James Wages

James Wages

Lives in Japan Nissin City, Aichi-ken, Japan
Works as a Managerial
Joined on Feb 14, 2002

Comments

Total: 78, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »
On article Atomos launches Connect, a $79 capture card (94 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ignat Solovey: Looks like a re-badged generic Chinese device — but probably with slightly more polished firmware.
I recently purchased two similar no-name devices for $5 each on sale (delivery to Moscow took a month), and they work way better than one may expect — i.e. they just work as advertised, nothing unexpected whatsoever.

Link?

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2020 at 03:29 UTC
In reply to:

Horshack: Manfrotto's website says the warranty is only 2 years. Sony's rugged SD cards come with a 5 year warranty. Sandisk's warranty is lifetime.

You spoke only of the duration, not the content. What can you do during those warranty periods to the card and still get a free replacement? That’s the central question here.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2020 at 21:37 UTC
In reply to:

James Wages: Way too many legalists who advocate too many laws. Use tech to solve stray drone problems instead of dreaming up ways to punish our fellow man. Bad things happen. That’s life. But it doesn’t have to mean outrageous punishments. It’s the negative sprint of revenge and teaching people a lesson that results in the mind boggling laws and fines we have today. People calling for prison time are equally as merciless in light of the fact most people come out worse than they go in, at taxpayer expense.

It doesn’t matter what COULD have happened. It matters what did happen, which is nothing and therefore any fine should be reduced accordingly. I would say at most $50.

No doubt many will disagree with me. But keep in mind that with the same severity of judgment that you judge other people, you yourself will be judged someday. As imperfect people, we ought to always celebrate the spirit of the law over the letter, giving the nod to Mercy rather than absolute justice.

“Mercy“ is very much a part of most legal systems in the world insofar as the word itself is defined as “not receiving the punishment one deserves.“ As I said in my previous post, judges all the time make decisions on whether to administer mercy or the full punishment of the law.

I don’t even own a drone, so everything I have written is my own personal feeling on the matter that is not tied to any defense of drones or the laws that govern them. I simply advocate mercy, for one day I myself may be in a position to where I would need it, and if I have been a man to advocate only the harshest of punishments towards others, how then would I ever be the recipient of Mercy? Therein lies my point. Let us therefore strive to practice the spirit of the law over the letter.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2019 at 21:00 UTC
In reply to:

James Wages: Way too many legalists who advocate too many laws. Use tech to solve stray drone problems instead of dreaming up ways to punish our fellow man. Bad things happen. That’s life. But it doesn’t have to mean outrageous punishments. It’s the negative sprint of revenge and teaching people a lesson that results in the mind boggling laws and fines we have today. People calling for prison time are equally as merciless in light of the fact most people come out worse than they go in, at taxpayer expense.

It doesn’t matter what COULD have happened. It matters what did happen, which is nothing and therefore any fine should be reduced accordingly. I would say at most $50.

No doubt many will disagree with me. But keep in mind that with the same severity of judgment that you judge other people, you yourself will be judged someday. As imperfect people, we ought to always celebrate the spirit of the law over the letter, giving the nod to Mercy rather than absolute justice.

For a self-professed “critical thinker,“ you certainly don’t think that deeply. Judges make decisions all the time to show leniency regardless of what the law says. What I said is true and correct and practiced every day in the legal system. What actually happened in a given situation matters more than what “could have happened.“

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2019 at 04:01 UTC
In reply to:

James Wages: Way too many legalists who advocate too many laws. Use tech to solve stray drone problems instead of dreaming up ways to punish our fellow man. Bad things happen. That’s life. But it doesn’t have to mean outrageous punishments. It’s the negative sprint of revenge and teaching people a lesson that results in the mind boggling laws and fines we have today. People calling for prison time are equally as merciless in light of the fact most people come out worse than they go in, at taxpayer expense.

It doesn’t matter what COULD have happened. It matters what did happen, which is nothing and therefore any fine should be reduced accordingly. I would say at most $50.

No doubt many will disagree with me. But keep in mind that with the same severity of judgment that you judge other people, you yourself will be judged someday. As imperfect people, we ought to always celebrate the spirit of the law over the letter, giving the nod to Mercy rather than absolute justice.

