Jacques Cornell

Jacques Cornell

Lives in Kazakhstan Almaty, Kazakhstan
Works as a photographer
Has a website at jacquescornell.photography
Joined on Jul 13, 2002
About me:

I've been actively engaged in photography for about 35 years, the past 20 as a professional. I studied photography at the Institute for Contemporary Photography in Tokyo and the International Center of Photography in New York, have photos in the permanent collection at the Kiyosato Museum of Photography in Japan, have taught photography at the Fashion Institute of Technology and the International Center of Photography in New York, co-founded event photography company Happening Photos in New York, and serve clients around the world. I also shoot, print, exhibit and sell fine art travel & landscape photos.

Comments

Total: 575, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Review (906 comments in total)
In reply to:

colurb: I'm looking to buy a camera, when it came to market is irrelevant to me. I just want the best I can afford/am willing to pay that meets my requirements. To make awards on time to market seems petty and irrelevant. I'm now concerned that other awards made by DPreview aren't based on the capabilities of the camera.

Sniper5 - Except then DPR would get a flood of complaints about a new camera being ranked the same as a 2-year old camera that’s still on the market and clearly inferior.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2018 at 13:07 UTC
In reply to:

thenoilif: There goes that’s theory that some have that the average person knows nothing about photography lol

Photographers have to really step up their game these days as the average consumer is much more knowledable about photography than ever before. We can thank smartphones for that.

Apparently, they don’t know how to hire skilled crafts/tradesmen, though. Which is why inexperienced, unqualified weekend warriors who couldn’t get any other work as photographers think they can “go pro” with weddings. I see this a lot in the event market, as well. Several of my clients who tried to pinch a penny have come back to me after getting lousy work from the lowest bidder.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2018 at 12:58 UTC
In reply to:

Leonp: Having read a bad google translation of the chinese link above I came to the idea the photographer just may have sent the customers the unedited and uncropped pictures.
I never do.

Vik2012 - editing includes culling out the bad ones. As a 15-year event shooter, I deliver only about 20-30% of my shots. Because whenever someone’s speaking or there are multiple people in a shot, I always get shots where a facial expression looks weird or the eyes are closed. Being a pro means shooting until you finally get the shot you want, and culling the rest. If this photog delivered the un-culled take, that was a rookie mistake, not necessarily bad photography.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2018 at 12:54 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Review (906 comments in total)
In reply to:

colurb: I'm looking to buy a camera, when it came to market is irrelevant to me. I just want the best I can afford/am willing to pay that meets my requirements. To make awards on time to market seems petty and irrelevant. I'm now concerned that other awards made by DPreview aren't based on the capabilities of the camera.

Well, capabilities keep improving. If DPR tried to rank without regard to a particular point in history, they'd have to continually downgrade all previous cameras every time a better one appeared.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 14:05 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Review (906 comments in total)
In reply to:

vesa1tahti: D500 is the winner. APS-C vs MFT. Almost of the same size. Better OVF, etc, etc...

"Better OVF"?. Um, you realize the G9 has NO OVF, right? Having used high-end OVFs for decades (Contax RTS III, Pentax 67 II), I much prefer good EVFs for the WYSIWYG preview, info display, in-finder review and virtual horizon, and brighter image in low light. The in-finder review is particularly helpful when doing group portraits, because I can keep the camera to my eye while checking whether I got the shot with everybody's eyes open. With an OVF, I have to chimp the back screen, and subjects take that as a signal the shot is over and start walking away.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 14:02 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Review (906 comments in total)

Glad to see DPR evaluating low-light AF. As an event photographer, I find this info very useful, especially given that some cameras with otherwise very good AF seem to bog down in low light. Panasonic hasn't always gotten credit for its exceptional (S-AF) performance in this regard.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 13:54 UTC as 80th comment
In reply to:

tedolf: It's a weird focal length for a 2x crop factor, and quite frankly I never understood the need for really fast wide angle (if this can be called wide angle) lenses.

Why wouldn't somebody want the 12mm f/2.0 over this?

Tedolph

Um, because the 12mm is too wide? The difference between 12mm and 16mm is quite substantial.

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2018 at 02:09 UTC
In reply to:

Martin JC: Indeed, its easy for 'progressives' to second-guess life or death situations police officers have to make in a split second.

We should perhaps remember events like the cold blooded spate of murders & shootings of police officers as they were ambushed in their patrol cars. And the losses their families suffered.

