Jonathan F/2

Lives in United States United States
Joined on May 2, 2004

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Total: 331, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750 (1212 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Why so many Sony shooters salty regarding the D750? It's a solid camera and a proven workhorse. The A7III is also an awesome camera and I'm sure it'll be a very capable body as well. Both are good cameras depending on your specific needs and neither are really expensive unless you like buying everything new at top retail prices. Bargain deals can be had for both systems.

I use both. I actually prefer the OVF when shooting in extreme lighting conditions. On bright, sunny days, EVFs will clip highlights and are hard to view in extreme contrasty conditions. In low light, the Sony EVF becomes choppy as well with a drop in frame rate.

Saying that, for more controlled conditions I prefer EVFs in more neutral light conditions.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 16:38 UTC
On article Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750 (1212 comments in total)

Why so many Sony shooters salty regarding the D750? It's a solid camera and a proven workhorse. The A7III is also an awesome camera and I'm sure it'll be a very capable body as well. Both are good cameras depending on your specific needs and neither are really expensive unless you like buying everything new at top retail prices. Bargain deals can be had for both systems.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 04:13 UTC as 105th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Good job Sony, it took you almost 3 years to slightly edge out the D750! :D JK

I think what makes the A7 III more compelling is that it's probably the most well-rounded 24mp camera on the market. It's the total sum of it's parts that make this camera interesting.

As someone who uses both the Nikon D750 and A7 II, here's my 2 cents!

I prefer PDAF OVF shooting for action photography, mainly because it's easier to work in intense lighting without the EVF going wonky or underexposed to adjust to light changes. EVFs while amazing for many things, really suck for this type of shooting.

On the flip side, I vastly prefer the EVF for things like portrait shooting, mainly because the on-sensor PDAF is more accurate in gauging focus especially at faster apertures. I can get pinpoint focus even with 1.2 lenses, no problem! In this regards, DSLRs can't compare.

With the D750 versus A7 II, the D750 definitely has nicer colors SOOC and meters spot-on while handling complicated lighting and contrast. It's just easier to work with D750 raw files. With the A7 II, it definitely excels in base ISO acuity, great for portraits and street photography.

I have no bias towards either, since I use both accordingly to their strengths. ;-)

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 17:38 UTC

Is there a good way to open the A7 III raws? It doesn't seem like editing apps have been updated yet.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2018 at 17:58 UTC as 61st comment | 1 reply

Good job Sony, it took you almost 3 years to slightly edge out the D750! :D JK

I think what makes the A7 III more compelling is that it's probably the most well-rounded 24mp camera on the market. It's the total sum of it's parts that make this camera interesting.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2018 at 23:14 UTC as 23rd comment | 12 replies
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: I wish Sigma would focus on utilizing lighter weight material. Carrying a whole camera bag of Sigma glass is a major hinderance. As much as I like their 85mm and 135mm Art lenses, I had to pass on them due to weight. At most you can travel with one or two Art lenses, unless you like killing your back!

Yeah I read that part, but what I'm saying is if a photographer wants to add more Art lenses to their bag, they might choose otherwise due to the overall accumulated weight. Sigma loses out on potential sales. What's the point of having the best when you can't bring it anywhere?

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2018 at 06:39 UTC
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)

I wish Sigma would focus on utilizing lighter weight material. Carrying a whole camera bag of Sigma glass is a major hinderance. As much as I like their 85mm and 135mm Art lenses, I had to pass on them due to weight. At most you can travel with one or two Art lenses, unless you like killing your back!

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2018 at 05:21 UTC as 50th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: In real world shooting with the A7II and D750, the A7II creates sharper images at lower ISOs and vibrant cool colors, but spotty WB. On the other hand, the D750 is just rock solid with "trademark" Nikon warmth, and the ability to meter scenes much better with less blown highlights, though it doesn't have the same acuity the Sony can achieve at base 100 ISO. At high ISO, the Nikon definitely pulls away, while the Sony starts falling apart at 1600 ISO never matching the D750 in that range.

I'll be interested to see how the A7 III performs in real world usage over it's predecessor and the D750!

@SteveAnderson - As much as I like using the EVF for many types of shooting, OVFs have a very good advantage when shooting in high contrast scenes. On my A7 II, the EVF will get overly contrasty in bright/dark scenes, making it hard to gauge when shooting. Also I think the D750 skin tones are much better than the D800/D600 series and on par with the D3/D700 if not slightly better.

