ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 1118, showing: 1 – 20
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Looks pretty good. I think the real key is the averaging that they apply; it produces more natural textures (although not enough in the horse image). I know at least several of us geeky folks frequenting DPReview, when editing images by hand, average the original with the "corrected" version to moderate that "overprocessed" look, but I don't recall seeing that idea used in many research papers....

That said, I'm not a huge fan of the fixed formula, variable parameters, approaches to filter design. Our approach is "Use of Flawed and Ideal Image Pairs to Drive Filter Creation by Genetic Programming," which won a best paper award at Electronic Imaging back in February. Full paper at http://ist.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/contentone/ist/ei/2016/00002016/00000018/art00023

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 00:21 UTC as 1st comment
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1227 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Ok, I'm confused. Being able to shoot 60FPS at full resolution raw would be really important to me. Does this camera do that or not? How many frames can it do that for and can it do that using an (unchipped) manual lens?

Ok. So "Pro Capture" mode delivers 60.6FPS for 50 frames... that's almost wonderful for what I want to do with it; problem is, it sounds like clearing the buffer for another 60.6FPS burst is probably 5-6s. I'm also a little concerned about the variability of the framerate.

Is the DPReview article wrong about Pro Capture only working with Olympus lenses, as GBC suggests?

Sorry to be doubting, but this is a $2K toy, so surprises could really hurt....

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 18:48 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1227 comments in total)

Ok, I'm confused. Being able to shoot 60FPS at full resolution raw would be really important to me. Does this camera do that or not? How many frames can it do that for and can it do that using an (unchipped) manual lens?

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 17:23 UTC as 209th comment | 6 replies
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 First Impressions (221 comments in total)

I think the A6500 is a very nice step for Sony, with a bunch of upgrades (the least of which is the touchscreen). I get the feeling Sony tried hard to keep this under the price of an A7II, which they did -- by about $100.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2016 at 18:13 UTC as 30th comment | 1 reply
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras around $500 (270 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cameracist: My advice? Buy the only camera which has both the "A" and "5100" in it's name.

Right now, the A6000 is selling for the exact same price as the A5100 at BH.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2016 at 02:33 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Once again, we see the unpleasant trend of new high-end models coming out at inflated prices... which hurts even more when a big sensor isn't part of the deal. However, I think the really sad part here is that we don't find the same feature set on the larger-sensor bodies... and yes, I'm talking primarily about Sony. I was expecting more from the deal Olympus and Sony made a while back.

Melchiorum: I think you misread my post. I didn't say Sony kept prices low, I complained that the feature set for Sony is still missing obvious goodies that Olympus has. That said, the pricing on the A6500 looks pretty forgivable in this context....

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 17:35 UTC

Once again, we see the unpleasant trend of new high-end models coming out at inflated prices... which hurts even more when a big sensor isn't part of the deal. However, I think the really sad part here is that we don't find the same feature set on the larger-sensor bodies... and yes, I'm talking primarily about Sony. I was expecting more from the deal Olympus and Sony made a while back.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 13:18 UTC as 75th comment | 3 replies
On article 2016 Holiday Gift Guide: $100-500 (17 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Putting "Panasonic DMC-LX10 (avail Nov 28)", which you say costs $700 and Amazon pre-order has as $697.99, in the "$100-500" group is simply unjustifiable.

Josh, I get it... a little too much excitement about the new toy. ;-)

However, there are a bunch of current-production 1"-sensor compacts under $500, including the DxO One, Canon PowerShot G9X, and the Sony RX100 II. In other words, the idea of a compact 1"-sensor pocketable camera was good, just the representative model choice was out of the price range.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2016 at 19:21 UTC
On article 2016 Holiday Gift Guide: $100-500 (17 comments in total)

Putting "Panasonic DMC-LX10 (avail Nov 28)", which you say costs $700 and Amazon pre-order has as $697.99, in the "$100-500" group is simply unjustifiable.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2016 at 16:00 UTC as 5th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: On a99II
"While it may not be a camera that photographers will ditch their current system over,..."

Did we really need that passive aggressive opinion stated so blatantly for a99II... but not any other camera in this roundup? Which camera in this comparison doesn't deserve the same passive aggressive editorializing?

Was it not good enough to let the second half of the sentence stand on its own merit?
"...the a99 II's feature set makes it one of the most appealing SLR-style cameras on the market."

