ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering and creatively using camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1708, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Playright: 30 Shots per charge! I think you meant 300!

Yeah; they say 300 in the specs.

BTW, I still think that's a problem. When a camera is wet, changing the battery can get moisture on the compartment seal, which will cause a leak.

The OVF really isn't such a big deal for a rugged camera. I have an Olympus Stylus Tough TG-860 and the tilting rear LCD (which can even tilt all the way up for selfies) is much more useful. Having the LCD tilted, for example to waist-level viewing, really helps hold the camera in places I can't get my face.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2018 at 10:10 UTC
In reply to:

Retzius: I think the genius that decided to polish the inside of the lens hood should get a promotion

Even the Waterhouse stops are gold. Designed for Donald Trump? A Russian lens that gives golden showers of flare. Ew.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 00:40 UTC

Much as I'm not crazy about Fujis, I have to give them credit for adding some nice features in firmware updates. Sony in particular is really missing this boat. Things like extreme focus bracketing could easily have been implemented via camera apps in Sonys... but the latest Sonys don't support camera apps and don't have these features built in.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2018 at 00:41 UTC as 28th comment | 2 replies
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

AZBlue: For all the posting Sony fanboys have done in the Nikon forum, this is truly hilarious. Payback is a beyotch! So SO glad I have a Nikon D850. It actually works and takes excellent images that I don't need to fix in post.

Oh, and did you see the "fix" for this striping issue isn't even from Sony - it's from some third party, which is basically a patch job. And the resulting image comes out slightly softer than the original. So much for your Sony's resolution... I'm laughing so hard right now...

Rishi: DFD requires a lot of computational sophistication to work with a single frame sample -- which I don't think the current versions have. However, it's a good bet that will happen eventually -- which is why I say long term. I'm also mystified by Canon's DPAF clipping and AA filtering, but not too smiley-faced about it. :-(

As for the "output version" of light fields, you can definitely go see it working. The company is http://misappliedsciences.com/ and CTO Paul Dietz is my brother. It's very newly public that they are doing this; Geekwire did a little piece on it: https://www.geekwire.com/2018/breakthrough-parallel-reality-display-technology-promises-personalize-world-without-goggles/

Link | Posted on May 4, 2018 at 22:52 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

AZBlue: For all the posting Sony fanboys have done in the Nikon forum, this is truly hilarious. Payback is a beyotch! So SO glad I have a Nikon D850. It actually works and takes excellent images that I don't need to fix in post.

Oh, and did you see the "fix" for this striping issue isn't even from Sony - it's from some third party, which is basically a patch job. And the resulting image comes out slightly softer than the original. So much for your Sony's resolution... I'm laughing so hard right now...

Rishi: Canon's DPAF has very serious crosstalk problems, and I have to wonder how much of that is due to an AA filter rather than VLSI fab issues. That said, DPAF is just a very crude version of a plenoptic sensor -- distinguishing just two (not very sharply defined) ray angles per pixel. I'm still not sure if I believe plenoptics are the future. For AF, I think depth from defocus using PSF recognition might be the longer-term winner, and even if you believe in what Lytro was pushing, there are other ways to get essentially the same data plenoptics get you (e.g., coded apertures).

Incidentally, I do believe in the "output version" of plenoptics: lightfield display technology. However, I'm biased. My brother is CTO of Misapplied Sciences, a Seattle-based company making "Parallel Reality" displays that can show thousands of people different things at the same time. :-)

Link | Posted on May 4, 2018 at 02:34 UTC

Super-Wide is less wide than Ultra-Wide?

Well, I guess that's good news for Ultraman and bad news for Superman. ;-)

Also strange they quote field of view for wides and X factors for tele and macro....

Link | Posted on May 2, 2018 at 17:59 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies

So, we have an NIR/ViS/NIR+VIS camera with 10um pixels doing 720P (1280x720 video) and a fast (normal) lens. Interesting. I wonder if they did something cute like R,G,B,NIR for the CFA? (Probably not.) The sensor does have 2-frame HDR support at 30FPS!

They also have their sensor available as a dev kit, so the specs are here: https://www.sionyx.com/uploads/1/1/8/7/118701572/sionyx_xqe-1310_data_sheet_v08.pdf

I have to admit that the sensor sounds pretty appealing....

