NarrBL

Lives in US Minor Outlying Islands US Minor Outlying Islands
Joined on Jun 6, 2003

Comments

Total: 199, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Review: Affinity Photo 1.5.2 for desktop (292 comments in total)
In reply to:

NarrBL: I've recently had a chance to appreciate how much better Affinity's Healing Brush is than the one in Photoshop CS6.

I was removing rust stains from a stucco building front below seaside flower boxes, hence the rust. Cloning not appropriate due to gradation and the variegated surface.

With PS, just could not get a clean job -- the dark box bottom kept being drawn into the healed area.

Switching to Affinity, a great difference. Their's is a much more precise tool, which doesn't try to insist what nearby has to be pulled in -- and most of all, has a 'window' on the brush area, so you can see exactly what you are going to get. I finished in a few quick strokes.

Affinity is I think justly proud of their imaging math being better, and this of the user experience certainly is. I would definitely support the idea others state, of using Capture One 10 as a main developing tool, and Affinity for touchup beyond the things C1 already does interestingly well in its Local Adjustment layers.

Well, one would hope -- that was a promise made. I at least haven't seen much movement.

And 5 years -- I would have paid $3000 for the privilege, on the package I have. You see why I wasn't interested. And truly, InDesign, Illustrator, Fireworks (since deleted by Adobe), and Photoshop work just fine without subscriptions.

Capture One, however, moves ahead in strides, and gives wonderful results. It's organized around perceptions, more than technical methods, by comparison, I think.

My experience may suggest that pairing Affinity in may give a very useful toolset.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2017 at 21:11 UTC
On article Review: Affinity Photo 1.5.2 for desktop (292 comments in total)

I've recently had a chance to appreciate how much better Affinity's Healing Brush is than the one in Photoshop CS6.

I was removing rust stains from a stucco building front below seaside flower boxes, hence the rust. Cloning not appropriate due to gradation and the variegated surface.

With PS, just could not get a clean job -- the dark box bottom kept being drawn into the healed area.

Switching to Affinity, a great difference. Their's is a much more precise tool, which doesn't try to insist what nearby has to be pulled in -- and most of all, has a 'window' on the brush area, so you can see exactly what you are going to get. I finished in a few quick strokes.

Affinity is I think justly proud of their imaging math being better, and this of the user experience certainly is. I would definitely support the idea others state, of using Capture One 10 as a main developing tool, and Affinity for touchup beyond the things C1 already does interestingly well in its Local Adjustment layers.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2017 at 04:32 UTC as 54th comment | 3 replies
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)
In reply to:

NarrBL: That's a fine set of images you've added today, Carey. Much appreciated looking through them for their expression, as well as what this top-capability camera can deliver.

I found myself more than a little amazed by the people who commented -- and marked better - the blacked-out rejectables which this camera's abilities let you draw out to their real-life result by taking the development step actually very natural to photography..

Having lived many years in this country where you took them, the developed versions are how such a scenes will look to the eyes, when there in person. This is especially true in the one later in the series, looking down a staight road through a late afternoon forest.

In fact, if anything, your work this way through the sets is a little on the dark side, while this surely is a matter of taste -- and of our chance to make images as we saw or want to express remembrance of them.

Well, I think you should go on seeking truth your own way, fPrime, and I in mine.
It's best, no?

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 04:06 UTC
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)
In reply to:

panchorancho: Normally DPReview sample images are deplorable, but in this case the D850 actually makes the photographs look decent. Bravo Nikon for making even the simple neophyte photographer take proper photos!

In the hands a true professional, the D850 will create timeless art!

Well, I take pity, after all, but couldn't remove.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 01:09 UTC
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)
In reply to:

moimoi: Nice set of photos. However, I am really not that keen on the yellowish skin tones. I suspect it can be processed quite easily, but the natural warmth from Nikon is not that appealing for portrait photography. Great for landscapes though as it add extra pop!

And, moimoi, you might consider that's pretty evidently not a Northern Irish baby...

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 00:50 UTC
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)
In reply to:

panchorancho: Normally DPReview sample images are deplorable, but in this case the D850 actually makes the photographs look decent. Bravo Nikon for making even the simple neophyte photographer take proper photos!

In the hands a true professional, the D850 will create timeless art!

I wonder if those who write the poster's kind of comments realize how utterly childish it makes them look?

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 00:47 UTC
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hugo808: Not too shabby. I doubt anyone will find much to complain about here. Maybe....

