Jacques Cornell

Jacques Cornell

Lives in Kazakhstan Almaty, Kazakhstan
Works as a photographer
Has a website at jacquescornell.photography
Joined on Jul 13, 2002
About me:

I've been actively engaged in photography for about 35 years, the past 20 as a professional. I studied photography at the Institute for Contemporary Photography in Tokyo and the International Center of Photography in New York, have photos in the permanent collection at the Kiyosato Museum of Photography in Japan, have taught photography at the Fashion Institute of Technology and the International Center of Photography in New York, co-founded event photography company Happening Photos in New York, and serve clients around the world. I also shoot, print, exhibit and sell fine art travel & landscape photos.

Comments

Total: 597, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

Jeff - This makes sense. It's essentially the traditional LR Desktop/LR Mobile paradigm. The new LR CC desktop app doesn't seem to offer me anything. What concerns me is that in naming LR "Classic" Adobe is signaling that it will be eliminated in favor of the new LR CC in the not-too-distant future. If that happens, I'll have to leave Adobe entirely.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 01:40 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

CapsFlipMD - Thanks for the info. What's the cost of the 5TB plan? How long did it take to upload 3TB? What happens when you want to edit on a tablet? Clearly, the images are not local on it. Do you have to download to the tablet those files you want to edit? Does it do this automatically in the background? How do you manage space on the tablet? Can you export full-rez files on the tablet? Or, is this more like LR Mobile's use of Smart Previews? When you edit on CC, do those adjustments show up in Classic and vice versa?
Not being to do ALL my work in CC and having to bounce back and forth between CC and Classic just looks like a major headache. If I can do my desktop work in Classic and sync Smart Previews to CC, as we did with Mobile, I can see using CC on my iPad Pro. But, I can't see using CC on my desktop, since it doesn't do HDR or pano.
Too, I REALLY don't like Adobe REQUIRING me to upload my whole archive and pay for multiple TB of storage. Boo, hiss.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 15:44 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

The main limitation is the requirement to upload your entire archive to CC. Most pros have more than 1TB of photos, and Adobe offers only 1TB of storage. This makes LR CC an ADJUNCT to LR Classic, not a replacement for it. LR CC looks like a nice casual app, but I simply can't use it to manage my 4TB+ of images. I'll be sticking with LR Classic, but I fear Adobe plans to kill it. The old LR/Mobile model was better, because it allowed us to CHOOSE which images would remain local and which would be synced via the cloud. If Classic/CC still works this way, great. But, the CC desktop app, with its whole-archive upload requirement, is useless to me and pretty much anyone with more than 1GTB of photos.
Am I missing something here?

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 15:25 UTC

When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 15:00 UTC as 9th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

Tom Holly: I love everyone saying “sue him!”

Probably the same people who complain about lawyers and a culture of litigation.

Tom Holly - How about I kick you in the head and see if you turn the other cheek?

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2017 at 15:22 UTC
In reply to:

Tom Holly: I love everyone saying “sue him!”

Probably the same people who complain about lawyers and a culture of litigation.

Probably not. Strange assumption on your part.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2017 at 02:49 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: A mirrorless fan kicking a dSLR shooter. Happens everyday here.

You got that backward.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2017 at 02:47 UTC

I smell criminal charges and/or a lawsuit. I hope both come to pass.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2017 at 02:46 UTC as 108th comment
In reply to:

User9953865401: Buy An Eizo monitor and by happy forever.

leecamera-
Once burned, twice shy. My colleague got burned bad, so I'm disinclined to trust Eizo ever again. Also, when he had his Eizo CG somethingorother next to his PA271, the Eizo suffered the same warm bronze/magenta color cast on neutral gray that I've seen on every other non-Spectraview display. I have a real hard time believing that suddenly Eizo's calibration tool is hot stuff or its commitment to supporting calibration software on future versions of macOS is trustworthy. Eizo's higher prices just adds insult to injury.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 01:56 UTC
In reply to:

User9953865401: Buy An Eizo monitor and by happy forever.