Link | Posted on May 1, 2018 at 16:49 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

Full Stop: Could someone make a picture where the object has a real thin vertical scratch?
Just to check if we are running into a new "scratch-eater" problem with this fix.
:-)

BlueBomberTurbo: "As stated by the creator," -- just to be clear, that's me. :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 18:32 UTC

Ok. This seems a better product idea than the "Digital Rolleiflex" from 2011 that was too expensive and had a tiny 3MP sensor. I would be happier if they didn't call it a "Kamera." ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 01:52 UTC as 15th comment
On article Why smartphone cameras are blowing our minds (448 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: Sorry, why do think this technology is somehow limited to just smartphones. Computational photography has been developing for 20 years at least, but now we have the on-board processing power to start to fully realise it’s potential. For example depth from defocus is a computational process and when I was at Canon they were trying to implement it to create much better background blur from cheap and slow lenses (with not a much success).

Sure smartphones have much more powerful processing power than cameras at the moment, but that will change, a camera is a much larger device and is more capable of better heat dissipation and has battery life improves, expect cameras to leverage this greater computational power along with improved connectivity for AI.

Will that change?

The problem isn't so much lack of compute power in cameras as it is a too narrow mindset for camera manufacturers. In my research, I've been able to program even wimpy little Canon PowerShots under CHDK to implement many computational photography algorithms that are more advanced than what one finds on cell phones. The problem is that CHDK, Magic Lantern, and Open Memories -- the three best camera app environments in commodity cameras -- are all unsupported by the manufacturers of the cameras they run in.

Sony is particularly frustrating because their cameras have a beefy Linux environment inside that includes a fully implemented secure camera app infrastructure (PlayMemories), yet they have kept it closed to 3rd-party/open-source developers and literally stopped supporting it on new models after the OpenMemories hack provided a way for developers to use it. Stunningly dumb move in my opinion....

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 01:41 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

AZBlue: For all the posting Sony fanboys have done in the Nikon forum, this is truly hilarious. Payback is a beyotch! So SO glad I have a Nikon D850. It actually works and takes excellent images that I don't need to fix in post.

Oh, and did you see the "fix" for this striping issue isn't even from Sony - it's from some third party, which is basically a patch job. And the resulting image comes out slightly softer than the original. So much for your Sony's resolution... I'm laughing so hard right now...

AZBlue: once redesigned, the D750 flare problem became typical of DSLRs, rather than far worse than typical. Odd definition of "problem solved" you have there. ;-) Even odder in that the problem I referenced wasn't with the shutter as you suggested, but flare off the PDAF sensor -- there is a separate serious defect with the D750 shutter involving shading a portion of the image. BTW, the D750 shutter sticking problem is yet another issue. Ugh.

Thin profit margins and short development cycles discourage improving shipped products and pretty much nobody in the camera biz does much this way unless forced to. For example, it took about a year for Fuji to deal with the X10 "white orbs" issue, and their "fix" wasn't really a fix, but reduced a record-setting problem to merely very bad. The problems with Sonys have been relatively minor, but Sony certainly doesn't have a leading record in improving products after you own them....

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2018 at 02:07 UTC
In reply to:

Clint Dunn: I remember seeing an Ansel Adams exhibition at MOMA years ago. What blew me away wasn't his compositions so much as his prowess in the dark room. He absolutely didn't produce the majority of his prints 'straight from the camera', it was major work in the darkroom masking/dodging/burning. If Ansel were alive today he absolutely would be a Photoshop geek.

YES! It's not the medium (equipment, etc.) that one uses, it's the level of mastery of it.

I think Ansel would be a gear geek in general, using whatever camera, lenses, software, etc. in very sophisticated ways to achieve his vision. In fact, I'd bet he'd have a few bits of hardware/software that he'd have custom made himself to do things the standard stuff doesn't quite... just like Da Vinci wasn't just a master of the conventional media, but also was continuously inventing new technology to improve the medium (some of which didn't work as well as hoped, such as the dry wall method used for The Last Supper -- but it allowed him to obtain a unique look).

It's a poor workman who blames his tools -- a great craftsman/artist is known by mastery of their tools and their ability to construct special tools whenever needed.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2018 at 13:19 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I don't see any electrical contacts for using actual E-mount lenses -- they need 'em. I also don't see how one would manually focus or even compose a shot. In short, I don't see the point of this... is there one?

Yes, manual (native or adapted) lenses work fine on a non-electronic E mount. However, that still doesn't give a focus method nor viewfinder for farming.

It seems much more compelling to me to take an existing 135 film camera and hack the mount on it. In fact, most SLR lenses can be adapted to Canon FL/FD/FDn with 3D-printed adapters I've made, and nice old Canon film bodies are cheap and easy to find. For E mount, you'd probably have to start with a rangefinder body and replace the mount, but that seems easier than this and would provide an optical viewfinder (and maybe rangefinder focus coupling, if you're clever enough)....

