals weren't bad, but this brought out much more flavor of the moment, more depth dimensionality, and also the brilliance of many flowers -- without disturbing the sky or smoothness.

I think this you will not easily find such balances with sliders, nor be prepared as often to take the advantage.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 07:47 UTC
On article Phase One introduces 'Styles Packs' for Capture One (62 comments in total)

I'm late to this, unfortunately, as I think there's considerable misunderstanding of the potential value of presets. Although I do agree the price should be lower, so that more could have the advantage.

Capture One is most of all about subtlety, and this doesn't finish with the original results that many appreciate.

If you try on some of their excellent video lessons from differing professionals, you can get a real sense of the value in color grading, as an approach. You go for the best base image you can, of course. But then, the ability to quickly scan through a wide group of presets often can really show something.

I think the key is that these presets aren't simple color washes. Instead, they combine emphases, as well as gamma and exposure 'shoulder' treatments. The result is that you can find surprising emphasis of what may well be hiding, which can very much bring out the interest in a shot.

(more)

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 07:34 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On article Shooting experience: how the Nikon D7500 won me over (193 comments in total)

Dan, just want to compliment here. That painterly eye is really showing, always gives a smile. You make real interest with it, and the pleasure that art is.

You're doing it with what accounts these days as a mid-level camera, also.

I don't imagine there's anything DPReview can sensibly do about the degree of persons venting their frustrations, in seemingly all directions these days.

But what you and the other staff do is most worthwhile in the face of it. You are going where interest is, and where expression is improved by the work others make to advance technologies. Levers for the mind, and the heart even.

It occurs to me that bringing in a lively anthropologist, to talk about our extensions moving us through time and the world, might not be off the mark. A chance to better understand, and appreciate, ourselves.

You can talk it over with Barney, who also does his interesting journeys, and by no means alone, either...all of you have a great, quiet thing going.

Best, my friend.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 04:40 UTC as 15th comment | 2 replies
On article Updated: Sony a9 samples with Raw support (450 comments in total)
In reply to:

chshooter: Great! 20fps that gives you photos that have to be all edited and adjusted for white balance because the colours​ are off. Just want professional photographers want

Have to say, as meant to, that I've been enjoying more and more of your photos in recent months' galleries, look to see what you've done.

Not a bribe :) And I quite enjoy the personalities and arts that come through individually from the staff persons each who are now contributing. It adds, in this time of things new and very welcome from DPReview. Thanks all...

Link | Posted on May 8, 2017 at 05:04 UTC
On article Updated: Sony a9 samples with Raw support (450 comments in total)
In reply to:

chshooter: Great! 20fps that gives you photos that have to be all edited and adjusted for white balance because the colours​ are off. Just want professional photographers want

Carey, I hope you'll try Capture One Pro, along with Rishi.

Possible it could be an eye-opener, no?

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 23:26 UTC
In reply to:

Photo Pete: Personally I'd prefer one button for custom mode recall, with the option to scroll a dial to select which mode is being recalled. It may take a fraction of a second longer but it would leave the other buttons free to be assigned to other functions I would like to directly access.

Alternatively I would prefer to have the custom modes on the mode dial so that I can see exactly what settings I'm in before picking up the camera.

Sprawling custom mode buttons all over the camera is not necessarily an improvement and unfortunately reporting on it as being a significant advantage to Sony is a little bit silly, undermining dpreviews appearance of impartiality.

The A9 is clearly a very capable camera and this sort of blind worship from a review site is not doing it any real favours...

Watch out for protesting too much, Rishi.

And how you take others to task...

Editorially, all this detailed enthusiasm for what Sony's tech can deliver is tough to balance, no question. Keeping level heads in several senses must form a good bit of that, no?

On the other hand, I remember Phil Askey's tribune to big Canons of the day, with all their imaging flaws we can allow to understand now. While innovators like Sigma and Minolta were thoughtlesslylplowed under.

I don't dislike Phil, and I do rather like what you are doing now. It's the humor and human interest of so many shoots and videos that are the real leavening for degrees of enthusiasms, and there one could only enjoy more.

Thus, also quite well done, Barney...

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 21:33 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Minolta DiMAGE X (134 comments in total)

A smile for this article for sure. I had one of these just getting back into photography, living in Switzerland. Many, many memorable shots, including ones in night Fasnacht parades, where the autofocus was so slow that you just panned with the walkers, waiting for the camera to go off. But again, useful and sometimes striking results.