Overreach by the police is -- of course -- unacceptable. But human mistakes in life or death situations is explicable. I wish the photographer well and it is indeed sad that this happened. But mistakes are not malice and life -- sadly -- is not always fair...

PeteQuad -
One.
So, you're saying that police shootings of unarmed civilians, particularly of black men, have not increased in recent years? Or are you just saying that because something is relatively rare, it's fine, ignore it?
As for "ignoring an individual policeman's life", um, say what? Where did you get that? Holding a policeman accountable for shooting an unarmed civilian is not "ignoring" anything.
Finally, how is pursuing accountability in this case "not just"? You think justice would be hearing the cop's side of it and going, "Oh, well, alright then, it was just an honest mistake. Nothing to see here. Let's all move along"? You say you're not making excuses, but it sure as heck doesn't sound like you want anything done about this wrongful shooting. When you're on the receiving end of a bullet, let's see if you're so cavalier about it.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 12:58 UTC
In reply to:

Martin JC: Indeed, its easy for 'progressives' to second-guess life or death situations police officers have to make in a split second.

We should perhaps remember events like the cold blooded spate of murders & shootings of police officers as they were ambushed in their patrol cars. And the losses their families suffered.

Overreach by the police is -- of course -- unacceptable. But human mistakes in life or death situations is explicable. I wish the photographer well and it is indeed sad that this happened. But mistakes are not malice and life -- sadly -- is not always fair...

PeterQuad - There are too many fatal "accidents" going on these days for a "both sides" discussion to be productive. What's needed is accountability. Nobody's talking about "both sides" and "accidents" in cases of shootings of police. The double-standard has been so obvious for so long, it's time to drop the fig leaf and face the fact that there are serious institutional problems with policing. Whether this particular case was a result of insufficient training, a sleep-deprived officer, ill will, or whatever, the results of his misjudgment are serious, and the consequences for him must be similarly serious. Without that, nothing will change.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 15:46 UTC
In reply to:

Martin JC: Indeed, its easy for 'progressives' to second-guess life or death situations police officers have to make in a split second.

We should perhaps remember events like the cold blooded spate of murders & shootings of police officers as they were ambushed in their patrol cars. And the losses their families suffered.

Overreach by the police is -- of course -- unacceptable. But human mistakes in life or death situations is explicable. I wish the photographer well and it is indeed sad that this happened. But mistakes are not malice and life -- sadly -- is not always fair...

PeteQuad - When there's clear malfeasance, considering "both sides" is a denial of justice and an invitation to further abuse. If you're going to let bad cops off the hook because they face stress and risk, you have to similarly let criminals off the hook for mitigating factors such as financial hardship, bad upbringings, poor education and no job prospects. I don't see this "both sides" approach being applied to both sides. It's mostly a just free pass for bad cops.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 15:14 UTC
In reply to:

Martin JC: Indeed, its easy for 'progressives' to second-guess life or death situations police officers have to make in a split second.

We should perhaps remember events like the cold blooded spate of murders & shootings of police officers as they were ambushed in their patrol cars. And the losses their families suffered.

Overreach by the police is -- of course -- unacceptable. But human mistakes in life or death situations is explicable. I wish the photographer well and it is indeed sad that this happened. But mistakes are not malice and life -- sadly -- is not always fair...

PeteQuad -
This is why the "both sides" approach doesn't work:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/christopher-ballew-us-police-break-black-mans-leg-baton-video-arrest-california-pasadena-a8118316.html

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 14:59 UTC

Open carry laws are only going to make this kind of thing more common. If the mere presence of a weapon, never mind a camera, is cause to shoot, the police are going to run out of bullets.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 14:44 UTC as 26th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Teila Day: "The body camera footage shows Grimm, who was shot in the chest and grazed in the shoulder, telling Shaw that he had both **flashed his car lights and waved** in order to alert the deputy to his presence."

He should sue. The officer should've been fired. That could've been some teenager taking photographs. The general public doesn't have to "alert" an officer that they are taking photographs, that's just part of being a cop; either you can manage the risk or you can't. If you can't, find another line of work. I'd like to see the cop put in prison.

Conversely, I'm 100% for cops shooting (or beating to a bloody pulp) people who throw rocks at cops, block traffic, resist arrest, lead cops on a high speed chase, drunk drivers, and common criminals recorded mid-crime (shoot those criminals dead where they stand!)

Holding cops to a higher standard isn't a one-way street. People get more time for shooting cops, then cops go to prison + more time for shooting the general public!

