ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1251, showing: 81 – 100
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On article Leica Summilux-SL 50mm F1.4 sample gallery (368 comments in total)
In reply to:

mxx: Just so everybody knows: I've got nothing to say about this lens.

There, I've said it.

Meh.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2017 at 16:38 UTC

Very nice. A tad bizarre that on the right side of the article title it says:

"Buy on Amazon.com From $2,796.95"

What was that selling? ;-)
I don't think this was really about the camera they used.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2017 at 16:15 UTC as 49th comment

I had a pair of these with FC-E8 converters tethered to a laptop on a simple autonomous robotic platform to capture fisheye images that that were sent to a cluster supercomputer to stitch and present an interactive 360-degree pan/zoom display on a video wall. That was in our 1999 research exhibit at the IEEE/ACM Supercomputing conference. After that, one became the tethered camera in the ceiling of my machine room... and it's still there, but not running since our last major cluster build party. A shot from it is at http://aggregate.org/SENSORS/108AMARK/bignow.jpg . Last count was over 3,000,000 exposures and still ok.

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 22:26 UTC as 46th comment
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1570 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: An absolutely top-of-the-line camera that still gets little respect in the comments here and is getting reviewed a year after release....

BTW, the comments about lenses are simply incorrect -- if you actually go count how many AF lenses (new+old, but mostly old) are available in A mount it is literally MORE than are native for any other mount (e.g., based on actual counts from places like KEH and eBay). Basically, Minolta was the first with a "modern" AF SLR so everybody made lenses for it -- and they're inordinately cheap now because A mount is no longer as popular. Take a look at Dyxum for a well-maintained list of many of the A-mount lenses with reviews.

HFLM: the 5D IV problem might be triggered by the adapter (?), but the camera locking and SAYING the battery should be removed and reinserted is a demented response which is very clearly how it was designed to behave when it detected some sort of lens error. As for the A-mount lenses, old ones don't have a focus motor -- it's in the body, like Nikon also did -- so it's plenty fast, but noisy (i.e., not ok for video). As for 42MP, almost no lenses with designs older than 3 years were literally designed to handle that -- and certainly not most Canon nor Nikon lenses. That's fine. Being at or beyond a Nyquist sampling of lens resolution is largely a good thing.

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 15:53 UTC
In reply to:

noflashplease: It looks fascinating and I might even buy one if it was a Lomography or MINT product. However, this is coming from a part of Eastern Europe without any obvious production infrastructure for this type of project. I'm also a bit concerned about the bellows material and I question just how the film extraction mechanism will work?

The prototype looks a little too slick and the best sample images don't look like the results you'd expect from an amateur meniscus lens. A little too good, if you ask me. Color me suspicious.

The lens is wide open at f/8 -- it doesn't take much to render at that print size when stopped down a bit. As for the manufacture, I think I could do nearly the whole thing (except the lens blanks) with a $350 laser cutter. This is easily in the range of quick builds in the workshop of a competent "maker" -- in fact, the ease with which competitors could duplicate/improve on this is probably the weakest aspect of the product.

The only thing that bothers me is the environmental claim. The instant film is not all that environmentally friendly.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 15:58 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1570 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: An absolutely top-of-the-line camera that still gets little respect in the comments here and is getting reviewed a year after release....

BTW, the comments about lenses are simply incorrect -- if you actually go count how many AF lenses (new+old, but mostly old) are available in A mount it is literally MORE than are native for any other mount (e.g., based on actual counts from places like KEH and eBay). Basically, Minolta was the first with a "modern" AF SLR so everybody made lenses for it -- and they're inordinately cheap now because A mount is no longer as popular. Take a look at Dyxum for a well-maintained list of many of the A-mount lenses with reviews.

Incidentally, I now prefer Sony E-mount bodies (which, via adapters, can take and even AF more lenses than any other mount -- it can even AF many manual lenses using the LA-EA7). I have to add that I recently got a Canon 5D IV for my research and it is honestly driving me nuts -- it is a very "polished" design, but has all sorts of really serious dumb problems (e.g., locking-up and telling me to remove the battery just because it had a glitch taking to the chip on a manual lens adapter), and IQ is much better than older Canon chips but still not really in the same class as the Sony FF sensors.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 13:34 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1570 comments in total)

An absolutely top-of-the-line camera that still gets little respect in the comments here and is getting reviewed a year after release....

BTW, the comments about lenses are simply incorrect -- if you actually go count how many AF lenses (new+old, but mostly old) are available in A mount it is literally MORE than are native for any other mount (e.g., based on actual counts from places like KEH and eBay). Basically, Minolta was the first with a "modern" AF SLR so everybody made lenses for it -- and they're inordinately cheap now because A mount is no longer as popular. Take a look at Dyxum for a well-maintained list of many of the A-mount lenses with reviews.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 13:32 UTC as 250th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

Prairie Pal: Those aren't girders laying on the floor. What we're looking at are storage racking and black storage boxes that fell from the walls. The exaggerated depressing lighting in the photo gives the impression of catastrophe. Tragic loss of lives aside, there really wasn't as much to overcome as Sony needs us to believe.

Beyond the work of reconstructing clean rooms and replacing/repairing specialized equipment, there is real danger in this level of destruction because of the extreme toxicity of some of the materials used in VLSI fab. I'm aware of fabs where the plan in case of accidental internal release of some materials was literally immediate and permanent sealing the facility (with the contaminated workers inside). Although that type of worst-case scenario doesn't seem to have happened, the potential for it can make repairs a much slower and more deliberate process than you might think... surprisingly like clean-up of a potentially-damaged nuclear reactor.

Link | Posted on Jan 28, 2017 at 15:38 UTC
In reply to:

role_of_72: Beautiful camera!
But on the bottom... is it scratched already? Is it that vulnerable (despite the coatings) or just a displayed item was (ab)used?

Glossy multi-layer (slightly different color layers) paint is fairly susceptible to showing minor injuries. More importantly, the marks don't look cool. My old Minolta XK's black paint has some worn spots and nicks that reveal the brass underneath it, but those battle scars actually give it what antique dealers would call "a nice patina."

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 21:26 UTC
On article Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art sample gallery updated (94 comments in total)
In reply to:

zakaria: Great series of pictures. The lens is deserves every $.

Lots of good stuff there, but my test for 85mm is always how it does against the dirt-cheap Samyang with the top-notch bokeh. On the non-portrait stuff, I think the Samyang actually might do a little better... but much of the non-portrait stuff here is pretty bad. On the portraits, this looks at least comparable to the Samyang, but it seems to focus closer -- the Samyang has trouble making a tight portrait. The comparison in the post below certainly suggests this isn't as good overall as the Sony GM. We need to see a lot more to see where it really belongs in the fairly wide gap between those two. ;-)

PS: I can AF my Samyang using the LM-EA7, which also gives it closer focus.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 16:50 UTC
On article Fujifilm X100F pre-production sample gallery (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

J A C S: Very nice color. This reminds me of what one of the Fuji executives said recently - we are not a camera company, we are a photography company.

Fuji is very careful to keep a FujiFilm look to their shots, and these definitely have it. Pretty nice handling of the JPEGs in general (e.g., good balance of noise reduction and detail retention), although they let the blacks block-up too much for my taste (as other Fujis do to). Not sure why the last B&W shot is so coarse... trying to emulate pushed Tri-X?

Link | Posted on Jan 23, 2017 at 13:52 UTC
On article Leica M10 real-world sample gallery (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

JakeB: There's just a certain 'something' about those shots. An aura. A 'feeling.'

It would be ridiculous to suggest that any other manufacturer's camera/lens combinations costing a tenth of the price could create this 'look.'

It's almost like Leica sprinkled a little, well, let's call it 'pixie dust' into their cameras and lenses and that magic travels along the lens to the sensor and is captured along with the rays of light.

Or perhaps the sensor itself contains this pixie dust and thus imbues the image with the 'aura.'

No matter how it works, one can immediately spot this 'Leica look' that no other camera is capable of creating. It positively glows from each image.

Money well spent, I'd say.

Maybe "pixel dust" -- there's got to be some explanation for why shots as low as 1600 on a FF 24MP sensor have a gritty/grainy look. I have a sneaking suspicion that this sensor should always be shot at 100 and digitally pushed after the fact. Still, I suppose those who really want to own a Leica M are happy this wraps fairly modern guts in a Leica skin for just $6K....

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2017 at 14:05 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (239 comments in total)
In reply to:

capanikon: Gimp is quite good and under appreciated by some.

I think very few really appreciate the role GIMP has had in getting new image processing technology out there. Lots of PhD theses and other academic research projects became real stuff by plugging-into GIMP, and the fork of CinePaint had a pretty significant role in the movie industry.

The catch is that you can't just build a major software tool and say "done!" Bit rot is real, and so is the need to add support for new things. It's happily shockingly common that people will donate years of effort to making free software (I have myself), but very few are willing to make one free program their life's work (I'm not). In sum, these are people passionate about the community service they are providing, and they deserve to be supported.

While we're at it, also think about the many other key bits of software that come out of such passion; e.g., Dave Coffin's dcraw. These folks are heroes.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 01:20 UTC
On article Leica announces M10 with new sensor, slimmer design (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kivivuori: Hmph,

"(....) M10 measuring just as thin as a film-era M4"

Not even close (M4: 33,5mm)

And just that`s why M4 feels much different - and better - in hand than M6TTL-models or any digital-M so far.

You know, I'd never notice the 4mm improvement that they had to sacrifice all the I/O ports for... but I think I'd notice the lack of I/O ports.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 03:43 UTC
In reply to:

dstate1: How about a camera shaped like a USB charger?

Been done. Look up USB hidden camera. There are several 1080P spy cameras that are disguised as plug-in USB chargers, generally starting around $25... so I guess cameras that look like USB chargers are cheaper than USB chargers that look like cameras? ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 16:50 UTC

Ok. So somebody got carried away making 3D models and then came up with this as an excuse for why they did it?

You know what I really don't understand? The fake lens says Sonnar, but the body doesn't say Sony...?

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 03:37 UTC as 50th comment
On article Canon granted third most US patents in 2016 (145 comments in total)
In reply to:

OlyPent: Then why is their (Canon's) camera line so old and stodgy?

Well, patents are largely a defensive measure with rights traded in mass to avoid getting sued for other things... but in Canon's defense I will say that Canon is capable of outstanding engineering. One of my students recently disassembled an $80 PowerShot that had died and, frankly, it's got some very impressive modules inside. The problem is that once they build a module, it never changes. I understand -- gotta recover the engineering and tooling costs -- but electronics don't age well.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 06:30 UTC
On article Buying a second lens: what lens should I buy next? (295 comments in total)

Nice overview for novices.

Just a little technical note: The opposite of "telephoto" is "retrofocal"; it just refers to a physical length being shorter or longer than focal length. I don't know why we don't talk about "wide angle" vs. "narrow angle" -- I think those concepts are easier to understand as well as more accurate. There's a similar confusion about "zoom" meaning "narrow angle" and yet another ambiguity about a "zoom" lens being a "prime." I believe "prime" really just means primary, created as a single optical unit, as opposed to separate add-on lens elements (e.g., a wide-angle converter); it's unclear if a zoom or "floating element" lens design that moves groups relative to each other is really a prime or not... so I prefer "fixed focal length" vs "zoom." We'll happily ignore the extra technicality about whether "zoom" lenses are "parfocal" -- not changing focus distance as you zoom. ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2017 at 17:34 UTC as 74th comment
In reply to:

TomHudsonVisual: Looks like they had fun doing it but it is conceptually weak as art. It does not convey their one-liner message (the message is actually backward), as there are too many more likely interpretations, which do not reflect well in photographers, I might add. I am most inclined to view this as an adult leggos play session.

Sadly, I have to agree. Linking photographic equipment and the act of shooting to use of actual firearms is a cliche', not very innovative and not a concept I'd like to reinforce. The plain white backgrounds don't help get any message across either. Overall, I'm left feeling a little sad that some nice old equipment that could make art was sacrificed to make this....

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2017 at 02:12 UTC
In reply to:

panther fan: Many have stated it already. DXOMark themself said these results are not comparable, because RED likely uses temporal noise reduction on their RAW Files.
This means they unfortunately didn't trick physics.

Although I've never seen anything from RED as a technical publication saying what they do, over 100% QE definitely sounds like a smoking gun for use of temporal enhancements. Catch is, that's absolutely fair -- it's a real improvement in quality of the scene appearance model captured. Hopefully we'll see more things along these lines for still imaging.

Link | Posted on Jan 13, 2017 at 11:35 UTC
Total: 1251, showing: 81 – 100
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