jadot

jadot

Lives in United Kingdom Surrey, United Kingdom
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at alexanderleaman.com
Joined on Aug 27, 2010
About me:

Professional Photographer - Weddings mostly, Portraits of real people are high on the list.

Comments

Total: 362, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

nikoreste: Is the sensor normal come or X trans?

I think it's normal come

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2017 at 09:23 UTC
In reply to:

tvstaff: From a marketing perspective this is nuts. Their primary clients are older established photogs who can afford their products. If this was purly altruistic then they should have picked a kid based on their work without them knowing. Mixed message to those who "are" your clients!!!!

One might suggest that if their older, more jaded, and bitter clients are producing good work it's harder for a less established younger generation to stand out, so the age limit gives them that chance. Also, broncolor's strategy could well be to introduce more accessible kit in the future for a new generation of photographers to take advantage of. It might be marketing gold for all we know. I doubt it, but I wouldn't get so upset about other people's opportunities either way.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2017 at 10:39 UTC
In reply to:

shirazigs: I really don't know why most of DSLR Cameras don't have a good design, a good shape, a sense of innovation. They use same body and model as ten or twenty years ago. Do I like that? As an artist I really hate it. All of these companies should take a look at Hasselblad's cameras to see what's the meaning of product design. I have a question for you. Do you care about the design of your camera?

Design:
Ergonomically, yes.
Aesthetically, not important.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 09:56 UTC
In reply to:

endofoto: The reason for paying for medium format is mainly flash sync speed. It is 1/125 in this camera but it should be 1/800 like in Hasselblad. You can take better images with Nikon D810 with 1/320 sync speed on a shiny day. It may be written erroneously here but it is the most important property for medium format. If it is true its a great shame for Fuji.

endofoto - just get an ND filter if it's for a shiny day. Not ideal, but workable.
samhain - replace "type-o" with "typo" and you're there.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 09:54 UTC
In reply to:

paulfulper: They missed an opportunity , if they made this camera only 8MP if would go up to 2 million ISO and daylight pics would still look professional , large pixels is the future .
I think the best camera in the world is the Sony A7 SII because of that .

hahahhahahaaha.
Sony.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 09:49 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (381 comments in total)
In reply to:

jadot: I disagree that the [integrated] ISO dial is redundant. It is the one thing that I really didn't like about the X100T - I had to go into the menus to change ISO. Hardly something that could be done on the fly. I know it's not the perfect solution here, but it is a solution none the less.

Ok - you can set ISO on the XT10 command dial. Not on the XT1 or the XT2, and not on the X100T. On my Nikon cameras I used to use the rear command dial for changing ISO when I was in Aperture Priority Mode for example.

All of this is lovely, but I'm struggling to see what it's got to do with the X100 series?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 14:37 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (381 comments in total)
In reply to:

jadot: I disagree that the [integrated] ISO dial is redundant. It is the one thing that I really didn't like about the X100T - I had to go into the menus to change ISO. Hardly something that could be done on the fly. I know it's not the perfect solution here, but it is a solution none the less.

io_bg - Yes, I used to operate my old fashioned Nikons this way, but tell me again what this has got to do with the X100T?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 11:46 UTC
On article Feisty upstart: Hands-on with the Fujifilm X-T20 (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

jadot: Now do I keep my X-T1 (alongside my X-T2) or do I replace it with the T20?

Thanks for understanding the rhetorical nature of the question.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 11:44 UTC
On article Feisty upstart: Hands-on with the Fujifilm X-T20 (286 comments in total)

Now do I keep my X-T1 (alongside my X-T2) or do I replace it with the T20?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 10:21 UTC as 56th comment | 4 replies
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (381 comments in total)

I disagree that the [integrated] ISO dial is redundant. It is the one thing that I really didn't like about the X100T - I had to go into the menus to change ISO. Hardly something that could be done on the fly. I know it's not the perfect solution here, but it is a solution none the less.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 09:38 UTC as 67th comment | 7 replies
On article Readers' Choice Awards 2016: the winners (49 comments in total)

Nice to see the x-T2 up there. It's an incredible bit of kit.
It was between the X-T2 and going back to Nikon for me last Summer and I shot alongside the D750 head to head. The FUJI came out on top (for me).

The D500 looks like a better camera than the D750 for my purposes, but I had already refallen in love with the Fuji, but kudos to Nikon - the D500 looks like the one to beat overall for most users.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 17:19 UTC as 3rd comment

You could create an army of Bono clones with this tech...

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 12:13 UTC as 35th comment
In reply to:

Paul B Jones: Not really comfortable with this. In talking about photography I am slowly trying to move away from gun references, words like "target" and "shot". Not an evangelist about it, just really tired of guns, guns, guns.

I'm in, but "Taking the Shot" is hard to replace. "Cracking one off" doesn't come across too well, and neither does "Popping one off" etc.

That aside I try to call my "Shoots" "Sessions" instead. e.g. "Let's meet up next Tuesday for your Newborn Session".

Suggest "hitting the Shutter" to replace "taking the shot".
That's all I've got.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 13:01 UTC
In reply to:

quietrich: Some extremely muddled and woolly thinking; an apparently desperate attempt to create some commercial images around the double meaning of the verb 'shoot', and to appeal to the lowest instincts of the imaging market. As a photographer, I feel seriously let down both by the images themselves (equating photography with violence), and by the (at best) dubious motivations of the 'artist'. Nasty stuff.

quietrich - I agree.

"A gun 'shoots'...
A camera 'shoots'...
Wait a minute! They BOTH shoot!
It's like they do the SAME THING!"

No.
No it's not.