Well, you are the optimist, Hugo :)

I appreciate the sentiment entirely...have it good

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 00:44 UTC
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)
In reply to:

NarrBL: That's a fine set of images you've added today, Carey. Much appreciated looking through them for their expression, as well as what this top-capability camera can deliver.

I found myself more than a little amazed by the people who commented -- and marked better - the blacked-out rejectables which this camera's abilities let you draw out to their real-life result by taking the development step actually very natural to photography..

Having lived many years in this country where you took them, the developed versions are how such a scenes will look to the eyes, when there in person. This is especially true in the one later in the series, looking down a staight road through a late afternoon forest.

In fact, if anything, your work this way through the sets is a little on the dark side, while this surely is a matter of taste -- and of our chance to make images as we saw or want to express remembrance of them.

For me, that's what photography is about, long before getting into any postmodern territory, and the blind following of what a non-humanized sensor shows is the actually distorted reality people can get so upset about.

I quite appreciate the expanded breadth of articles here in DP Review which explore this humanity via camera-expressive takes on subjects.

And for your editors must say, that is as much as I really don't appreciate the more recent dives into egotistical and political articles exploiting tabloid takes on ' strange things that happen around photography'.

New authors , ok -- as you guys are -- but not those encouraged to make noise and seek attention this way. As is visible, it doesn't help the quality of commentary here either.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 00:37 UTC
On article Updated: Nikon D850 sample gallery (317 comments in total)

That's a fine set of images you've added today, Carey. Much appreciated looking through them for their expression, as well as what this top-capability camera can deliver.

I found myself more than a little amazed by the people who commented -- and marked better - the blacked-out rejectables which this camera's abilities let you draw out to their real-life result by taking the development step actually very natural to photography..

Having lived many years in this country where you took them, the developed versions are how such a scenes will look to the eyes, when there in person. This is especially true in the one later in the series, looking down a staight road through a late afternoon forest.

In fact, if anything, your work this way through the sets is a little on the dark side, while this surely is a matter of taste -- and of our chance to make images as we saw or want to express remembrance of them.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 00:36 UTC as 38th comment | 3 replies
On a photo in the Nikon D850 sample gallery sample gallery (5 comments in total)

Still, having lived many years in this country, the developed version is how such a scene will look to the eyes, when there in person.

In fact, if anything Carey's work this way through the sets is on the dark side.

You have to appreciate eyes -- and that digital camera images need their development, in order to present fairly what we appreciated.

The fact that they do is that manufacturers are reluctant to give settings that actually mimic film or those eyes -- maybe because human judgement is needed still, but also perhaps too much due to the technocentric urge of certain customers to display 'knowledge' that denies the richer flavours of life actual in our perceptions.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 00:01 UTC as 1st comment
On article Hands on: Nikon D850 (372 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Tam: The Camera Store guys fired off the D850 in their latest video and the D850 sounds just as loud as previous Nikons . It's a big reason I bought mirrorless. Even the D750 quiet mode is loud.

I am glad Nikon is finally releasing a camera that has similar buzz as the D3 in 2007 and D1 back in 1999. But the benefits of a quiet/silent shutter have helped my photography way more than megapixels/fps because many of the situations I often cover do not welcome loud shutters. I hope Nikon introduces something similar to Sony a9 soon.

If you want to catch the best expressions on faces, those are truly fleeting.

I've come to really appreciate the rapid modes, a lot.

Apparently HCB took a lot of frames also...

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2017 at 03:16 UTC

Have a look at some of his photographs.
Have a look at how women and girls are treated in them. And others.
Notice that this whole smokey fire is started by cheating
How? By publishing confidential notes before a judgement is finished.

http://www.billfrakes.com/moments/

Something doesn't look at all fair here.
Some persons clearly wanted to get out ahead of decisions.
Evidently, this fellow comes across as quite masculine, of a type that bothers some.
I have no idea what he did or didn't do. How do you?
Can you escape today's automatic social response?
I feel it was very unwise for DPReview to join a rush to outside judgement.
He has a family, as the photos will teach.
Consider them, to begin to frame another view.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2017 at 04:05 UTC as 22nd comment

If you were wondering how 'limited' free HitFilm might (not) be -- or how limited your free time could get if you play with it, have a look here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7hNaJ1sDQY

before someone complains, yes, they used one inexpensive effect, but also told how to do it with no purchases at all.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 10:36 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Nikon 8-15mm F3.5-4.5E ED fisheye zoom sample gallery (65 comments in total)

On another note, this is reminding me somehow of how well I enjoyed a much milder fisheye borrowed for a day's journey, after seeing what that guy up in Alaska, James Mason, could do with one as a journalistic photographer.

