ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1449, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

ProfHankD: Yet another indication that Sigma is still having to reverse-engineer lens interface stuff. That has been a very long-term problem for Sigma....

jennajenna: Sigma is a family-owned business, but claims to be the largest independent lens manufacturer -- they don't seem to collaborate with any camera makers (they do make cameras of their own). However, many 3rd-party lensmakers have close relationships with camera makers. My understanding is that Tamron in particular has had a number of deals where they made lenses sold under camera-maker brands, so they got the info needed.

For example, while Sigma has a long history of Sony incompatibilities, neither Tamron nor Zeiss do -- but they are both 3rd parties who have been involved in producing Sony-branded lenses. Such collaborative deals are common, and that's often how the bigger 3rd parties get access to specifications.

In sum, it's common that smaller 3rd-party companies (and 3D-print makers like me) must reverse engineer, but it's quite odd that a lensmaker as important as Sigma still must....

PS: Sony's E specs are mechanical only, and available only to approved companies.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2017 at 03:16 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: I love those wavy light rays in the diagram. This is what happens if you are too close to a black hole.

Yeah, not even then. The waves also change color on the way. Apparently, the Crystal Clear Lens also has some odd stair-step pattern going to the hole in the middle... wait. Hole in the middle? Maybe they should let an engineer look at the illustration after the artist has made it and before they advertise it?

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2017 at 01:01 UTC

Yet another indication that Sigma is still having to reverse-engineer lens interface stuff. That has been a very long-term problem for Sigma....

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2017 at 00:50 UTC as 14th comment | 9 replies

Sounds like a modern re-make of the old 60mm macros from Mamiya/Sekor, Yashinon, and Tomioka -- except they were f/2.8 and went to 1:1. Note sure this lens made the right choice on that tradeoff. The old 60mm usually run about 1/3 the price of this new, so the price isn't too bad for this.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 12:29 UTC as 44th comment
In reply to:

OliverGlass: "(But Camera companies are not your friends)..."
With the exception of FUJI which has been generous with firmware updates that add more features and are never afterthoughts. They listen to their users too.

cosinaphile: Fuji didn't fix things within a 45-day window -- ignoring early reports (many of those centered on the black holes, which were even worse but were repaired by a firmware update in 12/2011), there were LOTS of white orb complaints by 10/2011, the ineffective firmware fix was 2/25/2012, and the sensor replacement program started in 4/2012. I can't imagine Fuji didn't know the problems before the first unit was shipped, but it was still at least six months to a real response to customer complaints. Even after that, they continued selling the original sensor version side-by-side with the better (not good) one, without distinction, until product end-of-life.

In sum, I see the X10 sensor as a commendably bold, but clearly failed, experiment... that Fuji kept selling anyway. The lesson I think they learned is that product functionality doesn't matter as much as the company appearing to be responsive to customers. Is that good? I'm not sure....

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 00:31 UTC
In reply to:

OliverGlass: "(But Camera companies are not your friends)..."
With the exception of FUJI which has been generous with firmware updates that add more features and are never afterthoughts. They listen to their users too.

cosinaphile: A respectable company would not have sold a known-defective product, not lied about the firmware fix, and done a full refund/replace, not offer major surgery on your new camera. I'm sorry, but there is just no getting around the fact that Fuji handled this exceptionally badly.

Ironically, the repair algorithm in DeOrbIt, which I made freely available, was feasible for them to have used for a firmware fix -- and usually produced better results than their revised sensor (when that became available). I don't know why Fuji didn't put the DeOrbIt algorithm in either a firmware update to fix all cameras or in their software so existing photos could also be repaired.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 20:05 UTC
In reply to:

OliverGlass: "(But Camera companies are not your friends)..."
With the exception of FUJI which has been generous with firmware updates that add more features and are never afterthoughts. They listen to their users too.

Short memory. Fuji shipped known bad cameras (X10 and X-S1 "black holes" and "white orbs" problems), released a completely ineffective firmware fix, and finally only offered a service fix to owners that complained -- while continuing to sell the defective version with no consumer-visible differentiation on the packaging between the defective and revised (much less defective) version. I suspect they would never have done anything if DPReview hadn't made such a stink (or perhaps if I hadn't released the free DeOrbIt software to computationally repair the defects -- they announced a service fix a week after DeOrbIt's release and started offering repair the following month). In any case, good if they have learned not to do that again....

