Wahl

Lives in Switzerland Switzerland
Works as a Engineer
Has a website at www.holger.ch
Joined on Aug 25, 2007

Comments

Total: 17, showing: 1 – 17
On article The gear that got away: reader responses (237 comments in total)

The only camera I regret having sold is a black Leica M6 TTL with the tiny 35mm f/2.8 Zeiss lens. Never sell a Leica... The camera I regret never having bought is the Nikon Df: with all the critics about the D600-style AF and other things I missed the important points: the sensor, and the concept. Even heavily used ones these days still sell for nearly what they cost new at the times... should have bought one when it was still in production.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2020 at 05:29 UTC as 71st comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

4sofnature: I used to own an X100F due to its rangefinder style design.
But since A6400 came out with the Sigma trio lineup, amazing AF, more compact size, decent video quality, I have made the switch completely.
For Fuji users out there. XE3 is more versatile unless you really need the OVF.
For just P&S, LX100ii, G7X, RX100 is also more versatile and pocketable.

Had the X100F, now own the RX100 III, and I'll be happily switching back to X100V as soon as possible: as nice as the RX100 zoom, size and portability may be, IQ is absolutely not comparable to what I got from my X100F. Could it be a faulty sample? Don't know, but having tried everything, every setting, only shooting RAW and working in LR, RX100 IQ is not half of what I get out of the X100F. It's a pity, since small size and nice quality of the body are in fact something I will miss. But in the end it's all about pictures... and with the iPhone 11 Pro not that far away in IQ, the RX100 is kind of obsolete, at least to me.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2020 at 17:45 UTC
On article What the Z50 tells us about Nikon's APS-C strategy (677 comments in total)

I am fed up with the endless "beginners" talk: I own a Z6, D750, D5600 and several lenses. All of these cameras are used professionally, i.e. to earn money. Not with landscapes or models, but on the engineering and building side of life. I am absolutely happy with the Z50: Nikon finally managed to create a APS-C-Body with all the controls I find on my Z6. I love the D5600 (with the 10-20mm attached I use it for construction site panos for technical documentation, it weights half of my D750 with Tamrons 15-30 zoom), but I hate the "amateur" layout of its controls. Even with Nikon and dpreview talking about a beginners camera, to me the Z50 finally fills the gap: a smaller version of my most used camera, with professional-level controls and perfect IQ in a very small size. Add two or three small primes plus a 10-20mm zoom, and this would be my perfect construction site set, whereas my Z6 is mostly used for people and events. Small pro, not beginner, that's what Z50 should be.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 18:20 UTC as 141st comment | 6 replies

Great offer! As super wide is something I only use occasionally, and then mostly on a tripod, I don't care for image stabilization. Whoever does need it: get the 15-30mm version. I am rather looking forward to the new lenses small size, light weight and low price. Hope it's as sharp as advertised!

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2018 at 07:50 UTC as 64th comment

Read the message carefully: "currently marketed exclusively through its e-commerce arm, the Nikon Store". In most countries this has never been the case. And not being able to buy through a Nikon owned e-store does not mean an item is "grey". "Grey" imports only apply to the heavily protected US market, in most other countries I can buy any Nikon article from anywhere in the world, and it will have warranty and everything. In other words: Brazilians will probably continue to buy Nikon, just not through Nikon itself, but, as in many other countries, through local retailers, national and international e-commerce. And other than in the US, every item will be under warranty, even if at some point I may have to send it in for service to a service point outside brazil.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2017 at 04:46 UTC as 87th comment | 3 replies
On article Leica Boss: Hands-on with new Leica M10 (169 comments in total)

Finally... for all the "non-traditionalists", computer-aided photography freaks and Leica haters out there: it's all about simplicity. And craftsmanship in rather small numbers. And it's about a small company in Germany, the only one left producing in Germany and giving work and income to local people. Noone is forced to buy a M, TL or S, at least that I know of. So: if you like mechanical perfection, absolute simplicity and the concept that Leica optimized over more than 60 years (which Fujifilm copied to perfection and created a real demand for), if you understand costing and calculation in small companies and units and can raise the money involved... get one, if you like to. If this is not the case, well, there are enough alternatives out there, from really wonderful cameras and lenses Made in Japan down to offshored junk. The choice is yours, to each his own, but please stop bashing any products for no reason at all.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 04:33 UTC as 19th comment | 2 replies

Billions may be a bit exaggerated, but some 100'000 or so would be perfect: if you use a picture of a person for advertisement, a signed consent is an absolut must. Especially if the picture is used by a large company generating millions or even billions. In advertisement it does not even matter if the person itself created the demand or had any influence on the success of the campaign: it's all about consent for using the picture, nothing else. I would not like to appear in the ads of some companies, having people believe I would eventually support them. To me, if the case proves to be true (no consent, but a widespread ad campaign), a large sum would be nothing but correct. It's part of our business as photographers to respect certain rules, and in this business we know them. Consent of people photographed is something absolutely basic, there just is no excuse not to get it prior to publishing anything.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 05:46 UTC as 68th comment
On article Gear of the Year: Richard's choice - Fujifilm X-T2 (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

Brian Thomas: Richard,

As you probably know there is a growing sense of disappointment with the "frustratingly slow" joystick echoing thru the Fuji online forums. Some users restrict the number of focus points available to deal with this perceived shortcoming. Previously, in comments here below one of your Fuji articles you suggested that a properly implemented touch-screen might be a better way to navigate a sea of 400 focus points. However, while your early criticisms of the "laggy" Sony a6500 touch screen implementation have been "seconded" by almost every review I've seen, I haven't seen any formal reviews criticize the speed of the Fuji joystick. So, I'd appreciate it if you commented about that here. Are you truly as satisfied with the Fuji joystick's utility as the above article implies?