Or buy an NEC Spectraview display, be happy forever, and have some money left in your pocket.
BTW, my colleague was NOT happy forever when Eizo unceremoniously stopped providing calibration software updates to maintain compatibility with new versions of OS X several years ago. It was specific to his particular model, and he felt cheated. He sold his Eizo and bought an NEC PA271. NOW he's happy forever.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 19:32 UTC
In reply to:

fishy wishy: I'd sooner use the latest generation of VA monitors for photo work, AMVA. The deal is that you can get 3x the contrast ratio as long as you sit fairly central to the screen. If you look at it from the sides then the display just looks a bit faded and the tint shifts slightly to green. That doesn't bother me as much as the IPS sheen at more common angles which throws off my perception of exposure.
People used to think VA monitors were only good for movies because it had deep blacks but the pixel response time wasn't very fast back in the day.
The main reason more people are not using VA monitors is that 9/10 have never heard of them or seen them. So be honest before you weigh in- have you?

Simple way to get rid of the "IPS sheen": Hang some black backdrop material behind your chair to reduce reflections on the display, and make sure no light is shining directly on the front of the display (IOW, put a hood on it). These are good practices for ANY photo editing display.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 19:29 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

The comments applied equally to the a7(x)II and a6300 versions. If the a7RIII and a9 have finally caught up, this will represent progress. AFAIK, neither of these is rated for -4EV, though.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 12:01 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

According to many reviews I've read, AF (C- or S-) on the Sony a6000 and a7R tend to bog down in light levels where the Panasonics have no problem at all. I gather you feel Sony has finally caught up. That's all I wanted to know.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 11:21 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

Manual AF will NOT "do just as well" when shooting events in very low light.
Also, note that my first post was a QUESTION. I asked how the new Sony's do in low light. Because up until recently, reviews indicated Sony's low-light AF was mediocre at best. Took you long enough to answer the question.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2017 at 13:59 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

armandino -
You are ignoring the distinction I made so carefully between S-AF and C-AF. You're also ignoring the specific requirement for performance in LOW LIGHT, which was the whole point of my post. In other words, you're moving the goalposts and changing the subject. Panasonic's low-light S-AF is as good as many of the best and most expensive cameras out there. C-AF is a different story. However, as I noted, many cameras with better C-AF in decent light begin to hunt in low light where the Panasonic's S-AF still works lickety-split. Since I often work in very low light, the otherwise superior performance of, say, Sony's C-AF in decent light is of no use to me if it's going to hunt in the dim conditions in which I often work. My Panasonics S-AF in dim conditions where most other cameras simply give up.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2017 at 04:01 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

armandino -
That is simply not true. Panasonic's S-AF is the best I've used, and my previous cameras were Canon 1Ds MkIII and 1D MkIII. See my gear list.
But, if you don't want to listen to me, read some reviews. All the major ones praise Panasonic's S-AF for both speed and low-light performance.
You might be thinking of C-AF, and it's true Panasonic has not been a class-leader here, but they've improved substantially in the past two years. And, cameras with good C-AF, such as Sony's a6000, generally don't focus down to -4EV. In cave-like conditions, excellent S-AF that works is preferable to excellent C-AF that doesn't.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 21:15 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

armandino -
Panasonics do S-AF down to -4EV. Show me another camera that does. There are a few, but not many.
My Panasonic's do S-AF in really low light better than my Canon's ever could.
Check DPR and CameraLabs reviews. Clearly, you have no hands-on experience with low-light AF on modern Panasonics.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 18:39 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

Dr Blackjack -
Mile deep DoF with a 75mm f1.8. Right. Uh huh. Sure.
Troll.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 18:36 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)

How's AF in low light? Sony's long been well behind Panasonic in this regard. Has Sony caught up?

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2017 at 22:11 UTC as 92nd comment | 19 replies
On article Buying Guide: Best cameras for people and events (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

audiobomber: How is the a6500 not in this list? IBIS is a definite advantage vs. the Fuji for event photography with prime lenses.

As a full-time corporate event shooter, I have found IS useful in some cases and not in others. Much of my work is photographing people making presentations, audiences responding, and people interacting. In these cases, IS can help keep the background sharp when I'm dragging the shutter a bit, but I really can't benefit from more than 1-2 stops of IS because more would require dragging the shutter so much that the people would be blurred by motion. The one instance where I really can use all the IS I can get is in doing venue shots and table shots - photos of static objects and architecture in low light. Not having to use a tripod speeds up my work, and in event photography, time is a precious commodity.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2017 at 02:06 UTC
Total: 597, showing: 41 – 60
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