This isn't art - this is someone who hasn't learned that poorly conceived juxtaposition and clumsy context isn't always a good idea. In this case it's actually not cool at all. It's not punk, it's not rebellious, it's not a clever play on words. It's just crap.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:33 UTC

It's a shame, but it won't be long until Apple update the Apple Pencil to be able to use with the magic Trackpad.
AstroPad is great at what it does, but I'd suggest that the standalone app will be fine for most users. It's enough for me for the amount of times I use it. I won't be going down the subscription route for yet another app that I rarely use, but then I'm not a graphic artist, which is really what this is for.
It COULD have been for photographers, but with the subscription model it looks like they've just handed that back to Wacom.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2017 at 10:08 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

flashcactus: How disappointing. There's nothing dignified about another me- too mashup with an insulting "soundtrack". I had to mute the sound after 30 seconds and the images were, editing-wise, just another lash-up.
Surely the answer would have been to give the job to someone who knew what they were doing, like Stanley Kubrick or George Lucas or Steven Speilberg. They would have at least got some kind of a classic, and not this trash. Signed: Musician and photographer in advertising and film for the last 40 years.

I don't think Kubrick would have been available.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 09:57 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: That's a pretty cool video. Not what I expected, I thought Nikon would have something super lengthy and boring. On the other hand I'd like to see a longer version of this, with more of the achievements from the last century (especially since the 40's) shown. It's also interesting the video actually showed more of their other technology rather than cameras.

It's a shame the company won't be around for another 100 years if they continue the path they're on today :/

Nikon weren't a camera Manufacturer first - their primary business was optics in the beginning, & I'd say the film went some way to showcasing this. The Nikon brand was first used on a camera in the late 40's I think, & the first Nikon 1 (sic) was produced around the same time.

I'd say that industrial optics & medical optics are probably bigger business for Nikon, but on a digital camera forum this can be a little confusing!
Rather than worry about Nikon's expected direction, you might instead think of the technical advances in optics that Nikon brings to their relatively young Camera division.

Nikon's camera's as we know them, might well not be around in 100 yrs, but if they "continue the path they're on today" they might just be at the forefront of science & space imaging. Why do you think that making cameras is make or break for Nikon? If they stopped making cameras tomorrow, they would still have a business, as would Canon, as would Fujifilm, as would Sony, as would etc. etc

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 09:35 UTC
On article Meet two nomadic photographers who travel full-time (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

jadot: Look, I appreciate this, I really do.
But Just a couple of things.

Although they sold all of their possessions, and live out of a bag, and this money has and is probably still funding this adventure of a lifetime, it would be interesting to know how much their photography is contributing to the expense of dropping out like this. There's nothing in this film that explains how the lifestyle is funded - (it's not free to fly to Italy for a week of rain only to have to fly back there for a week of too much sun) so it essentially is a story of two backpackers detaching themselves from their original lifestyle and culture. A little like the people you meet in Thailand or India who have forgotten to go home because it's easier to be alive when you haven't got to deal with anything, or confront participating in the world.

Aware that I'm Probably off topic, I think it's probably good to note that the pictures, which take up perhaps 1% of the film, aren't particularly inspiring (to me) - standard highly developed travel photographs taken from typical vantage points (according to them).

Maybe I'm off the mark here, so don't take it personally. But I think it's relevant to know how important the photography is to maintaining this lifestyle. I guess my question is, when I see a marketing piece like this: "Are the pictures good because we like the idea of the lifestyle, the bags, the airports, the sacrifice etc. or do the pictures stand on their own? If so, then why the mini-doc with drone footage, quotable philosophising, and exciting music?"

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 12:11 UTC
On article Meet two nomadic photographers who travel full-time (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

jadot: Look, I appreciate this, I really do.
But Just a couple of things.

Although they sold all of their possessions, and live out of a bag, and this money has and is probably still funding this adventure of a lifetime, it would be interesting to know how much their photography is contributing to the expense of dropping out like this. There's nothing in this film that explains how the lifestyle is funded - (it's not free to fly to Italy for a week of rain only to have to fly back there for a week of too much sun) so it essentially is a story of two backpackers detaching themselves from their original lifestyle and culture. A little like the people you meet in Thailand or India who have forgotten to go home because it's easier to be alive when you haven't got to deal with anything, or confront participating in the world.

Sorry - I wish them all the very best, and I sometimes wish that I could freely travel without fear of consequence but it's all too easy to forget that opting out isn't a choice for most people. It's a privileged lifestyle that can give the illusion that if you just keep running you might never have to look at who you are, because 'travelling' is all about looking forward to the next destination, never rooted to the here and now.

Finding home and making meaningful connections with people and place can take years - a lifetime even. Contributing to culture and making a mark on community in large or small ways, without thanks, without reward, is tough. Fixing things that don't work, fixing family, building relationships, and finding ways to improve the ways that people work and live and do business together are all far more challenging than saying "This lifestyle doesn't work - I'm outta here!".

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 12:11 UTC
On article Meet two nomadic photographers who travel full-time (151 comments in total)

Look, I appreciate this, I really do.
But Just a couple of things.

Although they sold all of their possessions, and live out of a bag, and this money has and is probably still funding this adventure of a lifetime, it would be interesting to know how much their photography is contributing to the expense of dropping out like this. There's nothing in this film that explains how the lifestyle is funded - (it's not free to fly to Italy for a week of rain only to have to fly back there for a week of too much sun) so it essentially is a story of two backpackers detaching themselves from their original lifestyle and culture. A little like the people you meet in Thailand or India who have forgotten to go home because it's easier to be alive when you haven't got to deal with anything, or confront participating in the world.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 12:11 UTC as 60th comment | 6 replies
Total: 362, showing: 1 – 20
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