John Mason

John Mason

Lives in United States Battle Ground, IN, United States
Works as a Works in a software firm
Joined on Mar 19, 2001
About me:

Cycle, Hike, Run, Explore and take a lot of pictures as I wander

Comments

Total: 38, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Hands on: Olympus 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x (716 comments in total)
In reply to:

onlyfreeman: I'd like to see a comparison image with some FF options people are talking about, any chance DPR has a Sony 200-600mm lens on a shelf somewhere?

I've got the 200-600 Sony and use it with the A7r4. I also have the Em1x and 300 f4. What interests me with the new option is the coming Bird AI focusing. If this refers to BIF then the Olympus solution could be a killer kit. The Sony IS is not bad on the 200-600 but the Olympus will be better and with the AI focusing, I'd just use the red-dot sight on BIF and fire away. The 300 f4 is a tad sharper than the Sony but it's very close and one is a prime and one is a zoom. I also have the 100-400 Sony so comparisons will be interesting once I can get one to play with a bit - if Roberts get's one in stock.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2020 at 20:31 UTC

gazing into my crystal ball I see:

1. dropping the lower end products
2. adding more computational photography features
3. focusing on their higher end products leveraging the biggest value in the acquisition which are the well thought out lens line ups.

The wild card is leveraging any new sensor tech. Some break through sensor tech could be a game changer if the shot noise comes down. Sensor progress has stalled for a few years except for Sony's stacked sensors but that didn't really change shot noise (worse than their existing BSI sensors in fact). There are patents in new tech in organic based sensors that could open up the competitiveness of these smaller lenses when coupled with a quantum leap (pun intended) in sensor technology.

Link | Posted on Oct 1, 2020 at 03:52 UTC as 71st comment | 1 reply
On article Hands-on with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 III (189 comments in total)

Processor speed question.....The faster processor in the em1-mk3 vs the 2 older processors in the X, if someone could do a timing of processing the hand held hi rez mode shot between the 2 cameras, that'd be an indicator of how much faster the single processor is. I'm guessing the X is still faster. I'd like to upgrade my mk2 but if the speed isn't there for the computational features I'll likely hang on to the mk2 as my, now seldom used, smaller spare.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2020 at 09:49 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On article Hands-on with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 III (189 comments in total)

I have the em1m2 and the x. One of the things I love on the X is the eye relief of the viewfinder as I wear glasses. I wonder if this has been improved on the 3. I also shoot another FF brand and though the clarity is higher on the FF evf, the X still has the most usable one for me due to being able to see edge to edge in real life shooting without moving my head around. I do use the x computational features often, especially hand held hi rez mode. But if the eye relief isn't there, I'll stick with my current combo.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2020 at 09:46 UTC as 14th comment
On article Have your say: Most important cameras of the 2010s (412 comments in total)

Well, the A9 was easy to drag up as it's ground breaking in so many ways, but what's missing is the Em1x which is ground breaking for it's many useful computational photography aspects. The Sony with it's fast read out sensor and silent shutter is a major breakthrough that'll trickle down to all sensors at some point imo and computational photography, while leading in cell phones, will change everything ultimately, thus the Em1x nomination ('cept it's not in the list to pick from)

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2019 at 05:44 UTC as 74th comment
In reply to:

Daft Punk: I like the idea of the EM1X - but I want to see firmware updates and evolution of the computational aspect. Olympus seems a bit stagnant here.

More work on animal AF ( even bird AF ! ) and development of hand hand high res and you can take my money.

Thanks for the clarification. Yes - a bird mode would be nice. I think one of the problems with bird af is a bird can be so many shapes all withing a single individual. The af-tracking on the Em1x where you simply specify a target and it'll stick on that shape and follow it anywhere in the frame works well for none problematically recognized objects. While not quite as quick and sticky as the A9 it's about the same as I'm seeing in the A7mIV. If you shoot Olympus or Sony and have not tried this whole frame, lock af on a pattern and let the camera track it, this has changed the whole way I focus in both systems. I just frame what I want in the center and half press, then reframe and that focus spot will stick where I started it. This is way better than using the joystick.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2019 at 15:00 UTC
In reply to:

Daft Punk: I like the idea of the EM1X - but I want to see firmware updates and evolution of the computational aspect. Olympus seems a bit stagnant here.

More work on animal AF ( even bird AF ! ) and development of hand hand high res and you can take my money.

I'm confused. Olympus have developed it. It's part of the Em1x feature set. I use these 3 computational photography tools built in the the Em1x often:

1. Hand Held Hi-rez
2. Hand Held Focus Stacking
3. Hand Held ND

I guess I don't understand your original post or later reply at all.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2019 at 05:10 UTC
In reply to:

QuarryCat: Olympus is still dreaming
- they were withe the E1 and FT Pro lenses and they do it again now.
When mft sensor evolves - full frame will evolve further - they will never close the gap.
And if you look at PF or DO Glas, Olympus is to big and to heavy with a very small sensor.
I have and love my E-M1II and the 2.8/12-40 mm or 4/12-100 mm and others for traveling. But for professional use in wildlife, Olympus can't compete with Canon, Nikon, nor Sony.

That's true in the sense of physics. The larger sensor will gather more light. Thus the GFX100 is better for low light than the Sony A9 which is better than the EM1x. The actual question is when is a sensor of a given size good enough for the intended output. That equation has been shifting to the smaller sensors for some time such that much of the time you little cell phone sensor is good enough. For great quality while hiking/traveling, the m4/3 size is a great compromise for many peeps. Olympus sees this as their primary market.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2019 at 20:30 UTC
In reply to:

Daft Punk: I like the idea of the EM1X - but I want to see firmware updates and evolution of the computational aspect. Olympus seems a bit stagnant here.

More work on animal AF ( even bird AF ! ) and development of hand hand high res and you can take my money.

Hand held hi rez has arrived with the EM1x. I also use hand held focus stacking which isn't talked about as much but very useful. Also the hand held smooth waterfall shots using the electronic ND filter. That's 3 computational photography aspects of the EM1x I love and use often.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2019 at 20:19 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoRotterdam: It beats me why you would buy an Olympus camera, when you can get smaller and lighter ILC’s from Sony, Canon, Fuji and Nikon who all sport a sensor that has less noise at higher ISO’s for a lower price. Except the birder.

Olympus camera and lenses are smaller than their FF counterparts as physics dictates. Yes, you can focus (pun intended) on just the bodies and find some FF bodies that are smaller than the largest Olympus body (requires ignoring the built in grip missing on the FF body), but the OP is repeating a red herring argument here ignoring the total effective system size.

The Em1m2 with 12-100 is the best hiking combo package I know of. Near macro, great telephoto, linked IS, and sharp throughout. There is nothing in FF that can compete with the flexibility, size and weight of that little combo.

(and I shoot both FF and m4/3 and have for years. Reading comments from people dissing m4/3 that don't actually use it is always entertaining)

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2019 at 20:14 UTC
In reply to:

khaw: 36 MP that’s 50% above 24 MP. Great if true.
That bodes well for improving other features.

But as their main sports camera a little more headroom for cropping can be a good thing. I bet the 36mp sensor with even faster electronic shutter capability. Perhaps you can get your low light 12mp effect with a built in pixel binning option :)

Long ago rumors about this new sensor implies something breakthrough like in noise and low light capability. We'll know in a few weeks!

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2019 at 20:55 UTC
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

TN Args: I got the impression from reports that HHHR mode is very usable for portraits, unlike tripod HR mode, which requires pixel-perfect non-motion in the scene.

But the article suggests HHHR is also not good for portraits. Worth double checking.

Could be, or it could be that once you combine 16 images with movement between, you do indeed get all color information per pixel or you could if you wrote it that way. This is why moire and other bayer processing artifacts are gone with this process. The camera has a 50mp mapping surface to plug values into and loads values into it which will each r or g or b value at the pixel level. Once the totals are added up for that pixel you end up with full color for that individual pixel without referencing the adjacent pixels. If I was programming the super resolution software that's how I'd do it anyway. The look of the pictures looks like a similar method has been done by Olympus.

I've read that the Olympus algorithm uses the IS to move the sensor while also accounting for the hand movement to get up to 16 shots what are not in the same position at the pixel level. The light path through the lens is also new each shot which can be better than the tripod Hirez method.

Link | Posted on May 31, 2019 at 05:40 UTC
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

James A Rinner: I want one...badly, but I can't afford one right now. I am slowly getting my personal collection of hundreds of vintage cameras and lenses on eBay to make the purchase.

For background information; I am a retired professional photographer (over 1200 weddings, national and international awards for wedding and portrait photography and gallery shows) who has shot with large format, medium format (my favorite with an almost complete Hasselblad outfit) and 35mm film cameras for most of my life.

Having my knowledge and background; why would I choose M43? I chose it because in the overall scheme of things M43 just works. I have never had a person say, while looking at my digital or printed photos, that my images suffered from too small a sensor. I also like the complete weather-sealing of the bodies and lenses. Even with the weight and size of the E-M1X body, the total package is smaller and lighter when comparing equal specs.

My post is a bit long so please see the next comment.

James, great comments. Most any system sold today can produce great results. The photographer is by far the most limiting factor.

Em1x has some compelling attributes with it's computational photography. Hand held focus stacking when doing Macro is amazing and generally never mentioned. Hand Held Hi Rez is also amazing.

I don't get people's comments stating about the size and weight. The same lens selected for a particular photographic purpose is much smaller in this system. I think you'll love it.

So many comments from peeps that have not tried it. I've never understood all the uproar at Olympus over the years. I guess it threatens people for some reason.

Hope your ebay sales go well so you can start enjoying your new photographic tool!

Link | Posted on May 30, 2019 at 10:11 UTC
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

TN Args: I got the impression from reports that HHHR mode is very usable for portraits, unlike tripod HR mode, which requires pixel-perfect non-motion in the scene.

But the article suggests HHHR is also not good for portraits. Worth double checking.

HHHR mode is good for portraits. Where I like HHHR mode best is in the per pixel color resolution, low noise, and coupled with a 1.2 pro Olympus lens, just amazing on the transition borders of in focus to the background. It's quick on a per shot basis, but long on the processing. So fine for portraits or food photography, indoor museum photography, product photography (where hand held focus stacking is the bomb too). indoor architectural photography, indoor cathedral shots, etc. I shoot the A9 too but if I have textures and want the foveon look with full color resolution at the pixel level, the Em1x beats either Sony pretty easily.

Link | Posted on May 30, 2019 at 09:47 UTC
On article Olympus OM-D E-M1X review (2389 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Mason: In your review, I'd be very interested in how the Hi-Rez mode holds up with lenses like the 12-100. Does the resolution capability of these lenses keep up with that the sensor in Hi-Rez mode is able to capture? If not with the 12-100 how about with a top m4/3rds prime?

I shoot both m4/3 and Sony and I love the super sharp results of the 35 1.4 and Sony a7rIII. It's one of my go to combinations. But for hiking in the drizzle of the inside Passage this August I'm liking the idea of the 12-100 and a 150-400 for wildlife. Getting humpback shots or video from a small boat might really favor this camera in combo with the 150-400.

i would love if this was explored some in your review. (how much hi rez is available on real lenses)

I'm going to a test this weekend of the Em1m2 on a tripod in hi-rez mode with the 12-100 vs the Sony 35 f1.4 + a7r3 and see how they compare. I do like the true color per pixel of the hi-rez mode for landscape photography especially on edges.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2019 at 17:23 UTC
On article Olympus OM-D E-M1X review (2389 comments in total)

In your review, I'd be very interested in how the Hi-Rez mode holds up with lenses like the 12-100. Does the resolution capability of these lenses keep up with that the sensor in Hi-Rez mode is able to capture? If not with the 12-100 how about with a top m4/3rds prime?

I shoot both m4/3 and Sony and I love the super sharp results of the 35 1.4 and Sony a7rIII. It's one of my go to combinations. But for hiking in the drizzle of the inside Passage this August I'm liking the idea of the 12-100 and a 150-400 for wildlife. Getting humpback shots or video from a small boat might really favor this camera in combo with the 150-400.

i would love if this was explored some in your review. (how much hi rez is available on real lenses)

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2019 at 04:57 UTC as 319th comment | 2 replies
On article Pentax K-1 Mark II: What you need to know (461 comments in total)
In reply to:

J A C S: What "sounds crazy" is a technique supported by PhotoAcute, now not in development any more, and something that can be done manually - there is a PetaPixel article about it.

The nice feature I like about PhotoAcute for super-resolution is it's 'remove moving object' feature. One superresolution picture I did this summer of of waterton lake from the bear hump hike and there were a couple of fast moving boats in the lake that even the 10 shots in 1/2 a second would have presented a problem. PhotoAcute handles that automatically. With the photoshop method I'm not sure how I'd handle that.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2018 at 15:30 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Mark II: What you need to know (461 comments in total)
In reply to:

J A C S: What "sounds crazy" is a technique supported by PhotoAcute, now not in development any more, and something that can be done manually - there is a PetaPixel article about it.

I still use PhotoAcute to do the hi rez, in this case with a Sony A9. Works pretty spectacularly. I just lie to it and pick any lens with a similar focal length and the hi rez mode works very well.

I just set the A9 to it's 20 fps electronic shutter mode and shoot about 1/2 sec on landscapes and process later.

I'll need to check out the PetaPixel article.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2018 at 05:54 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1105 comments in total)

As I love shooting with sharp primes and most of these have no image stabilization, the Nikon offering is a no go. While the EyeAF was discussed in the article, EyeAF with a sharp prime and image stabilization tips the scales pretty heavily in favor of the Sony for available light, people shooting.

Also, the ability to see exposure compensation in real time is a huge plus as well though not given as much weight in this comparison as I feel it deserves.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 21:30 UTC as 130th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Dimitris Servis: It seems to be extremely difficult for people to grasp the simple fact that f2.8 @ 1/1000 is the same EV regardless of the format.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposure_value

Here's a visual property, since you're asking. Overall noise in a final output print is one factor that depends on total light rather than just exposure value. For most shooting, there is overlap between systems with various sensor sizes where you can get similar output. The differences show up on the edges of that overlap. I shoot FF and m43rds and you learn to deal with each systems strengths and weaknesses. I just finished my 4th trip to Carlsbad Caverns, 2 times with m43 and 2 times with FF over the course of 17 years alternating the form factors over the years. These differences are obvious in shooting situations like that. The current m4/3 cameras far outperform my old Canon FF, but the Sony FF crush the latest m4/3 in that situation. The general rule is more photons, lower noise given the same sensor tech. This favors FF.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2017 at 21:32 UTC
Total: 38, showing: 1 – 20
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