T3

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 1, 2003

Comments

Total: 4832, showing: 81 – 100
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In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

Another advantage of mirrorless, visualized. Focus coverage. FF DSLRs can only have focus points clustered in the center of the viewfinder:

https://cdn.photographylife.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Nikon-D5-vs-Canon-1D-X-Mark-II-Viewfinder.png

It's a limitation of using a separate PDAF focus module. Not the case with mirrorless:

https://www.alphashooters.com/wp-content/uploads/sony-a7iii-phase-detection-points.jpg

Even earlier generations of mirrorless were beating DSLR focus coverage:
https://i0.wp.com/thenewcamera.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/AF-screen-img.jpg?resize=648%2C226

Smarter focus tracking and lock-on across a broader area of the image frame has true real-world advantages:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVvQx0ngVkM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyaOjhx_mK0&t=22s

Once you go to full-coverage AF, it's hard to go back to the limited, narrow, central focus coverage of DSLRs, particularly on FF DSLRs. People accept it because it's all they know!

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 15:29 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

Think of it in the opposite direction. Imagine if EVF were the norm, and the first DSLR camera came out today. There are so many things people would lose going from EVF to OVF! People would say, "So let me get this straight. I can no longer see my exposure previewed, I get fewer AF points, those AF points are only clustered in the center of the VF, I lose my histogram, I lose focus peaking/magnification, I lose highlight/shadow clipping indicators in the VF, I lose film simulation, I get less information in the VF, I love face/eye AF and their focus boxes, I lose face recognition, I now get something called "mirror blackout" because a mirror now has to flip up and down, I now have to use "mirror lock up" for slower shutter speeds if I want to prevent "mirror vibration", and my camera is now a lot bulkier, etc. All for what? So that I can do one or two fewer battery changes during a day of shooting? So that I can now look at a grainy frosted piece of plastic viewing screen? Yuk! :p

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 15:17 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

"Looking at your list you seem to need many "crutches" to help you "see" a photo..."

Hahaha, I love the "crutch" argument. We've heard it used with virtually every technology that has come to photography: auto exposure, auto focus, image stabilization, matrix metering, faster frame rates, more focus points, etc. People like you lambasted all of these things as "crutches to help you get the photo." So what? People have always bought cameras that have capabilities that allow them to do photography more easily! People like conveniences that technology offers. Think of power windows in cars versus manual windows. You could argue, "What do power windows offer that can't be done without them?" Nothing. A manually cranked window will roll down your car's window just as effectively as power windows. But how many new cars are sold with manually cranked windows?

You can not prevent the onward progression of technology and features simply be dismissing them as "crutches." It's futile.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 15:03 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

@cbphoto123 - "what really are the benefits of mirrorless? Not the spec sheet ones, but in reality."

Reality? I can see my exposure previewed in the ViewFinder. I have a live histogram in the VF. I have focus peaking/magnification. I have AF coverage across nearly the entire VF. I have face/eye AF. I can switch my VF to film simulation mode. I prefer black-and-white simulation mode because it allows me to see the world more abstractly, allowing me to see lines, patterns, shapes better, which ultimately helps me compose better images. I no longer want to be without any of these capabilities. I have found all of these things to be tremendously valuable in real-world shooting. For example, I will never go back to a camera that doesn't have full frame focus coverage and face/eye AF in the viewfinder. It's that useful to me! I also look forward to a day when mechanical shutters are a thing of the past. Global electronic shutter (totally silent, super fast flash sync speed) is the future.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 09:29 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

"Canikon were already well established... with several decades of experience in building cameras, both enthusiast and high end professional."

The same can be said of Nokia, Blackberry, and Microsoft in the cell phone market. Then along came Apple with zero experience in the cell phone market and zero establishment in the cell phone market. But all of them were caught flatfooted with the paradigm shift brought on by the new generation of smartphones instigated and driven by Apple. So it just goes to show that being established in a prior generation of technology doesn't ensure you will automatically have success in a new generation of technology. Likewise, Canon and Nikon were "established" in an older segment of technology (DSLR), but they were caught flatfooted with this shift to newer technology (mirrorless) being instigated and driven by Sony. As I said before, past performance in one product segment does not ensure future performance in a new product segment. It's a new game.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 09:17 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

@@cbphoto123 - Let's be clear here. I am a Canon DSLR user who had tremendous hope for Canon's mirrorless system. But as I mentioned, hope ran into reality, and I soon found out that reality did not live up to what I had hoped for. Like you, I assumed that Canon would do much better because of their "several decades of experience in building cameras." But I am not married to Canon. I have not pledged my allegiance to Canon. I am a consumer who as the freedom to choose whatever I want. In the APS-C format, I ended up buying Samsung, Fuji, and Sony APS-C mirrorless cameras. And the reality is that all three of those brands produced better APS-C mirrorless cameras than Canon. That's why I think the whole "several decades of experience in building cameras" argument is just brand-religion hogwash. Take Samsung, for example. Their APS-C mirrorless cameras far exceeded what Canon was making-- even compared against Canon's latest APS-C cameras of today! It's too bad they didn't stick around!