Most of you legalists are quick to administer harsh judgment on others, forgetting that you yourselves are not 100% perfect and one day you yourself my face judgment. It’s easy to wish harsh punishment on someone according to the letter of the law. But it’s much more difficult to do the right thing and consider when an exception to that rule should exist and mercy should be extended. In light of the fact nothing happened, I refuse to go down the “holier than thou“ path that mercilessly condemns this man to a fine of half his annual salary or even to condemn him to prison, which we all know makes most people worse after they get out before they went in.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2019 at 23:20 UTC
In reply to:

James Wages: Way too many legalists who advocate too many laws. Use tech to solve stray drone problems instead of dreaming up ways to punish our fellow man. Bad things happen. That’s life. But it doesn’t have to mean outrageous punishments. It’s the negative sprint of revenge and teaching people a lesson that results in the mind boggling laws and fines we have today. People calling for prison time are equally as merciless in light of the fact most people come out worse than they go in, at taxpayer expense.

It doesn’t matter what COULD have happened. It matters what did happen, which is nothing and therefore any fine should be reduced accordingly. I would say at most $50.

No doubt many will disagree with me. But keep in mind that with the same severity of judgment that you judge other people, you yourself will be judged someday. As imperfect people, we ought to always celebrate the spirit of the law over the letter, giving the nod to Mercy rather than absolute justice.

Both of you gentlemen, and the eight or nine people who clicked Like on your posts, only proves my point about the defense of legalism in this forum. You also showed no mercy toward the individual who was fined an outrageous $20,000, which also proves my point about the lack of sympathy and mercy among us in this forum. And one of you actually tried to lambaste me for having a heart of mercy by wrongly suggesting I would be merciless if my family had been flying into that airport that day. I assure you, I would not have been merciless nor upset because nothing bad happened, which was my point.

Again, both of you missed my point by miles, as did all of those who clicked Like on both of your posts. Everything needs to be done on a case by case basis ensuring punishments are given out not by the letter of the law in accordance with the spirit of the law and human decency.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2019 at 23:20 UTC

Way too many legalists who advocate too many laws. Use tech to solve stray drone problems instead of dreaming up ways to punish our fellow man. Bad things happen. That’s life. But it doesn’t have to mean outrageous punishments. It’s the negative sprint of revenge and teaching people a lesson that results in the mind boggling laws and fines we have today. People calling for prison time are equally as merciless in light of the fact most people come out worse than they go in, at taxpayer expense.

It doesn’t matter what COULD have happened. It matters what did happen, which is nothing and therefore any fine should be reduced accordingly. I would say at most $50.

No doubt many will disagree with me. But keep in mind that with the same severity of judgment that you judge other people, you yourself will be judged someday. As imperfect people, we ought to always celebrate the spirit of the law over the letter, giving the nod to Mercy rather than absolute justice.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2019 at 03:41 UTC as 11th comment | 10 replies
On article This Adobe quiz reveals what creative type you are (179 comments in total)

It fails to detect creative types who hate subscriptions. Hmmm...

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2019 at 23:17 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

James Wages: Sigma needs new leadership. They’re a band of bozis for continuing to ignore the native u4:3 lens market. Give my GH5 a native version of the 18-35, for crying out loud. If I can make the 18-35 work with a Metabones adapter, they can surely build all that goodness into a single, smaller native lens!

“There’s not enough this, there’s not enough that...“ All these replies to my post are excuses that praise the status quo of things and do nothing to improve the lineup of lenses available for micro 4/3 cameras. It’s time to Think Different.

There is still life in the micro 4/3 platform and to encourage more people to use it and keep using it, we need more lenses. And we don’t need slow lenses either. The micro 4/3 system needs very fast lenses that give us bokeh rivaling full frame sensor cameras. It can be done and earn profits for the lensmakers too. Where there’s a will, there’s always away. I think it should be done if not but just to defy the naysayers!

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2019 at 22:54 UTC

Sigma needs new leadership. They’re a band of bozis for continuing to ignore the native u4:3 lens market. Give my GH5 a native version of the 18-35, for crying out loud. If I can make the 18-35 work with a Metabones adapter, they can surely build all that goodness into a single, smaller native lens!

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2019 at 04:27 UTC as 124th comment | 6 replies
On article Nikon Z7 Review (4477 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anulu: A7R3 gave 90pp from DPR, what has:
vastly better AF and tracking
much more native lenses,
3rd party native lenses,
two card slot,
bigger buffer,
Eye-AF,
pixel-shift,
faster fps without AE lock,
much better batterylife,
doesn't banding,
has 2 more command dials,
cheaper.