Looking at the samples makes you think of old days and Ektachrome. But at the time, just a little tweaking with Photoshop gave quite a nice look. And the camera actually lasted for many years.

I forgive Phil Askey his rating -- he was too busy those days not explaining how Canon DSLRS just mudded out small details in landscapes or even cruise ship images. And the fan 'discussions' rolled on...

Thanks again. This was great.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 00:51 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

tailings: Amusing, but too obvious. It's a joke, but who have you fooled?

...but that was the funniest part...

I think we need something past the bear necessities here, @tailings

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2017 at 09:46 UTC

This was interesting -- and definitely including Barney's honest stand-behind.

I remember choosing for an original OM-1 (film) two lenses which turned out entirely appropriate: f2.8 each, a 35mm and 100mm also from Olympus.

Both of these were tiny by present standards, and entirely suitable to this camera, so much smaller and lighter than the Nikon that preceded it before being left behind in a taxicab travellling away from Korea. Of course it was the film in the bag i missed most.

These two and the camera were a wonderful combination. I know I had chosen for what I felt two natural ranges were that my unaccompanied eye seemed to see: the general sense and the attention-focused sense of a scene.

I wonder if this framing reason doesn't line up with the way most staff choices turned out?

Anyway, thanks for sharing -- enjoyed.....

And I just realized, the same focal length range nearly fits my XZ-2 of today also.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 19:34 UTC as 109th comment
In reply to:

stadlereric: You have to applaud Nikon for their subject tracking capabilities. I shoot an A7RII and the subject tracking pales in comparison to a friends D500. Why can't a mirrorless camera subject track like a DSLR? The mirrorless gets access to the data more of the time than the DSLR right?

Seems there surely could be an alternate readout mode with much lower resolution information - just some of the rows and columns of pixels. Maybe Sony and otehr mirrorless will come to do something of the sort.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 02:47 UTC

Well, Dan, that eye...

Fresh venue in this lens brings it well...

There's one subject we miss, maybe later.

These are very fine, many of them.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2017 at 01:16 UTC as 36th comment
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

Flashback: To get this level of creamy bokeh with a conventional lens, you'd probably have to go Leica Noctilux.

That's going to cost you 6x times the price and suffer a degree of softness wide open. In its favour however, it's much smaller and maintains its speed.

Androole, that's interesting.

How would you avoid the image itself vignetting, though?

May be able to compensate in post, perhaps, as it would not be as severe as some I worked out by better fitting a filter mount...

(Edited back out that iPad had made you Androcles, if you may enjoy that ;) )

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 21:11 UTC

As you might suspect, these are mainly sketches and an example painting or two from historical artists, but these are very valuable for study -- you can download or browser-peruse quite detailed images a link or two beneath each work.

The Rijksmuseet is also represented on this Creative Commons page -- bravo indeed for museums opening their basements this way, Ab.

Which recalls one of the richest experiences of the National Gallery in London, that down an obscure staircase or two was such a basement, so many truly interesting not-approved-by-the-reigning-bishop pieces, all hung with no margins on schooll bulletin-board style stands, rows and rows of them. I can still recall some visual images...

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 20:28 UTC as 5th comment
On a photo in the Nikon D5600 sample gallery sample gallery (1 comment in total)

Wow. That is a great image, Wenmei. In each of several aspects.

Thanks for sharing...

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2017 at 03:16 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

NarrBL: Allison, it is great to see these, if it would be useful to also include one or two visible before of the desert outposts that the camps were. There were also photos of families in them, who were not so badly treated there at least, if losing rights of citizenship and their livelihoods and their freedom were not their larger fate. It was good at least to see how they lived.

There's an interesting novel which borders on the camps and explores the general feelings, complicated, with Nisei (second generation) and later citizen; families, which is Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson.

The U.S. government did not understand any breadth Japanese culture or its possible reasonings, thus hired top anthropologist Ruth Benedict of the University of California to study and illuminate, resulting in her justly famous and fascinating The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, which is very well worth reading.

(cont'd)

At the same time, there were the submarines off the coast, and the general aggressiveness of attempt to silence America for South Pacific acquisitions. So, a hard point to judge -- especially in a time when few could understand their new citizens.

