ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1118, showing: 81 – 100
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Actually, these shots appear to be a full stride apart, with the Spencer image earlier. I think Pfaffenbach got the better photo, and might actually have gotten it as a deliberate reaction to the changing scene... although it is fairly likely that both are just the luckiest image in a burst. The only thing I don't like so much about the Pfaffenbach image is the white streak trailing from his head.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2016 at 19:43 UTC as 39th comment
In reply to:

ProfHankD: There has been a fair bit of playing with microlenses over the last few years. It is most important for small fill-factor sensors and largish feature-size fabs (like Canon has). With BSI and very high fill factors, I'm expecting microlenses to go away at some point. I've had more than a few conversations with imaging researchers over the last few years who were surprised that microlenses are still so common....

In theory, it's basically fill factor vs. light loss through the microlens. When fill factors are upwards of 95%, and especially with fast lenses where the microlens aperture actually reduces light, microlenses might hurt more than they help....

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2016 at 10:55 UTC

There has been a fair bit of playing with microlenses over the last few years. It is most important for small fill-factor sensors and largish feature-size fabs (like Canon has). With BSI and very high fill factors, I'm expecting microlenses to go away at some point. I've had more than a few conversations with imaging researchers over the last few years who were surprised that microlenses are still so common....

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2016 at 10:25 UTC as 4th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

pelikansalat: Did they license the protocol used for the communication between body and lens like Zeiss or did they reverse-engineer it like Metabones?

Thematic: Two comments ago you claimed E mount is open source and now you're saying you're happy Sony rejected a formal request that was fully compliant with their official policy. Consistency is not your forte, is it? BTW, the primary product Sony's refusal killed was an autofocus adapter for manual lenses -- which would have been very functionally similar to what came out years later from Techart as the Pro LM-EA7 (which they created independently). I wasn't willing to base a company on reverse-engineered interface specifications, whereas Techart was willing to take that rather huge risk.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2016 at 11:45 UTC
In reply to:

pelikansalat: Did they license the protocol used for the communication between body and lens like Zeiss or did they reverse-engineer it like Metabones?

If you think Sony has opened the E mount mechanical and protocol specs, please send me a copy or post a link to where you think it is posted by Sony.

E mount is NOT open source at all -- I know -- I formally applied for the E mount info and was rejected because "a university research group trying to spawn a company is not a company" despite having what Sony agreed was a good product with good reason to be given access to the basic E mount spec. Incidentally, my 3D-printable E mount adapter designs posted on Thingiverse are all original designs I engineered to be compatible by making measurements and trial and error fitting; Sony has never given me ANY info.

Sony is a major USER of open source, and has been running Linux in their cameras for years. They also have opened the JSON-based camera remote control API. However, they have not opened E mount mechanical design, lens protocols, nor in-camera app API (although that has now been hacked and Sony has warned people not to use it).

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2016 at 20:28 UTC
In reply to:

pelikansalat: Did they license the protocol used for the communication between body and lens like Zeiss or did they reverse-engineer it like Metabones?

Sony announced that they would make the BASIC E mount spec freely available... but they still have an approval process where they don't approve all requests and they also do NOT count the protocol as part of the basic E mount spec.

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2016 at 22:17 UTC

"The 86mm of maximum diameter is also the result of years of R&D for best handling, by adding stability."

Hmm. First off, it's more like 72mm for the lens to sit flat mounted on an A7. Second, the number 86 really took years? Ok, I know it took Deep Thought 7.5 million years to get to 42... so maybe we should just be happy 86 didn't take 15.357 million years? ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2016 at 22:10 UTC as 3rd comment

Around 1999, I bought some Olympus D340R to use with a 185-degree fisheye lens. I kept one running tethered via RS232C as a security camera for about a decade after that... although it slowly had the lens infinity stop move so you needed to enable macro mode to focus at infinity. Lasted well over 1M exposures before it totally died.

However, I think the clamshell is NOT a very good form factor. First, you don't want to see the kludgey mount adapter it took to put on that fisheye converter. Second, I can't count how many times the camera would wake up while in a pocket; the act of taking it out of a pocket would usually turn it on. Third, if you get any dirt ON the camera in use, it sort-of gets trapped IN the camera when the lid slides closed.

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2016 at 14:37 UTC as 120th comment
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I wonder how many actual DEATHS have been caused by people taking photos? You know, backing-up into traffic as you try to fit everything into the frame or falling off a cliff while striking a pose for a selfie.... it's at least hundreds -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_selfie-related_injuries_and_deaths . After all, tens of thousands have died because of texting or making calls on a cell phone; 16,000 between 2001-2007 according to http://www.reuters.com/article/us-cellphones-driving-idUSTRE68M53K20100923 .

erfIII: Trains seem to be the #1 thing involved in selfie fatalities. People accidentally shooting themselves in selfies is also shockingly common, as are accidental electrocutions. I would have expected falling and other more mundane things to be much more common than things involving trains... although those things are pretty common too... probably just more often survivable.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2016 at 23:01 UTC

I wonder how many actual DEATHS have been caused by people taking photos? You know, backing-up into traffic as you try to fit everything into the frame or falling off a cliff while striking a pose for a selfie.... it's at least hundreds -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_selfie-related_injuries_and_deaths . After all, tens of thousands have died because of texting or making calls on a cell phone; 16,000 between 2001-2007 according to http://www.reuters.com/article/us-cellphones-driving-idUSTRE68M53K20100923 .