@RubberDials - I agree the buffer is a bit small, plus the 1/4000th max shutter and 1/200th flash sync are a bit of let down. Here's hoping the A7III kicks Nikon's butt into responding with a competitive camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2018 at 01:29 UTC

In real world shooting with the A7II and D750, the A7II creates sharper images at lower ISOs and vibrant cool colors, but spotty WB. On the other hand, the D750 is just rock solid with "trademark" Nikon warmth, and the ability to meter scenes much better with less blown highlights, though it doesn't have the same acuity the Sony can achieve at base 100 ISO. At high ISO, the Nikon definitely pulls away, while the Sony starts falling apart at 1600 ISO never matching the D750 in that range.

I'll be interested to see how the A7 III performs in real world usage over it's predecessor and the D750!

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2018 at 16:15 UTC as 106th comment | 7 replies

Impressive!

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2018 at 16:35 UTC as 63rd comment

The same facility was photographed and a story posted about it on DPReview.

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/5191315002/urban-explorations-of-russian-photographer-ralph-mirebs

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 20:27 UTC as 29th comment
On article Pro Services: Are they worth it? (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

armanius: So for Nikon and Sony, a customer can spend $25K in their stuff, and still not qualify to the premium services, simply because photography is not their profession. Bummer for "amateur" Nikon and Sony users.

On top of that, Nikon has several authorized service centers in the US that will fix your equipment under warranty. APS Repair and Precision Camera Repair just to name a few.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2018 at 19:52 UTC
On article Pro Services: Are they worth it? (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

armanius: So for Nikon and Sony, a customer can spend $25K in their stuff, and still not qualify to the premium services, simply because photography is not their profession. Bummer for "amateur" Nikon and Sony users.

Yes, doesn't matter how much you spend on camera gear if it doesn't put food on your table. Pro services are for working pros, not weekend warriors.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2018 at 18:40 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony a7 III (584 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Hmm, what are the chances Nikon releases a D750 replacement with the body of a D850 and the sensor of the D5 and price it to compete with the A7III? I might go for that instead!

Now that would be the true success to the D700!

The Camera Store did a quick preview on the A7III and they said it just barely beat out a D750 in regards to image performance. That's a camera that was released in 2014. I have no doubt Nikon can achieve better image performance with present technology.

Also Nikon already did the all-around camera back with the D700 back in 2008. Unfortunately Nikon got sidetracked since that camera, but I think they're back on track in regards to releasing the best in every price segment.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:17 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony a7 III (584 comments in total)

Hmm, what are the chances Nikon releases a D750 replacement with the body of a D850 and the sensor of the D5 and price it to compete with the A7III? I might go for that instead!

Now that would be the true success to the D700!

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 06:04 UTC as 43rd comment | 8 replies

Lenses are bigger nowadays to accommodate fast in-lens motors, better wide open performance and corner-to-corner sharpness. They can make them smaller, but something else will have to give. All glass nowadays are optical compromises.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2018 at 19:38 UTC as 28th comment
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with the new Tamron 70-210mm F4 VC (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: DXO rated the Nikon 70-200mm f4 VR as one of the sharpest telephoto zooms in Nikon's lens line-up. You're not losing out on sharpness and f/4 telephoto zooms are cheaper and generally lighter than 2.8 70-200mm lenses.

I think where these third party lenses benefit is from cross system use. It seems Tamron and Sigma are making it easier for their lenses to be used on Sony from CaNikon mount via AF adapters.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2018 at 17:55 UTC
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with the new Tamron 70-210mm F4 VC (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stefan Hundhammer: I wonder how it compares to the Nikon 70-200 f/4 - one of the sharpest Nikkor zooms.

You can't get much sharper than sharp!

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 23:24 UTC
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with the new Tamron 70-210mm F4 VC (76 comments in total)

DXO rated the Nikon 70-200mm f4 VR as one of the sharpest telephoto zooms in Nikon's lens line-up. You're not losing out on sharpness and f/4 telephoto zooms are cheaper and generally lighter than 2.8 70-200mm lenses.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 23:18 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Pass. I'd rather pay extra for a Nikon 105mm 1.4 G lens and get the Commlite ENF-E1 Pro adapter to put it on a Sony body in order to get IBIS.

@ozturert - The size and weight of the Sigma 105mm 1.4 Art is beyond practical. The Nikon 105mm 1.4 G is big as well, but more manageable.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 13:50 UTC
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