David Guterson's story, and even the film made of its outline, to some extent, with fine actors such as Max von Sydow, show the way the character of immigrant Japanese was so often sturdy and solid, self-evident, here around lives dedicated around fishing. Time spent for either of them would be richly returned.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 06:52 UTC
In reply to:

NarrBL: Allison, it is great to see these, if it would be useful to also include one or two visible before of the desert outposts that the camps were. There were also photos of families in them, who were not so badly treated there at least, if losing rights of citizenship and their livelihoods and their freedom were not their larger fate. It was good at least to see how they lived.

There's an interesting novel which borders on the camps and explores the general feelings, complicated, with Nisei (second generation) and later citizen; families, which is Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson.

The U.S. government did not understand any breadth Japanese culture or its possible reasonings, thus hired top anthropologist Ruth Benedict of the University of California to study and illuminate, resulting in her justly famous and fascinating The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, which is very well worth reading.

(cont'd)

In some senses the Japanese can teach us well, how complicated truly all of we humans are, especially any who think they are somehow straightforward. There's a great point in Ruth Benedict's book, however, which is that once going to America, even the Issei (first generation) parents had firmly shut the door, or had it shut for them, to the possibility of ever joining the Japanese culture again. Thus, they tended to be entirely decicated to their American lives, as visible in the hardworking and honorably worked professions they joined, much of it in farming, which put them beside many, many Americans in their time.

Of course there were a few spies sent over, not to mention the foreign service persons in Washington -- but real ones would disguise, surely, and they could pose as Chinese, Hawaiian, and so forth, hardly likelly to allow themselves to be rounded up.

cont'd once more...

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 06:51 UTC

Allison, it is great to see these, if it would be useful to also include one or two visible before of the desert outposts that the camps were. There were also photos of families in them, who were not so badly treated there at least, if losing rights of citizenship and their livelihoods and their freedom were not their larger fate. It was good at least to see how they lived.

There's an interesting novel which borders on the camps and explores the general feelings, complicated, with Nisei (second generation) and later citizen; families, which is Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson.

The U.S. government did not understand any breadth Japanese culture or its possible reasonings, thus hired top anthropologist Ruth Benedict of the University of California to study and illuminate, resulting in her justly famous and fascinating The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, which is very well worth reading.

(cont'd)

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 06:51 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies
On article Fast Five: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V Review (423 comments in total)
In reply to:

valenttin: More than five years ago I buy Olympus XZ1. After so much time (and after so much technical evolution) my expectations was to find that camera, with those specifications, at a somehow similar price, even if the sensor is 1". But is more than double. So, don't judge me for my big NO...

A bit of a smear job (no pun) on the XZ-1, surely.

I shoot an XZ-2, which has wonderful image quality, and there are many who are very enthusiastic on the XZ-1, some even by comparison.

The pity is only that the gorilla entered the market, so that Olympus didn't pursue the "1in-type" XZ-3.

Which by the way would have continued a very usable and capable touch screen, among the other finely thought out aspects of the design, serving all levels of photographic ability and interest.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 00:24 UTC
On article Fast Five: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V Review (423 comments in total)
In reply to:

amatoer: Cons: 'Green yellows & cool greens in JPEG aren't the most pleasing'

One could perhaps add: Maybe not so good for JPG-shooters and unskilled RAW-shooters, where pleasant color (accuracy) may be the most important aspect of a camera. More than bells and whistles.

I'm probably falling into the forum trap (drain?), but...

Why on earth is it that so many don't seem to realize they can _adjust_ the default JPEG colors once to suit their tastes, and then enjoy whatever it is they like without attention?

Each manufacturer provides these, and if I remember, the Sony ones are particularly nicely arranged.

Makers assign base color tendencies according to their own tastes, which are often regional, having to do with actual skin tones as well as traditional differences in 'look' from early photography. This is particularly so in Asia, and not less with the feeling that their home markets are becoming very important -- just as has been true before in the 'west'.

It was the same with many film brands. I could ask why they don't tune for each market, but then we are on another subject, the tendencies of corporations.

I would say, buck up, live in the world as it is, and first adjust that precision instrument you buy -- then enjoy it.

No?

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 00:11 UTC
On a photo in the Panasonic Lumix G85 sample gallery sample gallery (1 comment in total)

Must say, it's very nice to keep seeing 'that girl' again, and with her smile quite returned... ;)

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2016 at 20:52 UTC as 1st comment
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