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2016 at 03:39 UTC as 45th comment | 5 replies
On article Rebel in your pocket: Canon EOS M3 Review (464 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris Yates: An effort short and a minute late. Both Canon and Dpreview with their camera and review respectively. Tell us something we don't already know. :P

Ok; here's something you might not know. Magic Lantern ( http://www.magiclantern.fm/ ) supports the EOS M, which gives it a huge number of additional features. Notice, however, that I said "EOS M" -- not M3 nor any other M model, and of course Canon has not been smart enough to in any way support or even adopt the Magic Lantern extensions and build them into their cameras (which would be trivial for them to do, as Magic Lantern is open source).

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2016 at 23:50 UTC

Sounds a lot like the TDCI sensor stuff I've been working on ( http://aggregate.org/DIT/ei20140205.pdf ). Pitty this is just 128x128 pixels.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2016 at 23:28 UTC as 7th comment
On article Brooks Institute announces closure (132 comments in total)

Higher education is increasingly viewed as being job training, which is only part of what traditional 4-year university degrees are about. However, Brooks presents themselves as offering several 3-year programs that are very focused on preparing students "for a variety of career paths," and in that context things like debt-to-earning metrics should matter. Sad to see them go, but sadder to see less than 35% of graduates earning enough to be able to repay their student loans; beyond that, their graduation rate is only 56% in 150% of the 3 years (i.e., 4.5 years).

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2016 at 12:21 UTC as 16th comment
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: I thought MFT shooters don't care about large formats? MFT has everything anyone ever needed lol

I kid but I do think Sony FE has pretty much killed Speed Boosters.

Using a telephoto lens designed for 135 film format on a micro4/3 sensor has an obvious advantage in that the higher pixel density crop is a lot like multiplying the focal length. However, it makes wide angles no longer wide. To overcome a 2X crop requires a roughly 0.5x focal reducer -- which would be hard to make, especially given the longish micro4/3 flange distance. I don't think even an optically good 0.7x focal reducer is compelling... except maybe for video modes where many of the larger-sensor cameras only sample a fraction of the area of their sensors.

On the other hand, focal reducers on APS-C bodies pretty much restore the FF view angle except for clipping the far corners (which many FF lenses would make unpleasantly dark from vignetting anyway, at least when shooting wide open). For Sony E mount, I also find APS-C focal reducers useful on FF bodies, where most (not LTII) can be used to get a square-cropped image with the same view angle as 3:2 aspect APS-C.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2016 at 12:28 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: when studio lenses retire (202 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: "Do you have an older, out-of-date lens that you still hold on to? What keeps you coming back to it? Let us know in the comments!"

I have and use over 150 old lenses... which is shockingly not that high a number for folks in the "Adapted Lens" forum. It's usually down to 3 Cs: cost, character of rendering, and construction quality. Which is why you will not find too many fans of plastic-housed AF lenses like this Nikkor in that forum. ;-)

Kaso: I think the main reason you don't see this lens much off Nikons is that it costs too much for too little quality. It is generally over $200 on eBay, while it is optically outperformed by the much better built Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.4 around $50 and Pentax M42 Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4 around $60.

Most of the M42 50mm f/1.4 Taks are slightly radioactive. Many higher-end lenses from that time have Thorium in the glass (for the same reason Lead Crystal glass has Lead in it). It takes a little UV cleaning to remove the yellowing that happens over many years, but the radioactivity is generally not a big deal.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 23:19 UTC
In reply to:

youngjohn: Leica aren't putting it up for auction. The original cameras from the tree have been transferred to their new museum and the tree structure was sold to a UK dealer who has replaced the cameras and is now auctioning the whole thing.

That makes much more sense.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 22:18 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: when studio lenses retire (202 comments in total)

"Do you have an older, out-of-date lens that you still hold on to? What keeps you coming back to it? Let us know in the comments!"

I have and use over 150 old lenses... which is shockingly not that high a number for folks in the "Adapted Lens" forum. It's usually down to 3 Cs: cost, character of rendering, and construction quality. Which is why you will not find too many fans of plastic-housed AF lenses like this Nikkor in that forum. ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 12:33 UTC as 72nd comment | 7 replies

Although Eye-Fi never supported any such thing, there is a perfectly workable Eye-Fi Server written in Python, and freely available, that I've used under Linux and that supposedly also works on both Windows and Macs.

I don't get why Eye-Fi themselves can't figure out how to do it....

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 03:10 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

PanoMax: http://petapixel.com/2015/05/24/365-gigapixel-panorama-of-mont-blanc-becomes-the-worlds-largest-photo/

Now I tell you, soon 60 terabytes won't be enough when we create images like this 46 terabytes file

There is never enough storage. The camera I've been working toward in my research would generate ~1TB/s of raw image data... and that's just one camera.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 01:53 UTC
On article Brevite launches two new Incognito camera backpacks (24 comments in total)

You know, as cool as these things are, my favorite bag's cooler -- no, I mean my favorite bag IS A COOLER. It currently costs $8.97: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Ozark-Trail-12-Can-Insulated-Backpack-Cooler/23467710

I use that as my splashproof "day bag" for camera equipment. I place a small, strapped, camera bag inside it and use some padded oversize lens bags to keep additional equipment from knocking around. It easily holds a pair of APS-C and FF Sony bodies, a half dozen lenses, a compact waterpoof camera, and various other goodies. The PVC liner keeps everything dry, but you have to be a little careful in that the PVC can outgas when new, so I recommend letting it sit empty in a hot car for a while and then soap-and-water clean the inside before letting camera equipment sit in it for extended periods.

In general, the top-opening soft cooler bags are great modules for carrying camera gear -- easily packed in other bags, very versatile, dirt cheap, and amazingly inobtrusive.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 03:17 UTC as 11th comment
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