ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1161, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

ProfHankD: "... that has appeared on the company's forums" -- since when is Magic Lantern a company? It is an independent project developing software to enhance the operation of various Canon EOS cameras, rather like CHDK. Producing DNGs in camera is insignificant (and doesn't make much sense) compared to all the major enhancements in ML.

ML, which is truly an open project, gets called a company... while Adobe-controlled DNG is imagined to be an open standard. Sigh.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 03:16 UTC

"... that has appeared on the company's forums" -- since when is Magic Lantern a company? It is an independent project developing software to enhance the operation of various Canon EOS cameras, rather like CHDK. Producing DNGs in camera is insignificant (and doesn't make much sense) compared to all the major enhancements in ML.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 00:32 UTC as 15th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

dtibi: CHDK offered the same several years ago on powershot cameras...
Of course it was unconfortable to use, was way too slow, took about 3 seconds to save a DNG/RAW before dispalying the image on screen.

CHDK DNGs are a huge step up from the "normal" CHDK raw format because normal CHDK raws are JUST the sensor data -- there was no Canon native raw on those cameras and the normal CHDK raws don't have enough info to decode the image without separately entering some additional data that would normally have been in EXIF. BTW, even on the sub-$100 PowerShots, CHDK DNGs give about 1 stop more DR than you can get with JPEG -- and fewer artifacts.

On the other hand, ML is running on cameras that already support Canon native raws, so what's the advantage to DNG? Beyond that, generating a DNG that gets past Adobe's validation is a piece of cake using code freely available... like the code in CHDK or Dave Coffin's Elphel DNG.

The ML folks do a lot of things much more newsworthy than this....

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 00:24 UTC
On article GearEye is an RFID-based gear management system (45 comments in total)

Fool me once....

https://www.dpreview.com/news/8012110697/f-stop-abandons-kitsentry-kickstarter-doesn-t-offer-backers-refunds

Really not a bad idea, but one that doesn't have a good history so far.

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2016 at 13:02 UTC as 17th comment

Yeah, never hire the guy who uses a Hastlebad -- they're a real pain to deal with. ;-)

For what it's worth, I do think asking something like "What equipment would you use for our wedding?" is a decent question, but the high-scoring answers would be just about anything for which the follow-up question "Why?" gets a coherent answer.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2016 at 13:43 UTC as 147th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

MikeManr: Apple makes camera! Im shocked!

You said this before... two comments down. ;-)

Anyway, don't be too shocked: Apple didn't really "make" those products... and it isn't clear they even played a big role in design of those. Apple's innovation is primarily in marketing, and they are awesomely good at that. The best Apple product you can buy has always been their stock. ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2016 at 13:25 UTC

The problem with the QuickTake was that it in no way outperformed the Snappy video digitizer paired with a cheap camcorder. The Casio QV-100 was my first non-tethered digital (from 1996, I think), and it did a variety of things neither a QuickTake nor a camcorder+Snappy could. For example, I even uploaded slides for a conference talk to it and used it to give a formal presentation... although I have to say the Casio .CAM files were a huge pain to deal with!

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2016 at 14:49 UTC as 19th comment
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2016 (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Kind of strange placement of the A6500 and A6300 (and lack of placement of the A99 II). I think people are a little confused because in 2015 many people said that Sony's future was all about FF E-mount... and 2016 was everything but that! Sony really is taking all these paths simultaneously.

Scintilla Aquila: true enough! People complained about lack of lenses... and this was the year of E-mount lenses. Yup, they're FE (FF capable), but they'll also work great on APS-C... killing two birds with one stone. ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2016 at 17:47 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2016 (271 comments in total)

Kind of strange placement of the A6500 and A6300 (and lack of placement of the A99 II). I think people are a little confused because in 2015 many people said that Sony's future was all about FF E-mount... and 2016 was everything but that! Sony really is taking all these paths simultaneously.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2016 at 15:58 UTC as 80th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Ran Plett: So aerial photos are:
__ worthwhile and offer a unique perspective
__ a fad like overbaked HDR that will die once the market is saturated.
__ either of the above, depending on what you can do with it.

Always shooting video (or stills) from way up high is not better (nor even quite as good) as always shooting at standing eye level. Great for landscapes, sort-of, but violating all the rules about having something in the foreground. Perhaps drones will get better at close-up things, but the prop noise, prop wash, high energy consumption rate, etc., make the current types awkward for that even if the control system could handle it.

In sum, photographically, these drones are primarily a way to get a camera into higher positions that wouldn't otherwise be accessible. It's not a lot different from a century of putting cameras up in kites -- especially for stills. It is a great tool to have available, but these types of drones are a rather specialized tool.

PS: I've had my drone for several years now and still can't fly it anywhere near as well as I'd like to.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2016 at 13:39 UTC
In reply to:

dwill23: trust me, there's no shortage of people filming things...doesn't need to be professional.

Firefighters and police are trained to rush into harm's way for the sake of others, and it's not so different for journalists and photojournalists. It takes a certain level of training and experience to be able to handle these situations well and safely. Unprofessional -- in the sense of being insufficiently trained, sloppy, or inept -- conduct of photographers in such circumstances are most likely to result in more people being injured or killed.

It's not a matter of being a paid photographer, it's about being a photojournalist. I was the first photo editor for Columbia Spectator's Broadway magazine, so I appreciate that photojournalism is more than being in the right place at the right time. One can learn a lot without making journalism your profession (I'm a computer engineering professor), but as the full-time jobs in journalism dwindle, I worry that fewer people will develop the skills needed and be motivated to report in a safe, unbiased, and accurate way....