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 08:59 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

@@cbphoto123 - "See how this logic of yours is flawed?... probably not."

My logic is based on what is actually being produced in the mirrorless segment. Sony APS-C mirrorless vs Canon APS-C mirrorless? Sony is producing better. As for Nikon mirrorless, do we really want to talk about the Nikon 1 debacle? It's basically a dead system now.

As for FF mirrorless, we can clearly see the significant outlay of product that Sony has produced. Nine FF mirrorless bodies, compared to zero from Canon and Nikon. Before year's end, they will most likely introduce their 10th FF mirrorless body, the A7S III, before Canon and Nikon introduce their *first* FF mirrorless body.

So I am basing my "logic" on what is actually being produced. Your logic is based on hope. You're also basing it on "several decades of experience in building cameras", but as I said that does not seem to have brought much to Canon/Nikon's existing mirrorless cameras. I had tremendous hope for EOS M as well. Then reality set in!

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 08:48 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

@cbphoto123 - Why don't we wait and see how this all plays out? Past performance in DSLR is not necessarily a predictor of future performance in mirrorless. Canon/Nikon's own mirrorless systems seem to indicate this. I was a strong advocate of EOS M when it first came out. But it severely underperformed, which is why I ended up getting a Sony APS-C mirrorless camera. And Canon's APS-C mirrorless still underperforms against Sony's APS-C mirrorless. It's simply not as good, and the system continues to be weaker than Sony's (and Fuji's) APS-C mirrorless system. So it's being overly optimistic to assume that Canon's FF mirrorless system will be miraculously different, especially when it's going up against a system that has had a head start of several years. And Nikon will also be facing the same issue.

"with several decades of experience in building cameras"

...which is fine and dandy but that hasn't helped them much with mirrorless. Nikon 1, for example, was a train wreck.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 08:38 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

@cbphoto123 - Just wait and see. When Canon/Nikon finally release their FF mirrorless bodies, most likely with a very limited selection of lenses, you'll hear plenty of people complaining, "Where are the lenses?" Then people like yourself will say, "Just adapt your DSLR lenses!" But like I said, that's already been offered for years now, by Canon/Nikon/Sony offering adapters for their DSLR lenses. That's simply not enough. People still mainly do want- and expect- native mirrorless lenses. Besides, remember that Canon EF lenses work just as well on Sony mirrorless bodies as they do on Canon mirrorless bodies. I use both Canon and Sony mirrorless, and have adapters for both. I don't have any first-hand experience adapting Nikon F lenses to Sony bodies, since I don't own any Nikon F lenses. But from what I've seen, F lenses on Sony mirrorless bodies perform close to F lenses on Nikon 1 bodies. Regardless, mirrorless users will still demand a strong native mirrorless lenses selection.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 07:31 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

@cbphoto123 - "Are you assuming that Canon will have a new mount that will not accept their own EF line-up (with an "native" adapter) along with EF mounts (native) made by Sigma, Zeiss, Tamron and others?"

We're already down this path. Canon's APS-C mirrorless cameras (EOS M) already do this via an adapter.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ssjBsj40Ukk/VjI5T2tLqII/AAAAAAAAMQw/nG6Tv5Zx1Uo/s1600/Canon-EOS-M.jpg

Nikon's 1 system did this with F-mount lenses too, with the Nikon FT-1 adapter.

http://www.luminescentphoto.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Odell_20120209_8060-480x319.jpg

But as nice as it is to be able to adapt DSLR lenses, most mirrorless users still overwhelmingly want to use native mirrorless lenses. It will not be enough to say, "You can adapt our large selection of DSLR lenses!" Because Canon, Nikon, and Sony have *already* been saying that for years. No, Canon and Nikon's mirrorless systems will ultimately be judged by their selection native mirrorless lens selection.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 07:21 UTC
In reply to:

anticipation_of: This camera is absolutely amazing and shows the promise of the mirrorless paradigm perhaps better than any other camera to date—especially when considered alongside its siblings, the A9 and A7RIII. Sony is absolutely on fire and it's clear that they're working hard at making great cameras, albeit there are still some growing pains in terms of user experience, build quality, and ergonomics.