That's all is only 1point difference, this is just ridiculous DPR :D

Nikon fan, Bob J., gives the Z7 a 99 with Dionne Warwick cranked up in the background belting out “Solid Gold,“ while the rest of us are out shooting feature film after feature film on a Panasonic GH5. At the end of the day, a version 1 product is just that. It’s the same no matter who you are. It’s the same for Canon. Future models should be better, but I’m not holding my breath.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2018 at 00:04 UTC
On article iPhone XS / XS Max sample gallery updated (152 comments in total)

The girl in the horizontally striped shirt has to be the worst. Look at the front middle area of her shirt. The stripes are all blurred out and that one, strange, circular section! I see so many people talking about how great the blur effect is and how smart the AI is. I’m sorry, but it simply is not!

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2018 at 22:52 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies

Pretty cool...

https://vimeo.com/231924384

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2018 at 04:32 UTC as 5th comment

Yet another SD card targeted at the European market primarily? What the heck? As if the rest of the world is too poor to afford it? Europeans are the ones responsible that silly tax which sadly causes most cameras manufacturers to limit their cameras’ continuous video shooting to 30 minutes! Also, as I said in a separate post under the Sony TOUGH card announcement, all SD cards should be made this robust. And I contend that all SD cards should eliminate that fault prone locking mechanism which is the Achilles heel of the entire SD card design.

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2018 at 00:14 UTC as 5th comment | 6 replies
On article Sony launches new line of rugged SD memory cards (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

James Wages: Sorry but this is how robust every SD card should be! Also, why the launch in Europe? Is the rest of the world that poor?

Europe is “blessed“ with that stupid tax which restricts most of our videos to 30 minutes. Again, it makes no sense for a Japanese company like Sony exclusively start sales in Europe.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2018 at 11:00 UTC
On article Sony launches new line of rugged SD memory cards (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

James Wages: Sorry but this is how robust every SD card should be! Also, why the launch in Europe? Is the rest of the world that poor?

Understood about America, but what about Japan where I live and where Sony is headquartered? Makes no sense to have an exclusive European launch.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2018 at 08:42 UTC
On article Sony launches new line of rugged SD memory cards (338 comments in total)

Sorry but this is how robust every SD card should be! Also, why the launch in Europe? Is the rest of the world that poor?

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2018 at 23:37 UTC as 46th comment | 6 replies

I use a 180degree shutter on my GH5 for natural motion blur and often let Aperture float (rather than let ISO float) to ensure proper exposure. The problem is that when I pan around outdoors, the aperture changes are rather abrupt in terms of how the light level suddenly changes, much more so than if I fixed aperture and allowed shutter speed to float. So I find myself spending more time in post trying to make those aperture/light changes look smoother. Locking aperture and going full manual isn’t really a solution because highlights will blow out or dark areas will become too dark while panning outdoors. Ideas?

Link | Posted on May 28, 2018 at 06:41 UTC as 42nd comment | 1 reply

The worst thing about this article is actually not the article itself but the comments beneath it. This is nothing new, sadly. There are so many people here on DPreview that bash articles simply because they offer diversity of thought or because the article did not personally suit their fancy. There once was a time when most people could skip over articles that did not interest them and then actually read the articles that interested them, all without endlessly complaining about articles they didn’t like. So I will take time now to break from the majority and personally thank the content creators at DPReview. I have enjoyed your site for many years and continue to enjoy it. Keep up the good work.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2018 at 00:02 UTC as 45th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

James Wages: Depth-to-Defocus (DtD) is marketing hype trickery for those of us who use the GH5 and know that Olympus PRO lenses, which are sadly incompatible with DtD, are superior to Panasonic’s lenses, by and large. Only Panasonic lenses are currently compatible with DtD, which is limiting and ridiculous. Hence the strong demand among GH5 users for phase detect AF that works with any lens. If Panasonic wants us, valued users who keep their business alive, to support them and their efforts to improve AF, Panasonic should freely DtD technical details to any u4:3 lens maker so most lenses can become compatible with it.

There are actually an abundance of small and light lenses for the micro 4/3 system. The caveat is that they all are slow lenses. Exception to that rule is the Panasonic 20mm F1.7, which I actually use quite often. But to get a level of background blur that rivals a full frame camera, you really need F1.2 or faster in a micro 4/3 lens. And when talk about those, they are few and far between.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2018 at 04:48 UTC
Total: 78, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »