jadot

jadot

Lives in United Kingdom Surrey, United Kingdom
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at http://jlphotography.co.uk
Joined on Aug 27, 2010
About me:

Professional Photographer - Weddings mostly, Portraits of real people are high on the list.

Comments

Total: 637, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

NJOceanView: I saw the headline and thought this is old news. So I really appreciate your providing the context up front, and then giving us far better background into this venture than frankly any of their own internal marketing pieces provided. I initially thought I would never trust a start-up when my SanDisk cards have been so reliable for over 21 years of me shooting digital. But the team here make a compelling argument for considering them -- at least for one of the two card slots. Thanks for digging deeper.

Ha! I just had a look - that’s an awesome bit of kit! It made me remember that actually my first digital camera must have been a point and shoot probably around 2000 or 2001 I suppose. I think it was a Canon Ixus something or other. I left it in a taxi one evening and that was the end of that.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2018 at 10:40 UTC
In reply to:

NJOceanView: I saw the headline and thought this is old news. So I really appreciate your providing the context up front, and then giving us far better background into this venture than frankly any of their own internal marketing pieces provided. I initially thought I would never trust a start-up when my SanDisk cards have been so reliable for over 21 years of me shooting digital. But the team here make a compelling argument for considering them -- at least for one of the two card slots. Thanks for digging deeper.

Wow, I didn’t get my first digital camera until around 2002 I think. I Remember thinking that I was fairly quick off the mark. What was around 21 years ago in 1997? I’m not that clued up on 90’s digital cameras...

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 22:02 UTC

Looks like a lot of people judging Mr Ahad are the kind of people who think that this is OK, so for balance I'm saying it's not OK.
Not because a designated 'professional' deserves to get the picture over anyone else, but because I think that re-enacting this kind of shot or pose and pretending that it's authentic is lazy and disturbing, and possibly exploitative. It doesn't tell us anything about anything other than a different coloured person in a country far far away does something exotically different in his every day life that you might not expect to see in your day to day life back home, and how quaint that is. It's suggestive, at best.
Shooting models and directing them for say, a paid editorial shoot (yes, the model gets paid too) is an entirely different proposal.
Passing something as authentic real life travel documentary capture when you know fully well it aint is unethical and exploitative on so many levels regardless if the model was willing or paid or not.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 09:52 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

KubeKube: We've come a long way, portable flash for only $1,000.

Some weird maths here...60%? try 40.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 09:24 UTC

Finally. I can get rid of all of my hanging files where I keep my negatives.
Thank you Samsung.

Link | Posted on Feb 20, 2018 at 18:44 UTC as 28th comment

Sorry, I had an original Neo (it was £300 at the time) - I sold it (for a lot less than I paid for it) nearly straight away and bought a Neweer light panel which was ~ £40, much more powerful, with temperature control and a handy little remote control, along with slide in diffusers too.

The NEO had nowhere near as much power and ran off AA's which burned down very quickly.

It was a nice looking light, but who cares? Way over-priced, and underpowered - it's that simple.

i guess the '2' might be better, but it's nothing to carry a strobe and a cheap light panel and still have enough left over for a decent bottle of single Malt or two.

I just don't get it. I guess Jason Lanier does a very good job of marketing them for Rotolight, otherwise who's buying them?

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2018 at 15:50 UTC as 5th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Peter Bendheim: To all the people complaining about violence, showcasing death, murder, horrific murders, wars, blah, blah...

In case you didn't know, this is the World PRESS Photo Awards. Press - as in newspapers. Newspapers, as in those fold up readables you can buy every day to see what is happening in the world. And unfortunately, as I'm sure you would know, there are a lot of unpleasant wars, bombs, school shootings, protests, regime changes etc going on. And every day, photographers risk their lives covering this stuff so that we know what's going on around us because we don't live in caves. So this award is for them, no other genre, no other field of photography - just that brave corps of hardworking photojournalists.

And if you don't like this stuff, or don't see the merit of news reporting - then the Pets section is on the passage to your left, and the Pretty Flowers portfolios to your right. And yes, if the world was a better kinder place, it might be different, but it sadly isn't.

I understand that but my point remains: You don't know the name of the journalist, the reputable media outlet, the war torn country, or any facts at all, other than the fact that you recall seeing an interview back in the day. Without any of the above, you writing it here is indeed hearsay, and it's indicative of the problem that we're talking about. This is where photography comes in.

I could read somewhere that something bad is happening somewhere in the world, but without context, supporting photography, or facts, there is no way of knowing whether or not there is anything to know!

Here's an example:
It's pretty clear that the Tsunami that struck Indonesia, Thailand, and other countries in 2004 happened, because it was recorded. We all saw it, and it was given horrifying context.
Someone I know died on that boxing day in Thailand.

Which one of those statements is fact?

I can tell you they both are all I like, but what if I'm lying?

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 18:17 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1: What you need to know (227 comments in total)
In reply to:

NickyB66: Will wait for the XT-3, maybe the XT-2 if it comes down in price.

Maybe they'll take video out of the X-T3 altogether... This could make more sense than it might seem. They could improve battery life and lower the cost at the same time. All they'd have to do (sic) is improve the basic photography features - bring down low light noise, bang in a bit of IBIS, take a refined approach to manual control points, faster AF (the T2 is no slouch already) and upgrade the EVF. Use the resources set aside for video to really nail down the stills.

They wouldn't need to fix the 4K limit in the T3 because if you want video you can now buy the H1.

I'd buy that T3 in a heartbeat.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 15:29 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1: What you need to know (227 comments in total)
In reply to:

NickyB66: Will wait for the XT-3, maybe the XT-2 if it comes down in price.

Why would the T2 come down in price? I mean - that would be great, but the H1 isn't to replace the T series cameras. Put both cameras next to each other at the same price and I'd buy the T2 over the H1 for my kind of shooting.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 15:06 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1: What you need to know (227 comments in total)
In reply to:

migus: "I really wish they'd make their bodies much larger as I find them too small so won't buy any of them unfortunately" => -1 ;-)

However great, the new high end bodies launched recently --Fuji's XH1 and the m43 GH5S-- are growing large and bulky, exceeding an A7 with a small prime... With ergonomy and features they (XH1 and GH5S) are also adding a lot of bulk around their respective sensors - serving perhaps as heatsink for video and grip :-)

Personally i deplore this 'bodybuilding' trend for the smaller sensors. Perhaps it's OK for their market niches, but straying too far away from the mainstream that wants CONVENIENCE/portability and IQ - the smallest compact systems built around the largest possible sensors (eg., a5100).

Fuji make smaller cameras that will blow away the a5100. Just sayin'

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 15:04 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1: What you need to know (227 comments in total)

Personally, The H1 doesn't beat the T2. I don't see it as 'above the T series, rather a new product for different needs (i.e video).

Don't get carried away - the X-T2 has some advantages over the H1 and is still pretty much perfect for me (and no doubt others) who just want to continue shooting stills. Yes - I can see the advantage of IBIS - I'm all up for it, but I don't have any real problem with the X-T2 in low light, and I can't see the light getting any lower just because IBIS is now available.

So when the T3 is released will that then be 'above' the H1? No. Just a different camera for different use case scenarios. And what does this mean for the X-Pro? I mean what's the point in an X-Pro 3?

The point is that it's a better camera for some photographers. The reason that I switched to Fuji years ago was because they were suddenly making photographer-centric cameras. That hasn't changed.

Bring on the T3.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 15:00 UTC as 41st comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Peter Bendheim: To all the people complaining about violence, showcasing death, murder, horrific murders, wars, blah, blah...

In case you didn't know, this is the World PRESS Photo Awards. Press - as in newspapers. Newspapers, as in those fold up readables you can buy every day to see what is happening in the world. And unfortunately, as I'm sure you would know, there are a lot of unpleasant wars, bombs, school shootings, protests, regime changes etc going on. And every day, photographers risk their lives covering this stuff so that we know what's going on around us because we don't live in caves. So this award is for them, no other genre, no other field of photography - just that brave corps of hardworking photojournalists.

And if you don't like this stuff, or don't see the merit of news reporting - then the Pets section is on the passage to your left, and the Pretty Flowers portfolios to your right. And yes, if the world was a better kinder place, it might be different, but it sadly isn't.

The point is, your unnamed photojournalist's recounting of a horrific scene is more pointless and sensationalist than the fact of actually seeing the evidence reported by a photograph or similar.

There's nothing worse than telling someone "Well, you won't believe the things *I've* seen".

No offence, but what you did was one step removed from that. You basically said "I knew a guy who knew a guy who saw something". It's not your fault - we all have to trust sources at some point because we don't have the opportunity to experience everything first hand, but in the case of exploiting situations that are so horrific, you have to be more than fairly certain that the reporting is backed up by evidence and facts.

No spin. No ego. No machoism.

It's not that I don't believe him, or that you heard him say it. It's that if something like that happens, it brings with it a demand for heavy judgements about humanity that can't be simply taken as read (or heard).

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 11:25 UTC
In reply to:

Peter Bendheim: To all the people complaining about violence, showcasing death, murder, horrific murders, wars, blah, blah...

In case you didn't know, this is the World PRESS Photo Awards. Press - as in newspapers. Newspapers, as in those fold up readables you can buy every day to see what is happening in the world. And unfortunately, as I'm sure you would know, there are a lot of unpleasant wars, bombs, school shootings, protests, regime changes etc going on. And every day, photographers risk their lives covering this stuff so that we know what's going on around us because we don't live in caves. So this award is for them, no other genre, no other field of photography - just that brave corps of hardworking photojournalists.