However, I'm holding off for the time being. This is because I think it's still anybody's guess as far as which manufacturer is going to come out of this transition period with the best system. Camera technology continues to improve, and Canon and Nikon—both experienced players with a track record that includes strengths in all of Sony's weak areas—are soon to enter the fray.

I expect it will be another three years or so before the dust begins to settle and a clear winner starts to emerge. I don't know who it will be yet, but I'm waiting with great interest to find out.

In the end, I think all these brands will have "good" systems. However, system maturity (ie. how long a system has been around) is probably going to be the biggest factor that sets these systems apart. The longer a system has been around, the more bodies and lenses they will have built up in their system. And that means they will have more selection, not only for new items but also for used. A side benefit is that they'll also have more third-party products available for their system too. As of now, Sony has introduced 9 FF mirrorless bodies (A7, A7R, A7S, A7II, A7RII, A7SII, A9, A7RIII, A7III) and 24 FE lenses. Sigma has announced they will be making 9 FE lenses. Tamron, Tokina, Samyang/Rokinon are all now making autofocus FF lenses for Sony too. I can only imagine how much more built-up this system will be 3 years from now. These things need *time*, and time is definitely on Sony's side because they've had so much more *time* building up their system compared to Canon/Nikon.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2018 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

Richard in UK: Apparently this camera is a sponge, with no 'weather sealing' whatsoever (I haven't tested this but others have, so let's assume it to be true...).

So a camera that can't be used in the field unless the sun is shining, and which will suffer from the lack of professional support, is the 'best camera you can buy'? Believe me (a 25-year veteran of the business of selling pictures) - Sony are not even close.

Sony seem heavily invested in Amazon this year.....

@cbphoto123 - I seriously don't know what's going on with you or these other people who are constantly trolling. But for some people, I suspect people just get stuck in their own systems and develop a bunker mentality. I wish everyone could use and own more than one system with an open mind and develop a perspective based on extended *first-hand* experience (like a lot of reviewers and many users here have). Obviously, some people can't do that-- financially, emotionally, or mentally. I think these forums would be a lot better if people didn't have such a tribal, bunker mentality or such a limited perspective.

You also have to consider that the VAST majority of mirrorless shooters are former (or even current) DSLR shooters. So by that alone, that gives us a broader perspective. A lot of DSLR shooters have extremely limited experience beyond just their DSLRs. They may spend a very short time with a mirrorless camera, but that's about it. Not enough time to shed their biases.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 18:46 UTC
In reply to:

brownie314: Sure you can get it under $2000 if you have a Sony lens laying around your house. If not - you can't get a functioning camera for less than $2000

Welcome to the ILC (interchangeable lens camera) world. When we refer to a "camera", we are specifically just talking about the body alone. ILCs allow you to change lenses and can be bought without a lens. So the article and pricing specifically refer to the camera body.

It's like stereo speakers. I just bought a new set of speakers (Elac B5's), which are very highly rated and many reviewers say that they are "the best speakers you can buy for under $250." No one complains that this price doesn't include speaker wires, an amplifier, a reciever, etc. No one complains that these speakers are "non-functioning" without these other things.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 18:34 UTC
In reply to:

TWM PHOTO: I think everyone needs to calm down. Yes, this doesn’t mention a lens with the body, BUT for 200 more you can get the kit lens which is no slouch. I don’t know why people are complaining so much about lens cost either....canon and Nikon lenses are just expensive. Tamron just released a great alt for the 24-70 too. Stick to what you like, don’t be threatened by others preferences or buyer guides. Grow a brain, make decisions and be confident in them.

Geez, are people seriously complaining that the word "camera" doesn't refer to a camera *plus* lens? Has this ever come up before when DPreview refers to the price of any other interchangeable lens camera? I can understand if DPpreview had said that it's the best camera *kit* for under $2000, but I think most of us in the ILC world understand that "camera" refers specifically to the camera body.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 18:31 UTC

Good to see that they continue improving the camera. Kaizen.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 18:08 UTC as 15th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Richard in UK: Apparently this camera is a sponge, with no 'weather sealing' whatsoever (I haven't tested this but others have, so let's assume it to be true...).

So a camera that can't be used in the field unless the sun is shining, and which will suffer from the lack of professional support, is the 'best camera you can buy'? Believe me (a 25-year veteran of the business of selling pictures) - Sony are not even close.

Sony seem heavily invested in Amazon this year.....

