ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1187, showing: 81 – 100
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So, you're basically saying the D750 beats the A7RII because it's cheaper... but the A7II is really the Sony comparable to the D750. In fact, according to the pricing above, like the A7II, the D750 is under $2K and shouldn't be in this category.

I think the A7RII or A99II is the clear "winner" here, but all of these are solid cameras and it really a matter of how you weight different aspects as to which is best.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2016 at 12:20 UTC as 52nd comment | 3 replies
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (387 comments in total)

I have to say that I don't like the pricing trends. It used to be that the next generation was more features and better for the same or slightly lower price, but now there are a bunch of body-only crop sensors in the $1200-$2000 range. This sounds a lot like boosting prices to make-up for a dwindling market -- potentially the start of a cycle that doesn't end well for anybody.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 04:20 UTC as 26th comment | 4 replies
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (765 comments in total)

Very cute... although the music is a little too cute. ;-)

My first camera was an Imperial Delta, http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Imperial_Delta

What's more scary is that I have a photo of me taking a photo with it: http://aggregate.org/DIT/firstcam.jpg

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2016 at 01:02 UTC as 287th comment
In reply to:

Mike99999: $2,000

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

TomasCZ72: Read what I wrote -- I said with an A7RII-like sensor, "even MUCH HIGHER pricing would seem perfectly reasonable." To justify a $2K price, I think a 24MP FF sensor should really be the minimum (the A7II is well under $2K, and most of what it lacks relative to this can be summarized as "better firmware").

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 13:32 UTC
In reply to:

Mike99999: $2,000

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

$2K for a micro4/3 body, however well done, is problematic. I think what we're seeing here is the bad place Olympus ends up in thanks to the long-ago decision to go with a 4/3 sensor size -- and making all their lenses target that sensor size. In other words, nearly all of this could be done with a FF sensor like the one in the Sony A7RII (or even larger) and then even much higher pricing would seem perfectly reasonable. This is like building a full-size truck and powering it with a state-of-the-art motorcycle engine.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 10:12 UTC

I figure Trump is somehow involved with this....

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 01:47 UTC as 42nd comment

Ok, it runs Linux (just like Sonys do). Will folks be able to run their own code inside?

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 11:52 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

microcolor: And what about rx100 iv or v hs hd video with 1000 fps?))

I got an RX100IV specifically for the high-speed video -- it is excellent. However, record time is very limited and they don't give ROI (region of interest) support for doing higher speeds with fewer pixels. Actually, Sony makes a lot of consumer cameras with sensors that would be capable of scary high framerates with small ROIs, but they don't provide that option....

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 00:25 UTC
In reply to:

Johnny621: This particular Nikon I, serial number 60924, was made in April 1948 and is notable as being the third camera produced by Nikon. What happened to #s 0 thru 60923?

Actually, it's pretty rare that the first unit of any product sold is serial #1. Sometimes, serial numbers encode manufacture date or other production info. I also have often heard that having a higher serial number on a new product helps build consumer confidence, so manufacturers sometimes start with a random "bigly" number.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 02:38 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Very nice summary of the issues. However, just to be clear, problems with Li batteries are very common. The typical precursor to serious problems is the build-up of gasses that causes swelling of the package. If you have a battery that has started to expand, it should be safely discarded -- it is already failing (just not yet spectacularly).

moawkwrd: in my experience, it is disturbingly common for soft Li batteries. For example, 2 of 2 iPhone 5 in my family burst due to swelling batteries (but didn't catch fire) and 1 of my 2 SQ8 mini-DV cameras failed scorching the guts. BTW, these types of failures have been much more rare in hard-cased Li batteries... no more than a few percent among the dozens of hard-cased Li batteries I've used (yes, I use fleets of cameras ;-) ).

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 20:54 UTC

Very nice summary of the issues. However, just to be clear, problems with Li batteries are very common. The typical precursor to serious problems is the build-up of gasses that causes swelling of the package. If you have a battery that has started to expand, it should be safely discarded -- it is already failing (just not yet spectacularly).

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 10:53 UTC as 33rd comment | 3 replies

The 3.6mm kind of reminds me of the old Spiratone 12mm fisheyes... not a full circle on their intended format, but not full frame either. Looks like it would be fine as a 250-degree circle for APS-C. If only the price had 1 fewer digits. *sigh*

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 01:27 UTC as 16th comment

Two comments: (1) my DC260 was my first digital camera that had IQ defects that looked more like a film camera than like framegrabs from a cheap video camera and (2) Digita was a near miss on supporting camera apps. A lot of the problem was that the initial set of things Digita supported (e.g., in the DC260) wasn't rich enough, but the fact so few models from so few manufacturers adopted it also hurt a lot.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2016 at 10:33 UTC as 58th comment

This is the NEX-shaped APS-C body with IBIS that so many people have been saying they wanted ever since the NEX-5 was introduced... that would have been enough for many people. The catch is, the price point isn't so much lower than Sony's FF A7II... so it's good that it out-specs the A7II in various ways.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2016 at 13:15 UTC as 53rd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

ProfHankD: My wife and daughter both had iPhones which didn't burn, but had their cases burst by expanding batteries. Serious problems with glued-in batteries are common; Samsung was just unfortunate enough to (very rarely) have a very dangerous failure mode for the one in the S7. In my opinion, the disadvantages of glued-in batteries, which include various environmental issues involving disposal, far outweigh the advantages. Samsung used to have removable batteries -- as they do in the S5 that I use -- and I hope removable, sealed, batteries are what everybody gets back to. BTW, it wouldn't be that hard for the battery to be smart enough to detect a pending problem and disable itself.

