James Wages

James Wages

Lives in Japan Nissin City, Aichi-ken, Japan
Works as a Managerial
Joined on Feb 14, 2002

Comments

Total: 78, showing: 61 – 78
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On article Manfrotto announces carbon fiber BeFree tripod (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

JapanAntoine: I looked at the Befree very carefully and even went to the shop to buy it a few months ago, but then I discovered the Velbon UT-53Q (thanks to the sales guy there).
I can't even understand why Velbon isn't better known (probably a distribution issue). Their UT series have a very good ballhead, are sturdier than the Befree and much much more compact!
To anyone considering a travel tripod, have a look at the Velbon UT!

Another great operational video of the Velbon UT-53Q is found beneath the product photo on the following page:

http://item.rakuten.co.jp/shasinyasan/4907990324726/

And there' same comparison review of the Manfrotto BeFree vs. the Velbon UT-53Q here:

http://translate.google.co.jp/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&u=http://kamera-accessory.seesaa.net/article/381573571.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3DVelbon%2BUT-53Q%26client%3Dsafari%26hl%3Den

The English translation of that review is hideous, but towards the end you can see very clearly the conclusion — the Manfrotto is assessed as beauty over function, and so the nod is given to the UT-53Q.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 15:23 UTC
On article Manfrotto announces carbon fiber BeFree tripod (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

JapanAntoine: I looked at the Befree very carefully and even went to the shop to buy it a few months ago, but then I discovered the Velbon UT-53Q (thanks to the sales guy there).
I can't even understand why Velbon isn't better known (probably a distribution issue). Their UT series have a very good ballhead, are sturdier than the Befree and much much more compact!
To anyone considering a travel tripod, have a look at the Velbon UT!

Wow. That UT-53Q looks like a winner:

http://youtu.be/A7NQyaqyR6I

DPReview needs to review it ASAP. I'd like to see how they feel it compares head to head with the big name travel tripods. And heck, I don't see why they call them "travel" seeing that these look like they could be used as an everyday tripod, especially for lighterweight gear.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 14:03 UTC
In reply to:

James Wages: Interesting how Panasonic felt compelled to put 120fps (at 720p) and even 240fps (at 480p) in this wearable while the fastest speed they bestowed upon their "high end" GH4 is 96fps (at 1080p). Is smooth slow motion an unwanted feature among pros and prosumers, targeting only at iPhone and wearable users?

Fine and well. But what technologically (or thermally) prevents the GH4 hardware from doing 120fps in 720p?

It would simply appear that Lumix engineers have been too busy to implement better slow-mo capabilities in the firmware for the sake of meeting the April-end ship date. As such, one can only hope that a firmware update will follow from Panasonic, if not to give us better slow-mo frame rates, at least to give GH4 firmware hackers the potential to enable faster frame rates.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

James Wages: Interesting how Panasonic felt compelled to put 120fps (at 720p) and even 240fps (at 480p) in this wearable while the fastest speed they bestowed upon their "high end" GH4 is 96fps (at 1080p). Is smooth slow motion an unwanted feature among pros and prosumers, targeting only at iPhone and wearable users?

Ah, but isn't 4k four times the resolution of 1080p, which the GH4 seamlessly handles at 30fps? How then, according to your "big sensor argument," can that same GH4 find itself incapable of processing 1080p at 4 times the 4k framerate? I would think that 1080p at 120fps should be possible on the GH4's new Venus engine. Please explain that.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 13:24 UTC

Interesting how Panasonic felt compelled to put 120fps (at 720p) and even 240fps (at 480p) in this wearable while the fastest speed they bestowed upon their "high end" GH4 is 96fps (at 1080p). Is smooth slow motion an unwanted feature among pros and prosumers, targeting only at iPhone and wearable users?

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2014 at 21:40 UTC as 19th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Francis Carver: "....in the US the camera body will cost $1699.99, and the video interface unit will be $1999.99."

No wonder then that nobody can take this company seriously any more.

Wow, USD $3,700 for the camera and interface monstrosity only -- just to shoot some mystery-grade 4K video using a smallish, square sensor?

Suddenly, our Down-Under friends with Blackmagic are the Honest Abes in the bottom-priced 4K video arena.