@cbphoto123 - *sigh* No matter what, you're going to think negatively of anything associated with Sony. So be it. The rest of the world will move on without you. Canon, Sony, Fuji, Olympus, Samsung, I've owned and used them all.

https://ibb.co/iHjj1J

https://ibb.co/ge1E1J

I can sit around and dig up FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt) on all of them. But instead, I've used them and enjoy them. They *all* have their pros and cons. However, if all you ever want to do is obsess about the negatives or nitpick them to death, and blow these things out of proportion for the sake of internet arguments, then so be it. It's really quite petty, and I think most people here see that.

Getting back to the original point of this thread, the A7 III is plenty strong and resilient and capable enough to withstand shooting in a wide variety of conditions. You may not want to go swimming with it, but for most everything else it will be fine for probably 98% of shooters. If you are in the 2%, look elsewhere.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 18:03 UTC
In reply to:

Richard in UK: Apparently this camera is a sponge, with no 'weather sealing' whatsoever (I haven't tested this but others have, so let's assume it to be true...).

So a camera that can't be used in the field unless the sun is shining, and which will suffer from the lack of professional support, is the 'best camera you can buy'? Believe me (a 25-year veteran of the business of selling pictures) - Sony are not even close.

Sony seem heavily invested in Amazon this year.....

@cbphoto123 - No, it is the same. It's really about attacking change. It doesn't matter if we're talking about film vs digital, or horse-drawn carriages versus the automobile, there are always people who will attack any change to the status quo. And yes, I've lumped you in with a small group of attackers. I'm not implying that you are coordinating amongst yourselves, but I am implying that you are likely motivated by the same human emotions.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 15:38 UTC
In reply to:

Richard in UK: Apparently this camera is a sponge, with no 'weather sealing' whatsoever (I haven't tested this but others have, so let's assume it to be true...).

So a camera that can't be used in the field unless the sun is shining, and which will suffer from the lack of professional support, is the 'best camera you can buy'? Believe me (a 25-year veteran of the business of selling pictures) - Sony are not even close.

Sony seem heavily invested in Amazon this year.....

@cbphoto123 - Please grow up. Your degree of nitpicking is getting absurd.

Ultimately, your small cabal of Sony attackers are going to fail. People attacked Canon EOS in a similar manner in the early days of Canon EOS. But in the end, those vain attempts failed because they were more about attacking a threat to the status quo. Now it's happening all over again, but with Sony mirrorless. History is simply repeating itself. Canon just kept plowing ahead with innovation, with technology, with fast-spaced product iterations, and the rest is history. Now, it's Sony doing the same thing. And just like with Canon EOS, the attackers are coming out of the woodwork, throwing every little piece of FUD at them. I've seen it all before. Changes are afoot, and some people don't like it, so they lash out.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 15:21 UTC
In reply to:

Peter CS: Hate to be a spoil-sport here, but if you can afford these big and expensive lenses, wouldn't one be much better off getting a D750 with grip for an extra $1100 - over the adapter, with the D750 offering much better autofocus and better weather-sealing, not to mention being far better in balancing the lenses, especially with the grip on the camera. Camera weight and dimensions are of little consequence here...

@dgumshu - It's not really about YOU hearing it, because photographers are used to it. It's really about how it effects others around you. That's really what it comes down to. Other people, particularly non-photographers, can find DSLR noise to be annoying, distracting, and impolite, especially in environments when people expect quiet. And at the very least, it can draw attention to yourself when you might want to maintain a degree of stealth. Silent shooting may not ALWAYS be valuable, but there are certainly times when it definitely is valuable.

But lets flip it and ask ourselves how valuable mirror slap is? How valuable is that sound? From my experience, the only time it's valuable is when I'm shooting portraits so the subject/model knows I've taken the shot. But I don't need a physical mirror slapping to make that sound. I can just have any artificial sound to indicate that, such as an electronic recorded sound (like you have on a smart phone).

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 15:02 UTC
In reply to:

Richard in UK: Apparently this camera is a sponge, with no 'weather sealing' whatsoever (I haven't tested this but others have, so let's assume it to be true...).

So a camera that can't be used in the field unless the sun is shining, and which will suffer from the lack of professional support, is the 'best camera you can buy'? Believe me (a 25-year veteran of the business of selling pictures) - Sony are not even close.

Sony seem heavily invested in Amazon this year.....

@Magnar W - I totally agree. I've used Sony cameras as well as many others across a wide variety of conditions, and they all do just fine. People are just grasping at straws looking for ways to talk crap about certain brands that they feel threatened by. It's simply brand tribalism and insecurity that causes people to come on these forums and attack, attack, attack other brands. It's absurd. If people actually used these products for an extended period of time (as many reviewers have done!), they would find that most if not all of their attacks and criticisms either lack merit or are overblown.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2018 at 14:53 UTC
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