NetMage: Did you take the iPhone 5s to Apple?

Yes. They replaced them under warranty free of charge. I should say that the defect was obvious; the phones were basically bursting at the seams, with up to about a 1/8" gap on one of them where the expanding battery forced the shell open.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2016 at 19:58 UTC

And if you listen very carefully, you can hear a faint voice with a Swedish accent saying "aren't you glad we stopped doing that sort of thing?"

I just want to know if Leica followed through with the style to the packaging. This camera should definitely come in a box that is full of ping-pong balls as packing material. ;-)

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 23:26 UTC as 127th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ProfHankD: My wife and daughter both had iPhones which didn't burn, but had their cases burst by expanding batteries. Serious problems with glued-in batteries are common; Samsung was just unfortunate enough to (very rarely) have a very dangerous failure mode for the one in the S7. In my opinion, the disadvantages of glued-in batteries, which include various environmental issues involving disposal, far outweigh the advantages. Samsung used to have removable batteries -- as they do in the S5 that I use -- and I hope removable, sealed, batteries are what everybody gets back to. BTW, it wouldn't be that hard for the battery to be smart enough to detect a pending problem and disable itself.

Removable batteries do add build cost and a little complexity, but "ugly" is a matter of style and personal preference.

RedFox88: Serious problems are "common"? Nope. -- YUP! Although Apple seems to have kept it quiet, the fraction of iPhone 5 destroying themselves was apparently quite high for units built in a certain period... and 100% for the two my wife and daughter had (which were not even the same color, but were bought at the same time). That they didn't die in the first month of ownership and never burst into flames doesn't make it a "non-serious" problem, just easier to keep out of the news.... BTW, one out of two SQ8 mini-DV cameras I've bought in the past month also had its pouch battery overheat and fail; no flames, but internal components scorched (I wonder if that's why the SQ8 has a metal case?).

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 16:58 UTC

My wife and daughter both had iPhones which didn't burn, but had their cases burst by expanding batteries. Serious problems with glued-in batteries are common; Samsung was just unfortunate enough to (very rarely) have a very dangerous failure mode for the one in the S7. In my opinion, the disadvantages of glued-in batteries, which include various environmental issues involving disposal, far outweigh the advantages. Samsung used to have removable batteries -- as they do in the S5 that I use -- and I hope removable, sealed, batteries are what everybody gets back to. BTW, it wouldn't be that hard for the battery to be smart enough to detect a pending problem and disable itself.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 13:06 UTC as 58th comment | 13 replies
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, this is the IBIS+NEX-shaped-body that so many people always said they wanted... and it's a pretty clear statement that Sony isn't dropping APS-C.

The scary thing is the pricing trend: this is easily the most expensive "6" model ever from Minolta or Sony, I'm starting to expect the A9 to top $5K. Pricing seems to have new models going up more than old models are going down. Ok, I understand that Sony isn't exactly leading the race to higher prices (e.g., Fuji has APS-C bodies several hundred dollars higher), but I'm still uncomfortable about this trend for the future of cameras and photography.... Of course, an A6000 or A7 isn't all that expensive and is still capable of amazing still image quality, so maybe it's just the death of video cameras as a separate market? I.e., you buy one camera rather than a still camera + a video camera, but you pay about the same total?

Engineering is always about meeting specifications; pricing is largely about marketing. In other words, the pricing depends on how quickly you want to recover development cost, how market demand will respond to different pricing, and how this fits with other models in the line... as well as per-unit build cost. In production, I doubt that this model really costs that much more to make than an A68, but initially I'm sure it does because the have dev costs to cover an yields on new chips are often low. We'll just have to see how quickly prices drop....

It is possible that the higher price is because of the damage Sony's fab suffered... in which case, pricing might drop pretty significantly once the fab has caught up.

In sum, I'm not saying Sony's gouging; I'm saying the industry in general seems headed for assuming high unit costs and lower sales volumes....

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2016 at 21:08 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (554 comments in total)

Well, this is the IBIS+NEX-shaped-body that so many people always said they wanted... and it's a pretty clear statement that Sony isn't dropping APS-C.

The scary thing is the pricing trend: this is easily the most expensive "6" model ever from Minolta or Sony, I'm starting to expect the A9 to top $5K. Pricing seems to have new models going up more than old models are going down. Ok, I understand that Sony isn't exactly leading the race to higher prices (e.g., Fuji has APS-C bodies several hundred dollars higher), but I'm still uncomfortable about this trend for the future of cameras and photography.... Of course, an A6000 or A7 isn't all that expensive and is still capable of amazing still image quality, so maybe it's just the death of video cameras as a separate market? I.e., you buy one camera rather than a still camera + a video camera, but you pay about the same total?

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2016 at 12:17 UTC as 59th comment | 2 replies
Total: 1187, showing: 81 – 100
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