Also it is much easier to de-fisheye, keeping an amount of wide, when you want that.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 03:13 UTC as 6th comment
On article Nikon 8-15mm F3.5-4.5E ED fisheye zoom sample gallery (65 comments in total)

This is really giving your shapes/patterns/colors eye new fields, isn't it, Dan.

I continue to enjoy it...quite a lot; and wherever it shows, the sense of it jump right out.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 03:10 UTC as 7th comment

I've been liking HitFilm Express, also free. Besides working well, it's pleasant that you can get minor or larger additions to it for fair prices.

I've also still got DaVinci Resolve -- it seemed to me that many, many of the useful abilities are not locked, but producing preventative overlays on the video. So, you can try them, but not use them. Fair enough, but good to know before diving in.

Two people complaining this Avid thing broke their machines, Mac and Win? Think to pass on that adventure, and not from naïveté...

ShotCut may need a tryout -- since it has a Norwegian Bokmål translation... :)

p.s. be sure to watch out for all the big colorful false Download buttons all over ShotCut, not just on the first download page you encounter.

They are all come-ons. The real downloads are text with links under them.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 02:56 UTC as 16th comment
In reply to:

Biowizard: Sad to think that collectors in 90 years' time from now, on finding a Canon or Nikon DSLR, will find not film, but a little memory chip for which, likely as not, there will be no available reading hardware.

Brian

He future is Cloudy, would think...

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2017 at 09:06 UTC
In reply to:

Thematic: How is it that these scanners are confused so easily when items are in one bin? Can anyone explain this? Last trip I (and everyone around me needed 4 bins) it was getting ridiculous.

One bin for shoes.
One bin for belt and other pocket items.
One bin for tablet and phone.
One bin for laptop.
Then the carry-on bag.

If we add this camera bin many travelers are now at 4 or 5 bins.

And guess what happened once people were at the gates....announcements for lost items was like a laundry list of travelers....DOZENS of people called back to collect items.

The billions of dollars of lost time and wages to economies has to be staggering.

maybe, three dimension and the possibility of shadowing from a second item. Those x-rays are not exactly easy to interpret anyway, if you watch.

Plus, just possibly, discouragement of anything that makes their job harder?

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2017 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

Dave: Boy do I feel safe.

Details:

Caps on or off?

Extra lenses too?

Flash?

When it comes to airborne weapons, no-one has any humor.

I can remember being posted on military flight in early 1970s, when signs warned you about making jokes, and there were no-tell leave-here bins in the rest rooms for soldiers who'd brought along something.

At Schipol (Amsterdam) I had an experience much like yours with a 1990s tone dialer I needed then for some reason, maybe cellphones that wouldn't do tones -- a small keypad with sound. As you, i started to touch the keys to show the woman, and she became very excited indeed. You can understand, given the similarity to keypad detonators favored then in films as the 'distanced yet powerful evil touch'.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2017 at 23:47 UTC
On article Phase One introduces 'Styles Packs' for Capture One (62 comments in total)
In reply to:

NarrBL: I'm late to this, unfortunately, as I think there's considerable misunderstanding of the potential value of presets. Although I do agree the price should be lower, so that more could have the advantage.

Capture One is most of all about subtlety, and this doesn't finish with the original results that many appreciate.

If you try on some of their excellent video lessons from differing professionals, you can get a real sense of the value in color grading, as an approach. You go for the best base image you can, of course. But then, the ability to quickly scan through a wide group of presets often can really show something.

I think the key is that these presets aren't simple color washes. Instead, they combine emphases, as well as gamma and exposure 'shoulder' treatments. The result is that you can find surprising emphasis of what may well be hiding, which can very much bring out the interest in a shot.

(more)

Of course mood itself can be important also, and here the consistency of presets surely can be a big help for a display or publishing layout.

A lot of discovery in both, and likely in other views. Capture One is particularly adept as a tool to find these, with both the 'scan through' ability of the presets, and its freeing variants creation enhancing also making a final selection. Then, as easy to group apply to all the images out of a shoot as you want -- as variants also, instantly arranged.

I just did this, using the CM03 sample filter, on some late afternoon snaps around a coastal town. The originals weren't bad, but this brought out much more flavor of the moment, more depth dimensionality, and also the brilliance of many flowers -- without disturbing the sky or smoothness.

I think this you will not easily find such balances with sliders, nor be prepared as often to take the advantage.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 07:47 UTC
Total: 199, showing: 1 – 20
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