And if you don't like this stuff, or don't see the merit of news reporting - then the Pets section is on the passage to your left, and the Pretty Flowers portfolios to your right. And yes, if the world was a better kinder place, it might be different, but it sadly isn't.

The problem with that particular story is that there is no source evidence that this happened which makes it hearsay, and sensationalist hearsay at that. This is where responsible journalism can help: If there was a genuine article or picture of this football game happening then there would be truth to the story which goes beyond "something really terrible happens all the time". It's pretty extreme, and perhaps unpalatable, but it's more likely to be indisputable as most genuine evidence is.
I'm not saying that I want to see such a picture, but what I want is irrelevant. If it happens there should be some way of reporting that. The delivery of the 'story' could well be disputed or questioned as some news agencies obviously have a private agenda, but the photographer's job is to supply the source material. Whether you choose to be shocked by it or not is irrelevant, if it's true.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 11:15 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1 First Impressions Review (723 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Should this be what a Nikon mirrorless is like?

It’s a mirrorless camera, so you can assume that a Nikon mirrorless camera will have similarities, yes.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2018 at 08:23 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1 First Impressions Review (723 comments in total)
In reply to:

tinternaut: The camera the X-T2 should have been?

No.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2018 at 20:20 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1 First Impressions Review (723 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kaonashi: This is somehow a confusing design to put it mildly (for Fuji fandom). A bigger body yet battery still the same (small). In Fuji world ergonomics was king (despite not having any decent grip) - the grip is there now but it is accompanied by a strange swap of the compensation dial with a top lcd (who asked for that?). This is a video oriented camera yet limited to 15 min recording unless used with additional battery grip. And so on and so forth. I am not a Fuji user but could always appreciate the effort they made. Not so much with this camera - some decisions seem not so well thought through. The body size is close to an dslr now, yet the usual benefits, apart from the grip, didn't follow. Strange.

The camera has been rumoured for some time and yes, it appears that the compensation dial ommition is due to the video emphasis of the hybrid camera. (A compensation dial is fairly cumbersome when shooting video, yet a shoulder display could be useful).
Don't see this as an X-T2 replacement - there will no doubt be an X-T3 before the end of this year. This H1 is for a particular kind of user and that might not be you.

For me, personally, the H1 isn't relevant so I won't be getting one. But I will most likely buy an X-T3 if/when that's released because that line of camera shoots the way I do.
Equally, I never needed an X-Pro because that's not the right camera for me either. So I didn't buy one.
If I start needing to shoot video beyond the X-T2's capability (which is actually enough for me) then I might look at the H1 because I have X-Mount lenses, but other than that the Panasonic would make more sense for people who want to shoot video at that level.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2018 at 11:24 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-H1 First Impressions Review (723 comments in total)
In reply to:

eno2: It looks like a nice camera, to bad Fuji isn't open in releasing a Bayer sensor version of it. :(

Why's that?

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2018 at 09:17 UTC
In reply to:

jadot: heart wrenching powerful photographs. I'm in awe of these photographers, capable of capturing real stories from unique perspectives. To me it looks like reportage photography at it's best.

[As a side note, I think it should be mentioned that Wedding Photographers (my line of work) who profess to covering weddings in a 'reportage style' should re-asses what it is they think they're talking about].

It’s ok to not understand things.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2018 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

jadot: heart wrenching powerful photographs. I'm in awe of these photographers, capable of capturing real stories from unique perspectives. To me it looks like reportage photography at it's best.

[As a side note, I think it should be mentioned that Wedding Photographers (my line of work) who profess to covering weddings in a 'reportage style' should re-asses what it is they think they're talking about].

@yake - unaware of your background (why would I be?) but in wedding photography the term ‘reportage’ is overused as a way to dress up or market an approach to capturing a wedding in what is often a poor attempt at showing some sort of authority or credibility to the couples who might be (hopefully) mesmerised by such professionalism.
A ‘Reportage Style’ isn’t the problem per se - more that the “I’m a real photographer because I know the words” vibe is misleading and unnecessary anyway. A wedding is a series of all kinds of photographic approaches - it’s just as meaningless if I try to sell the idea that I’m going to capture a wedding in an editorial style or a traditional style or a fashion style to a couple, and it’s just a disengenuous and cynical approach to getting a booking that you’re scared of not getting had you just been honest about this stuff in the first place.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2018 at 20:36 UTC

heart wrenching powerful photographs. I'm in awe of these photographers, capable of capturing real stories from unique perspectives. To me it looks like reportage photography at it's best.

[As a side note, I think it should be mentioned that Wedding Photographers (my line of work) who profess to covering weddings in a 'reportage style' should re-asses what it is they think they're talking about].

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2018 at 18:00 UTC as 36th comment | 6 replies
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