Keep in mind that "the GH4 also lacks 60p 4K output-compatible HDMI 2.0 output and HEVC/H.265 encoding, which is about 40 percent more efficient than current AVC/H.264 compression." Full article here: http://tinyurl.com/pecqwjc

With a simplistic camera device like iPhones having 120fps, I would have thought the GH4 would have offered the same for 1080p, but the max appears to be only 60fps. Not a big deal until you want to do smooth slow motion.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 03:28 UTC

I find it curious that the price has been released outside Japan but not inside Japan. I also wonder if Panasonic will finally allow those of us who live in Japan to buy a camera with menus switchable to English. (My GF-1 was purchased in Japan with Japanese only menus, but thankfully there was a firmware hack which fixed that.) I had been mulling an upgrade to a GX-7, but being a fan of both photography and video, the GH4 has quite nearly won my heart. But with the Yen weaker than the dollar now, it makes it less desirable to buy the GH4 in the US (plus shipping) to get the English menus.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2014 at 09:27 UTC as 9th comment
On article Integrating the Apple MacBook Air into a pro workflow (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

HeyItsJoel: How about that. A Mac vs. Windows debate in a Photography forum.

I bet somewhere in a Computer forum, they're debating Nikon vs. Canon.

Actually, Chromebooks were mentioned too.

But the reason why such debate exists in a "photographic forum" is because most Windows users are oblivious to the fact that "hardware specs" matter little to fans of Apple's OS X. That's why comments like "why not choose a Sony VAIO instead?" will fall on mostly deaf ears when spoken to someone who prefers Macs in their photographic workflow.

At the end of the day, I prefer to jump on my Mac to get some real work done with my photos, rather than worry about viruses or malware. If viruses or malware are not issues on your Windows machines, more power to you!

To quote Rodney King:

"Can't we all just... get along?"

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:41 UTC
On article Integrating the Apple MacBook Air into a pro workflow (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank C.: I wish DPR would spend more time reviewing cameras and lenses rather than worry about satisfying/plugging their sponsors, I miss the DPR of old with Phil Askey running the site... oh well I

What's laughable about some of your comments is that most of the people ripping the article are the Windows lovers! The pros who have OS X in their workflows have a few such gripes. There is certainly room for articles about a "photographic workflow" in addition to cameras and lenses.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:29 UTC
On article Integrating the Apple MacBook Air into a pro workflow (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Ma: I think it would have been more interesting if someone demonstrated how someone used a chromebook in a professional workflow and talked about working around limitations and barriers. You can do this with any computer. My i7 laptop with 256GB SSD + 750GB HDD (in place of the DVD drive) and 16GB ram costed less than 1/2 of this under powered macbook air and accessories.

Had to laugh at the comment by the feisty fellow who says Thunderbolt will die soon. Regardless of whether that comes to pass or not, have any of you hardcore Windows users examined how badly Microsoft's been doing? How about that Surface, eh?! And do you honestly think Chromebooks help Microsoft or Windows? And how about those Windows viruses that keep your wallet attached to anti-viral software companies?

As a Mac user since 1984, I certainly look forward to the day that the earth has once and for all ridden itself of Windows.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:25 UTC
On article Integrating the Apple MacBook Air into a pro workflow (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

More On: A Windows notebook, such as the Sony Vaio Z, is even better as it does all this, plus has a much richer range of software. I'm going to give this MacBook Air 8/10 and the Vaio 9/10.

The real problem with the Sony machines is the OS. Specs matter nothing to Mac users who greatly value the OS experience almost as much as weight, performance and battery life.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:17 UTC
On article Integrating the Apple MacBook Air into a pro workflow (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

mrmart: Does the macbook Air have the latest version of NSA software pre-installed?

No, you'll need Windoze for that.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:15 UTC
On article Integrating the Apple MacBook Air into a pro workflow (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

Scottelly: I have been using a 13" MacBook Air for almost 2 years now. I take it with me in my backpack everywhere I go. A few months ago I rode my mountain bike from Miami to North Carolina. I worked great on that trip, just as it does everywhere I go. I have no experience with other light notebook computers, but I have lots of experience with an old 2.33 Ghz dual core 17" MacBook Pro and various Apple desk top computers and Dell desk top and notebook computers running Windows. The little MacBook Air is by far the fastest computer I have ever used. I think that is mainly because of the fast solid-state hard drive. I have loved this little computer (with its long battery life) ever since I got it. It's getting old now, and I look forward to the day when I buy a new one. I'm hoping for a new retina display model with a new, super-efficient quad-core processor to come on the market in the next few months. Hopefully that would make processing the huge new files of newer cameras a little quicker.

Hardware specs little when pitting OS X to Windows.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:13 UTC
On article Scientists demonstrate 'paint-on' batteries (108 comments in total)

Practically speaking, most batteries last about 3 years. If this technology is no different, then I don't see the consumer merits, unless the end product becomes substantially cheaper to make it worthwhile to upgrade every 3 years. But even if that is true, such increase waste/refuse. And no matter how Eco-friendly the manufacturer claims it to be, no product is 100% recyclable.

I like the concept for non "pro" equipment, but it's far more practical if they can get 7 to 10 years (or more) from the battery. In this day and age, not all consumers want or have the monetary means to swap out hardware more frequently, myself included.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2012 at 02:12 UTC as 63rd comment

What's new here? I get banding on that lens with my GF-1 whenever I'm around fluorescent lighting:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/66071596@N00/5596989648/in/photostream

It drives me nuts. I too wish there was a fix.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2012 at 13:36 UTC as 21st comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

AndyML: A lot of you Apple haters need to step away from your ignorant perspectives and look at the facts.

Yes, other tablets have the same features, even more (SD, USB, etc). One thing that you cannot argue though: Apple is by far the most successful tablet maker. I know you're cringing, but this is strictly numbers.

Listen to their commercials. They are telling you why it doesn't have a USB port or SD slot. They are making a device for content consumption, not creation. This isn't brainwashing, it's simply them making a product for one purpose. That purpose isn't yours? Stick with your laptop or "niche" device.

They're adding features that improve upon their intent of the product. Everyone is using the screen, they improve that. Everyone is holding it, they make it light and thin.

Until you can argue that the majority of the consumer base would use the following features on a regular basis, then we'll talk: USB, SD slot, removable battery, apps not available in app store, etc.

It is not that "people don't care" about having an SD card slot, as some would contend. Nor is it that Apple doesn't care either. Apple does care. It cares about it's bottom line. By putting an SD card slot internal to the iPad, Apple could not charge $29 for their Camera Connection Kit. Apple has long nickeled-and-dimed their customers (myself included) for little-yet-important things like this. They get away with that by drawing the customer's attention away from the loss of certain "built-in" features by using "great and stunning design." And if AAPL stock serves as any indication, that strategy has worked and continues to work.

I say all of this not "liking" the present situation. I'd prefer to have an internal SD card slot. I'm just citing reasons why it doesn't have that. But that's not to say it will never have it. They'll obviously run out of "new feature" additions someday and be forced to add it. (That in combination with us beating them about it.)

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2012 at 23:02 UTC
On article Olympus raided over accounting scandal (70 comments in total)

As well all very well know, Olympus does have some very competitive cameras in the mirrorless market. Panasonic would be well served to buy up this company on the cheap so they can learn how to make decent in-camera JPEGs. (As a GF-1 owner, I know how JPEGs suck raw eggs. In-camera JPEG may not be important for pro users, but my wife hates to shoot RAW, so having stunning Olympus-style in-camera JPEGs would have the net effect of making some of the photos that exit my Panasonic cameras look better.) If Panasonic doesn't do something, in light of the amazing NEX-7, SONY will capture the mirrorless market before we know it. I have bought heavily into the GF-1 / µ4/3 world, but having been a Minolta SLR film camera user a decade ago, the NEX-7 compels me to put those old lenses to good use. If this news spells death for Olympus, it will be interesting to see how things in the compact mirrorless market pan out over the next year.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2011 at 21:29 UTC as 22nd comment | 5 replies
On article Panasonic DMC GF3 announced and previewed (1 comment in total)

The GF-1 is still the only Pro or Prosumer camera in the "GF" family. Princewolf is absolutely correct about the missing manual controls. A touch screen is no replacement for those. My brother fell flat out in love with my GF-1 when I visited him recently and he then searched for hours trying to find it for a reasonable price online, not wanting the GF2 or GF3 at all due to the silly touch screen. He wants manual controls even though he isn't even a pro photographer!

Compact is good, but it seems rather stupid to offer such a compact body in a kit with an enormous lens like the 14-42 shown above. Don't get me wrong, I am happy for the lens choices. My point is simply that "going smaller" with the body is nearly meaningless if you slap a fat lens on it. To keep your camera kit truly compact, you'd need to stick with the 14mm F2.5, or better the 20mm F1.7.

Panasonic should bring back the GF1 manual controls in the GF4, and focus more effort on bring us more FAST u4/3 lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2011 at 03:34 UTC as 7th comment
Total: 78, showing: 61 – 78
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