DPR should consider the second half of that sentence may be reason enough to contradict the first part of the sentence. Think-abouddit... None of the other cameras got a highlight sentence stating what the camera "may not be".

brendon1000: I love the "fact" that A mount is dead... because it means nice used lenses are priced way below comparables from other mounts. Thanks to being the first AF mount, there are arguably more used AF lenses in A-mount than any other mount (as I've confirmed by actual counts from Dyxum, KEH, etc. various times). The catch is that I'm happy using the A-mount lenses along with lots of manual glass on my E-mount bodies. ;-)

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2016 at 12:35 UTC

So, you're basically saying the D750 beats the A7RII because it's cheaper... but the A7II is really the Sony comparable to the D750. In fact, according to the pricing above, like the A7II, the D750 is under $2K and shouldn't be in this category.

I think the A7RII or A99II is the clear "winner" here, but all of these are solid cameras and it really a matter of how you weight different aspects as to which is best.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2016 at 12:20 UTC as 48th comment | 2 replies
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (386 comments in total)

I have to say that I don't like the pricing trends. It used to be that the next generation was more features and better for the same or slightly lower price, but now there are a bunch of body-only crop sensors in the $1200-$2000 range. This sounds a lot like boosting prices to make-up for a dwindling market -- potentially the start of a cycle that doesn't end well for anybody.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 04:20 UTC as 24th comment | 6 replies
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (762 comments in total)

Very cute... although the music is a little too cute. ;-)

My first camera was an Imperial Delta, http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Imperial_Delta

What's more scary is that I have a photo of me taking a photo with it: http://aggregate.org/DIT/firstcam.jpg

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2016 at 01:02 UTC as 284th comment
In reply to:

Mike99999: $2,000

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

TomasCZ72: Read what I wrote -- I said with an A7RII-like sensor, "even MUCH HIGHER pricing would seem perfectly reasonable." To justify a $2K price, I think a 24MP FF sensor should really be the minimum (the A7II is well under $2K, and most of what it lacks relative to this can be summarized as "better firmware").

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 13:32 UTC
In reply to:

Mike99999: $2,000

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

$2K for a micro4/3 body, however well done, is problematic. I think what we're seeing here is the bad place Olympus ends up in thanks to the long-ago decision to go with a 4/3 sensor size -- and making all their lenses target that sensor size. In other words, nearly all of this could be done with a FF sensor like the one in the Sony A7RII (or even larger) and then even much higher pricing would seem perfectly reasonable. This is like building a full-size truck and powering it with a state-of-the-art motorcycle engine.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 10:12 UTC

I figure Trump is somehow involved with this....

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 01:47 UTC as 41st comment

Ok, it runs Linux (just like Sonys do). Will folks be able to run their own code inside?

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 11:52 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

microcolor: And what about rx100 iv or v hs hd video with 1000 fps?))

I got an RX100IV specifically for the high-speed video -- it is excellent. However, record time is very limited and they don't give ROI (region of interest) support for doing higher speeds with fewer pixels. Actually, Sony makes a lot of consumer cameras with sensors that would be capable of scary high framerates with small ROIs, but they don't provide that option....

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 00:25 UTC
In reply to:

Johnny621: This particular Nikon I, serial number 60924, was made in April 1948 and is notable as being the third camera produced by Nikon. What happened to #s 0 thru 60923?

Actually, it's pretty rare that the first unit of any product sold is serial #1. Sometimes, serial numbers encode manufacture date or other production info. I also have often heard that having a higher serial number on a new product helps build consumer confidence, so manufacturers sometimes start with a random "bigly" number.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 02:38 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Very nice summary of the issues. However, just to be clear, problems with Li batteries are very common. The typical precursor to serious problems is the build-up of gasses that causes swelling of the package. If you have a battery that has started to expand, it should be safely discarded -- it is already failing (just not yet spectacularly).

moawkwrd: in my experience, it is disturbingly common for soft Li batteries. For example, 2 of 2 iPhone 5 in my family burst due to swelling batteries (but didn't catch fire) and 1 of my 2 SQ8 mini-DV cameras failed scorching the guts. BTW, these types of failures have been much more rare in hard-cased Li batteries... no more than a few percent among the dozens of hard-cased Li batteries I've used (yes, I use fleets of cameras ;-) ).

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 20:54 UTC
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