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 15:53 UTC

I don't see any electrical contacts for using actual E-mount lenses -- they need 'em. I also don't see how one would manually focus or even compose a shot. In short, I don't see the point of this... is there one?

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 01:44 UTC as 22nd comment | 3 replies
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

AZBlue: For all the posting Sony fanboys have done in the Nikon forum, this is truly hilarious. Payback is a beyotch! So SO glad I have a Nikon D850. It actually works and takes excellent images that I don't need to fix in post.

Oh, and did you see the "fix" for this striping issue isn't even from Sony - it's from some third party, which is basically a patch job. And the resulting image comes out slightly softer than the original. So much for your Sony's resolution... I'm laughing so hard right now...

AZBlue: It is possible that the raw conversion to JPEG makes it "softer" because the image data has lower contrast without the bright stripes (sharpening is often context sensitive), but the repaired raw isn't softer. The vast majority of pixels are literally unchanged by KARWY-SR.

Like KARWY-SR, Nikon's Image Dust Off produces a partly cooked raw to repair an optical artifact (a different one -- dust rather than flare). Unlike KARWY-SR, the affected pixels are generally in blobs and the way it replaces the affected pixels is interpolation that causes smoothing over those blob areas.

BTW, Nikons (and nearly all DSLRs, but especially the D750) actually suffer a nastier type of flare artifact due to reflections off the separate PDAF sensor: https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2014/12/24/nikon-d750-flare-problems-heres-why-and-what-to-do-about-them-its-not-lens . The bad news is, those artifact can't easily be repaired like the on-sensor PDAF flare in the Sony can.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 16:09 UTC

Very nicely done, although it seems like more work than it should have been. I think using a Pi made this harder than some other choices might have made it. Have you considered using the video out for something cute?

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 14:08 UTC as 9th comment
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

scokill: It's not really a fix is it? So you post process it out?

I'm careful to call what KARWY-SR does "credible repair" of the objectionable flare artifacts. It technically isn't a "fix" because the flare really was there (nothing is literally broken) and we can't know what the scene would look like without that flare (the repair is based on assumptions about scene properties).

KARWY-SR inputs and outputs a raw ARW2 data file. It's not conventional post processing, but it is cooking the raw a little... at a level comparable to things many (most?) cameras do when they create raw files in the first place. In fact, what KARWY-SR does changes the raw data far less than using Adobe DNG Converter to convert an ARW2 file into a DNG.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 00:57 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

Full Stop: Could someone make a picture where the object has a real thin vertical scratch?
Just to check if we are running into a new "scratch-eater" problem with this fix.
:-)

That's basically what the model's blonde hair is. ;-)

So, yes, KARWY-SR will "eat" things that look enough like the expected stripes. This is also part of why I think this type of repair in-camera should always be optional.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2018 at 13:23 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

AZBlue: For all the posting Sony fanboys have done in the Nikon forum, this is truly hilarious. Payback is a beyotch! So SO glad I have a Nikon D850. It actually works and takes excellent images that I don't need to fix in post.

Oh, and did you see the "fix" for this striping issue isn't even from Sony - it's from some third party, which is basically a patch job. And the resulting image comes out slightly softer than the original. So much for your Sony's resolution... I'm laughing so hard right now...

AZBlue: unlike the the repair done by, for example, Nikon's "Image Dust Off," the repair done by KARWY-SR doesn't make the image "softer" by any reasonable definition of that word. The issue is simply how accurately KARWY-SR can identify which pixels are artifacted. Currently, it will occasionally repair pixels that were not really artifacted while missing some that were... but it got a lot better at that going from alpha test to the current beta, and probably will get much better.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2018 at 13:19 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (791 comments in total)
In reply to:

NOWHITELENS: So, is this Sony still the next D750?
Come on, you have to admit this is funny!

The D750 problem BlueBomberTurbo refers to is actually COMMON TO NEARLY ALL DSLRs, but just happened to be more dramatic than usual on the D750 due to a slightly higher placement of the PDAF sensor. In truth, mirror boxes in general tend to cause more reflections and artifacting than is common for mirrorless because there is more stuff in there to reflect light and a larger space for it to bounce around in. (Mirrorless lens adapters often cause similar problems, but there's less in them to reflect off.)

As to the computational repairability, the more subtle the artifact, the harder it is to reliably recognize and credibly repair. Not only does the D750 artifacting have very soft edges that are hard to recognize, but there also are secondary reflections that make the general shape of the defect highly variable. Credible repair would be beyond the ability of a simple method like that used in KARWY-SR; I'd probably approach it using either genetic programming or a deep neural net.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2018 at 13:08 UTC
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