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 03:04 UTC

Well, I think Canon's lack of 4K is largely due to an older computational infrastructure in their cameras. Basically, there is what engineering can do, what manufacturing says it will cost to produce in quantity, and how marketing thinks it can be profitably sold. Most companies fall into patterns -- winning formulas -- for how to trade-off these different forces, and that's a lot of the difference we see between brands.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 18:51 UTC as 99th comment
In reply to:

cgarrard: Man we need a lot more info on the net like this. The internet has become a fantasy land for so many.

I think phrase now is alt-reality... but that's probably fake news.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 15:56 UTC
In reply to:

joe6pack: Impressive! I'm actually quite surprised the fire works out so well with all the flames instead of just 1 big blur like light painting. Now I want to play with fire.

That surprised me too. Only a few hints of horizontal movement....

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 15:43 UTC
On article Photo of the week: The Purple Hour (121 comments in total)
In reply to:

entoman: A classic photo Erez. I love sub-arctic and arctic landscapes (provided that the HDR isn't overdone - a trap many fall into), but it's too cold for my liking - I'll stick to temperate and tropical climates!

If I can be permitted a minor criticism - I don't like the starburst effect on the moon, it seems quite unnatural. Starburst works well sometimes with the sun, but not the moon. It is of course a well known feature of the 16-35mm Canon optic, but not one that I admire.

I agree about the starburst... but then, I generally see starbursts as the annoyingly structured flare that they really are.... ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2017 at 17:14 UTC

Another solid entry from Laowa. Not as impressive as some of their others, but 15mm field of view, f/2, and it takes a filter is a very friendly combo and MFT users generally prefer friendly over awkward and a little higher IQ.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2017 at 13:58 UTC as 16th comment

I'm a big proponent, and developer, of free software. I put most of my software out as open source with fewer usage constraints than a copyleft. I also post my 3D printing designs for free. However, Unsplash is a hard thing to get used to.

First off, I don't see what their business model is -- and there should be one, because it is a .com, not a .org. Second, I don't quite get the verbiage about they will handle license issues, because I don't see where they'd get money to pay for any court battles. Third, I'm honestly uncomfortable giving blanket permission for use of my photos... which is strange, given how comfortable I am giving away so much of my work product that is more valuable, but I guess they're often "personal" enough that it would bother me to see them used in certain ways.

In sum, I have to think about this....

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2017 at 02:03 UTC as 45th comment

There are two generic problems with IOT (Internet Of Things) devices:

1. They know a lot about us (arguably LOTS more for drones with video, audio, and GPS) and are often in "trusted" environments, for example, with access to networks behind firewalls

2. They can (and most do) "phone home" (typically to the manufacturer) providing data and potentially unsecured access to things we didn't think they could touch

DJI is far from alone in having drones logging and phoning home with data (most IOTs do), but they do NOT make any of their software infrastructure available for users to examine... so nobody really knows exactly what they do. This is where open source software is much less scary -- you can actually know what the device is capable of doing. Especially for sales to US military, I think it would be completely reasonable to require that all software be either audited by a 3rd party or provided as source, and it should also be possible to completely disable "phoning home."

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2017 at 00:17 UTC as 26th comment | 2 replies
On article Nine new lens adapters announced for the Fujifilm GFX (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: Given that 24x36mm film has a 43.3mm imaging circle, you could get considerable extra real estate with different aspect ratios and still staying inside the native imaging circle.

2:1 crop would be 19.3x38.7mm sensor area (vs 18x36mm crop)
16:9 crop = 21.2x37.7mm sensor area (vs 20.2 x 36mm FF crop)
4:5 crop = 27x33.8mm (vs 24x30mm FF crop)
3:4 crop = 26x34.5mm (vs 24x31.9mm crop)
1:1 crop = 30.6x30.6 (vs 24x24 FF crop)
(numbers rounded)

And given that you'd likely be able to oversize crop at least a little on most lenses, you'll probably go a bit farther. If you planned to shoot everything at 2:3, then you'd be gaining little if anything on the larger sensor. but anything else, you'll have a lot more data to work with.

If you like to shoot 1:1, then a ff lens at 30.5x30.5 is only a 1.08x crop factor from the native GFX cropped to 1:1. And I'm betting the vast majority of lenses could tolerate 8% overcrop farily well, leaving that at full GFX sensor height.