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 01:54 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

iamatrix: Definitely looks like the sharpest lens I have seen yet on the Sony system. Doesn't really have that 3D look, but the per pixel detail looks impressive.

rfsill: some fringing can help, but chromostereopsis is literally composition with red things in front, blue behind. Has to do with human physiology, blue being most often seen in the sky, etc. The wikipedia page isn't bad.

BTW, I personally thought the answer was that "3D pop" was a combination of high contrast in-focus gently leading to slightly out of focus regions... which I could automate in postprocessing... but unfortunately informal polling here quickly revealed the lack of general agreement. KInd of killed that whole research line for me. Oh well.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 22:44 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

iamatrix: Definitely looks like the sharpest lens I have seen yet on the Sony system. Doesn't really have that 3D look, but the per pixel detail looks impressive.

I did a little survey here, and the only "3D look" people agreed on was chromostereopsis (red things in front), which has nothing to do with the lens used. Beyond that, stereo image pairs are technically only 2.5D. Done raining on folks parades for now.... ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 17:40 UTC
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1128 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: The IBIS is described as 'not class leading'. I find this a strange comment since the A6500 is the ONLY mirrorless aps-c camera to have IBIS.

Is the A6500's class deemed to include DSLRs like the Pentax K3II? Or are you judging it against the IBIS of m43?

If the latter then I think you open yourself up to obvious criticism as it is self evidently more difficult to stabilise an aps-c sensor - which is larger - than an m43 one.

I use IBIS on my A7II all the time on lenses from 8mm to 500mm -- it works fine. And how many 500mm IS mirror lenses do you know of (especially with range-limited AF thanks to a TechArt Pro)?

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 13:21 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I think the big problem with this is that good encryption isn't computationally cheap enough for the relatively slow ARM32 processors used in most cameras. Using CHDK, ML, or OpenMemories, one could probably put code into a camera to do this, but it would almost certainly be as a slow in-camera postprocessing step. It would be pretty hard to convince companies to add encryption hardware....

Actually, a lot of Flash memory cards also have ARM32 cores that could be programmed to do it... but then the camera probably wouldn't be able to review the files once written.

"Apps and hardware can be hacked, which means any encryption is basically a deterrence, at best."

I'm actually talking about hacking in to implement encryption. ;-)

Anyway, hackability shouldn't compromise a good encryption scheme -- it's generally assumed that attackers would know the encryption algorithm. The catch is that the 1st commenter, Timbukto, was very right in pointing out https://xkcd.com/538/ -- the attacker can just torture the photographer until the decryption key is revealed.

What you'd really want is a public key system where the camera could encrypt images so that ONCE ENCODED they could ONLY BE DECODED BY A PARTICULAR SEPARATE COMPUTER, and NOT by the camera that made them. Thus, the photographer and camera literally wouldn't know the key to decrypt by. The taking camera could even broadcast the encrypted data to whatever compatible wifi devices will accept it -- thus allowing secure recovery of the data even if the original copy is destroyed.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 04:08 UTC
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1128 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: The IBIS is described as 'not class leading'. I find this a strange comment since the A6500 is the ONLY mirrorless aps-c camera to have IBIS.

Is the A6500's class deemed to include DSLRs like the Pentax K3II? Or are you judging it against the IBIS of m43?

If the latter then I think you open yourself up to obvious criticism as it is self evidently more difficult to stabilise an aps-c sensor - which is larger - than an m43 one.

Yeah, the truth is just saying the 6500 is a 6300 + IBIS should have gotten it a gold... and it's actually got a number of other "minor" improvements. It's also a bit strange to say it's less of a value when it's still cheaper than most of it's APS-C competitors -- that don't have IBIS, nor competitive IQ, etc. Meh. It's pretty obvious that this reviewer doesn't appreciate IBIS....

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 03:40 UTC

I think the big problem with this is that good encryption isn't computationally cheap enough for the relatively slow ARM32 processors used in most cameras. Using CHDK, ML, or OpenMemories, one could probably put code into a camera to do this, but it would almost certainly be as a slow in-camera postprocessing step. It would be pretty hard to convince companies to add encryption hardware....

Actually, a lot of Flash memory cards also have ARM32 cores that could be programmed to do it... but then the camera probably wouldn't be able to review the files once written.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 02:47 UTC as 44th comment | 4 replies

Nice stylishly-colored case to protect the camera body (and probably also to hide the fact that they got a good deal on some Samsung Galaxy NX parts), but apparently no lenscap or lens cover of any kind. I think that pretty much defines their priorities....

Beyond that, wouldn't it be better to have the AI run in-camera with nearly immediate feedback? Don't I already own cameras that can do that? Yes, I do: all the auto scene modes in various cameras, Sony's auto crop, etc. I never turn that stuff on, but it is there without a monthly fee or 1-day processing lag. :-)

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 00:48 UTC as 220th comment
In reply to:

Peter Del: The first three are wonderful.
I hope all the plastic is recycled!

Very creative and very effective! The only thing that breaks the illusion is the floor pattern... although I suppose using actual sand would have been highly impractical.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 12:55 UTC

Click-less aperture and priced like a video lens too. Pitty. I would have thought Meyer-Optik would have at least remembered the preset aperture trick, which gives a clicked aperture stop with a click-less control to open/close to the preset stop.... Still, at $3K, I'm not their market.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2016 at 21:50 UTC as 41st comment
Total: 1161, showing: 21 – 40
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