Teila Day -
"I'm 100% for cops shooting (or beating to a bloody pulp) people who...block traffic"
You are one sick puppy. May you fail to signal a turn or notice your broken tail light, or get caught jaywalking. Better put body armor on your Christmas wish list.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 14:39 UTC
In reply to:

digilt: Police work is dangerous, but shooting first and ask question later is not the reason we need a police force.

I hope better training and accountability will go a long way to reduce this kind of grave mistakes.

Sadly, there is no accountability, as we have seen over and over and over and over and over...

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 14:35 UTC
In reply to:

brn: There are a lot of folk in this forum that want to believe cops like running around shooting people. You're wrong.

When an officer shoots someone, it is usually a career ending move. Not because they did something wrong, but because it goes against what they believe in. Believe it or not, most law enforcement officers chose the profession because they want to help people. Killing someone, even an evil someone, is extremely traumatic. Even if determined to be a clean shoot, the officer will typically resign within a year.

Teila Day - I take it you were home schooled. You obviously don't know any teachers.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 14:33 UTC
In reply to:

Martin JC: Indeed, its easy for 'progressives' to second-guess life or death situations police officers have to make in a split second.

We should perhaps remember events like the cold blooded spate of murders & shootings of police officers as they were ambushed in their patrol cars. And the losses their families suffered.

Overreach by the police is -- of course -- unacceptable. But human mistakes in life or death situations is explicable. I wish the photographer well and it is indeed sad that this happened. But mistakes are not malice and life -- sadly -- is not always fair...

Martin - So, um, what? We're not allowed to have anything in our hands when there's a police officer around? Or put our hands in our pockets? Sure, cops jobs are difficult. They know this when they sign up. And, they ostensibly get training in identifying threats. This is a case of malpractice, pure and simple. And, failing to pursue justice in such cases simply encourages further sloppiness or intentional abuse.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

jeffcarlson -
$50/month? Absurd. Forget it. Total non-starter.
"LRMobile" and the new LR CC are the same thing, yes? Or rather, the latter has replace the former?
Glad to hear about HDR and Pano.
Looks like I'll continue to use LR Classic as the control center on my Mac and maybe do my culling and light editing of synced Smart Previews on an iPad. The "Classic" moniker, though, makes me doubt Adobe will keep it around for long. Once they ditch it and LR CC is the only choice on desktop and mobile, the requirement to store ALL images in the cloud will mark the end of Adobe for me.
Thanks for the info.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 22:50 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

Jeff - This makes sense. It's essentially the traditional LR Desktop/LR Mobile paradigm. The new LR CC desktop app doesn't seem to offer me anything. What concerns me is that in naming LR "Classic" Adobe is signaling that it will be eliminated in favor of the new LR CC in the not-too-distant future. If that happens, I'll have to leave Adobe entirely.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 01:40 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

CapsFlipMD - Thanks for the info. What's the cost of the 5TB plan? How long did it take to upload 3TB? What happens when you want to edit on a tablet? Clearly, the images are not local on it. Do you have to download to the tablet those files you want to edit? Does it do this automatically in the background? How do you manage space on the tablet? Can you export full-rez files on the tablet? Or, is this more like LR Mobile's use of Smart Previews? When you edit on CC, do those adjustments show up in Classic and vice versa?
Not being to do ALL my work in CC and having to bounce back and forth between CC and Classic just looks like a major headache. If I can do my desktop work in Classic and sync Smart Previews to CC, as we did with Mobile, I can see using CC on my iPad Pro. But, I can't see using CC on my desktop, since it doesn't do HDR or pano.
Too, I REALLY don't like Adobe REQUIRING me to upload my whole archive and pay for multiple TB of storage. Boo, hiss.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 15:44 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: When LR CC does Merge to Pano and Merge to HDR, and doesn't require uploading all my photos (4TB) to CC, then I'll consider it. Until then, it's a hobbyist app.

The main limitation is the requirement to upload your entire archive to CC. Most pros have more than 1TB of photos, and Adobe offers only 1TB of storage. This makes LR CC an ADJUNCT to LR Classic, not a replacement for it. LR CC looks like a nice casual app, but I simply can't use it to manage my 4TB+ of images. I'll be sticking with LR Classic, but I fear Adobe plans to kill it. The old LR/Mobile model was better, because it allowed us to CHOOSE which images would remain local and which would be synced via the cloud. If Classic/CC still works this way, great. But, the CC desktop app, with its whole-archive upload requirement, is useless to me and pretty much anyone with more than 1GTB of photos.
Am I missing something here?

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 15:25 UTC
Total: 575, showing: 1 – 20
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