Yes, this was always the suspected reason for Sony's odd-sized sensor: it should be a great multi-aspect back for 135-format SLR lenses. It'll be interesting to see if any current production 3rd party lens makers decide to repackage their lenses directly to this mount....

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 23:36 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: This is an application of "structure from motion" (google for it). The execution is rather well done, most applications lack the quality in results a photographer would need. Kudos to the researchers.

Yeah, pretty much. It's basically creating a 3D (well, maybe 2.5D) model from a sequence of "zoom by walking" shots and then re-rendering the 3D model using potentially different perspectives for different depth regions. Like you, I'm pleasantly surprised by the apparent resulting image quality. However, the really new part is that different perspectives for different depths idea, and I'm not so sure that's a good thing....

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 13:42 UTC
In reply to:

Zdman: Not an apple fan and refuse to use their products for myself but what he says is not without merit. If you've ever tried using the Android API you'll quickly discover what a mess it is. There is unexplained behavior all over the place and hardware compatibility is a nightmare. Almost every 3rd party app has people complaining it won't work on their device. Want to access a new feature, forget about it, you'll have to wait till the next API update and then you'll only be able to use it on devices that run the next version of Android (and very few devices update, usually only flagships). I really wish Microsoft had been more sucessful in the phone space as they know how to maintain an operating system.

Zdman: I wonder who really has been buying all those DSLRs. My wife has never gone with a camera that didn't fit in her purse, nor did my mom. The women (and men) I've seen with DSLRs are usually folks who consider themselves to be "amateur photography buffs" although they might not have a clue what an f/stop actually is. There's also the bit of fun that recording school concerts is no longer allowed in many places because there may be children on stage with your kid who are, for example, kids removed from a abusive parent (I used to be a foster parent so I know it is illegal to post photos of a foster kid; it's considered a threat to their safety). Anyway, I'm just happy that now you see people using phones rather than ipads. ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 11:04 UTC

Nice images, but the stitching can be a nightmare when component images are temporally skewed -- for example, ripples on the surface of water don't line up. I have a rig that can shoot 288MP simultaneously, and there are various camera array systems that can capture 1GP or more simultaneously; they're a pain too, but at least they don't give motion artifacts....

PS: Real supercomputing folks don't brag about overclocking; in fact, we are more likely to underclock to increase reliability of the massively-parallel system.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2017 at 14:31 UTC as 9th comment
In reply to:

Zdman: Not an apple fan and refuse to use their products for myself but what he says is not without merit. If you've ever tried using the Android API you'll quickly discover what a mess it is. There is unexplained behavior all over the place and hardware compatibility is a nightmare. Almost every 3rd party app has people complaining it won't work on their device. Want to access a new feature, forget about it, you'll have to wait till the next API update and then you'll only be able to use it on devices that run the next version of Android (and very few devices update, usually only flagships). I really wish Microsoft had been more sucessful in the phone space as they know how to maintain an operating system.

Apple has always had the advantage of controlling everything... which is why I always thought their 1984 commercial was a little odd. Anyway, Android does suffer from having relatively open standardization, and I'm sure the result is that rolling-out a new technology to the entire Android infrastructure can be a little slower. The same can be said about Linux, from which Android is derived... although the openness does mean more people can and do contribute new technology, and most software developers prefer Linux to proprietary OS platforms (I sure do).

The thing that is dumb here is talking about iPhone ending DSLRs -- which is sort of like saying the iPod killed reel-to-reel tape audio recording, which it didn't. The thing that is replacing DSLRs is mirrorless; smartphones are really in an entirely different usage space and computational photography doesn't change any of the physics that favor larger-than-fit-in-a-phone sensors for various photographic applications.

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2017 at 11:13 UTC
On article Fujifilm GF 110mm F2 sample gallery (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Pretty awesome stuff. It's probably better than my A7RII + Samyang 85mm f/1.4, but I think my A7RII + Sony 100mm STF still beats it. Just imagine next generation when GFX gets the same sensor tech used in the A7RII....

For me, that's sort of like imaging Ansel Adams taking his film to a 24-hour development kiosk in a local shopping center. An artist should know their medium. Then again, I used to do freelance commercial photography and now I do computational photography research, so I'm biased and YMMV....

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2017 at 17:35 UTC
Total: 1449, showing: 61 – 80
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