Brian

After a few thousand pictures with my X-T2, I can report that the joystick is not only fast enough (definitely), but it really works perfectly, with all AF points. I am happy there is no touch-screen: no changing focus points with my nose, no fingerprints on the screen. To me, touchscreens are perfect for smartphones and p&s without viewfinder, not for serious cameras. The joystick is perfect, better than anyhing I have worked with until today.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 17:47 UTC
In reply to:

ChapelThrill23: As a Nikon user I would say It better be pretty awesome to justify paying double and having twice the weight of the exceptional Nikon 85 1.8G.

I own the SP 35mm f/1.8 VC for my Nikon D750, and it's absolutely wonderful. With its metal barrel and weather sealing, the sleek design and optical performance, this lens is completely different from Tamrons old plastic cheapoes (and even those performed well IQ-wise, just think of the famous 90mm macro). I had the Nikon 85mm f/1.8, and while its optical qualities are outstanding, it's too long to shoot handheld without flash in ceremonies and lowlight places. I will get the Tamron as soon as it becomes available in my place.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2016 at 05:35 UTC
On article Nikon D3300 Review (252 comments in total)

Just ordered my D3300 with 35mm f/1.8 DX as everyday travel camera. Had the D3100 before: while my D800 and D600 are the perfect tools for specific projects and events, the D3xxx is the one I just throw into my office rucksack every day, sometimes just by itself, sometimes in combination with the little BeeFree-tripod and pano-head. The D3xxx never let me down: with its light weight and robust construction it takes more abuse than most so called semipro bodies. Best value for money you can buy!

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2014 at 07:02 UTC as 19th comment | 4 replies
On article Nikon D3300 Review (252 comments in total)
In reply to:

hondagrl57: The only thing I am not being able to learn is how to use the zoom to get far away shots of my birds like the old cannon I am used to with the pull lever.. any ideas on this one appreciated. ( I mean get far away things up close and personal) Am I needing a special lens for this one?

1. Read the manual.
2. Turn the large ring on the zoom. No lever on DSLRs.
3. Get a longer lens. Standard zoom is not long enough for birds, you will need the 55-300 or similar.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2014 at 06:45 UTC

Maybe Hasselblad finally understands they could sell more and better with the resurrection of the V-System in combination with digital backs than rebadging mediocre Sony cameras. I hope they will...

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2014 at 08:51 UTC as 18th comment
On article Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary (587 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wahl: Now, if all of you who want an FX sensor, please line up at the Sony A7 stand, and the APS-C folks at the Fuji and Sony APS-C desks, all with their huge and heavy lenses, thank you. For the rest, come with us and enjoy this wonderful system: really small lenses, an extremely wide range (6.7 to 300 mm within the 1 system, nearly unlimited with the ft1-adapter), a sensor of perfect quality, and now finally a real user interface. I love this system, although my main camera is a D800, one of my V1 is with me most of the time. Kudos to Nikon that they started this system, not an alternativ to my dslr, but an addition. And regarding costs: you get what you pay for. Not Sony, but Nikon quality.

@sempull tampush: take a sony, take a nikon, and feel the difference. my rx100 is compact and sturdy, but my 1 v1 beats it.
@shaocaholica: yes, exactly. that is the reason why i want something small. the moment i want to carry heavy lenses, i don't need some aps-c or a7, i use a real camera that focuses in near darkness, gives perfect results and has a perfect ui. if i want to travel light: nikon 1. where's the problem?

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 07:45 UTC
On article Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary (587 comments in total)

Now, if all of you who want an FX sensor, please line up at the Sony A7 stand, and the APS-C folks at the Fuji and Sony APS-C desks, all with their huge and heavy lenses, thank you. For the rest, come with us and enjoy this wonderful system: really small lenses, an extremely wide range (6.7 to 300 mm within the 1 system, nearly unlimited with the ft1-adapter), a sensor of perfect quality, and now finally a real user interface. I love this system, although my main camera is a D800, one of my V1 is with me most of the time. Kudos to Nikon that they started this system, not an alternativ to my dslr, but an addition. And regarding costs: you get what you pay for. Not Sony, but Nikon quality.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 04:15 UTC as 67th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

grafli: Well this lens is obsolet with the existence of the Sigma 18-35mm F1.8

No, sorry, it's not: it's Nikon, not Sigma. It's smaller and lighter. And it's a prime. If I need a wide angle zoom, I will take the 16-35 with f/4 and VR. If I need something wide open, I'll take my primes. Just my personal opinion, nothing to worry about.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2014 at 15:17 UTC

Nikon needs to listen to it's customers and to the market: request for a "pro" coolpix has been there since the beginning of digital camera sales. Nothing happened. The "A" is perfect, but arrived much too late.Same with the compact system camera: the 1 is perfect for me, but with 4/3 and APS-C around, there is no market left, especially at the cost of the camera. And the message that production plan of the 1 will be "reconsidered" without specific information won't drive people into investing in System 1 lenses. Nikon, wake up! I will not buy another D800, what many photographers need is a second and smaller camera system. And with the Panasonic GX-7 or Olympus OMD around, why should I sink my money into a Nikon 1? (I did, by the way, because I am a Nikonian, but it was not an easy decision even to me).

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2013 at 04:09 UTC as 157th comment | 1 reply
On article Canon announces EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM wide zoom (54 comments in total)

funny it looks like Nikons 6.7-13 mm wide angle for the 1 system. Is this the global new lens design, or is it just copy + paste?

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 04:53 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
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