T3

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Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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Total: 3471, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

StevieF: When the mighty Nikon big beast reasserts itself and tramples over everyone in the mirrorless world I'm looking forward to a D5 fire sale. Possibly.

Fire sale? You mean Nikon will knock $1000 off the price of the D5, making it still $1000 more expensive than the list price of a Sony A9-- except that an A9 will probably be a lot cheaper by then?

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 01:53 UTC
In reply to:

T3: No more mechanical shutters. The future of cameras will be solid state electronic shutters. No mechanical mirrors, no mechanical shutters, no more phase detection modules that need calibration, etc. And I'm sure the manufacturers will welcome this too. After all, this is a big, costly headache for Nikon. Remember when Canon DSLRs had reflex mirror detachment issues? These are all mechanical issues that are costly. Fewer parts, fewer issues with those parts, fewer service issues, lower manufacturing costs.

@webber15 - LOL, when was the last time anyone had a sensor die? Do a google search of "camera sensor died" or "camera sensor dies." I found no reports or incidents of cameras sensors dying. Sensors just don't die. If it does happen, it certainly appears to be an extremely rare occurrence. Besides, you seem to forget that cameras with mechanical shutters have sensors too!

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 00:47 UTC

No more mechanical shutters. The future of cameras will be solid state electronic shutters. No mechanical mirrors, no mechanical shutters, no more phase detection modules that need calibration, etc. And I'm sure the manufacturers will welcome this too. After all, this is a big, costly headache for Nikon. Remember when Canon DSLRs had reflex mirror detachment issues? These are all mechanical issues that are costly. Fewer parts, fewer issues with those parts, fewer service issues, lower manufacturing costs.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 22:34 UTC as 91st comment | 13 replies
In reply to:

Donnie G: My guess is that Nikon will take a similar approach to new camera development as Canon. They will come up with an easy to use, quick focusing, touchscreen plus on-sensor phase detection combination that can be used with equal success throughout their camera product line, both mirrorless, and DSLR. Such a combination will make their APS-C compact mirrorless designs extremely attractive to a wide range of users while also turning their DSLRs into cameras with all of the advantages of pure mirrorless designs when used in live-view mode, just like the Canons. No need for a FF mirrorless body when your DSLR already gives you the same functionality. No worries about lens compatibility either. Very cost effective. Maximizes ROI. 😎

@Donnie G - It's not breaking news that ILC users generally prefer to use viewfinders. So your theory that DSLR manufacturers are going to pursue the growing mirrorless market by simply asking people to use the rear LCD for "mirrorless mode" simply is not a viable long-term option. It's also self-defeating for DSLRs because it indoctrinates more and more users into the advantages of shooting "mirrorless". Think about it: in "mirrorless" mode users get near edge-to-edge AF coverage, face detection AF, and being able to see the effects of exposure adjustments in real time. But in "DSLR mode"-- using the OVF-- all those capabilities go away. Eventually, more and more consumers are going to say, "Gee, why should I even bother with 'DSLR mode.' I prefer the features that mirrorless offers. I really like face AF and wide-area focus coverage. I like being able to see my exposure changes in real time. I should just get a real mirrorless camera."

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 22:17 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: My guess is that Nikon will take a similar approach to new camera development as Canon. They will come up with an easy to use, quick focusing, touchscreen plus on-sensor phase detection combination that can be used with equal success throughout their camera product line, both mirrorless, and DSLR. Such a combination will make their APS-C compact mirrorless designs extremely attractive to a wide range of users while also turning their DSLRs into cameras with all of the advantages of pure mirrorless designs when used in live-view mode, just like the Canons. No need for a FF mirrorless body when your DSLR already gives you the same functionality. No worries about lens compatibility either. Very cost effective. Maximizes ROI. 😎

@Donnie G - You and I both know that smartphones are a different animal. No one is going to argue that using a smartphone camera is a great ergonomic experience. It's really a factor of high convenience that has made smartphone photography explode. But in the ILC world, most people want to use a viewfinder. When you are investing in an ILC, you have a different expectation from a smartphone. With a smartphone camera, no one has the expectation that they are going to look through a viewfinder. So your argument that since smartphone users don't use a viewfinder, then DSLR users will be happy not using a viewfinder too is simply a bad argument. We all know that using a smartphone for a camera is a compromised experience, but one that we are fine to accept because of the convenience of having a camera in our pocket all the time that is built into our phone that we have all the time.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 15:23 UTC
In reply to:

panchorancho: Nikon is going to use Sony as toilet paper from here on out! Go Nikon!

Where are Nikon going to get their sensors from? Nikon is heavily dependent upon Sony for sensors. If Sony cut off Nikon from using Sony sensors, Nikon would have to use toilet paper for their sensors, lol. Their source for their Nikon 1 sensors, Aptina, got bought out by another company that wants to concentrate on other areas outside of the consumer camera market.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 13:49 UTC
In reply to:

BBQue: Is Nikon going to develop new lenses from scratch? Really? How long will that take? Can they catch up with Sony at this point? I doubt it....

@35mm Format - Adapting lenses is a band-aid solution. It's helpful, but people still really want dedicated mirrorless lenses. After all, Canon has been touting adaptability of Canon EF lenses to their EOS M cameras. And sure, some people do it with some lenses. But EOS M users are still yearning for more EF-M glass. No EOS M users are advocating "no lenses from scratch, there is EF-mount having already everything!"

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 13:46 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

yahoo2u: APSC sensor...fine.
Body only $2695 AUS...No.
There are plenty of APSC cameras on the market with same MP for way less with lenses attached and still way cheaper.
.....and here's the secret...they all have the ability to take nice images.

@Dan DeLion - But they are smart enough to hold high-income jobs that allow them to afford Leicas? Yeah, makes total sense. It's like saying that someone who buys a $10,000 Rolex isn't smart enough to look for a lower-priced watch.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 13:40 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: My guess is that Nikon will take a similar approach to new camera development as Canon. They will come up with an easy to use, quick focusing, touchscreen plus on-sensor phase detection combination that can be used with equal success throughout their camera product line, both mirrorless, and DSLR. Such a combination will make their APS-C compact mirrorless designs extremely attractive to a wide range of users while also turning their DSLRs into cameras with all of the advantages of pure mirrorless designs when used in live-view mode, just like the Canons. No need for a FF mirrorless body when your DSLR already gives you the same functionality. No worries about lens compatibility either. Very cost effective. Maximizes ROI. 😎

@Donnie G - You are one of the very few people who are advocating rear-view LCD use as a great experience, and as the savior of DSLR. It's not. It's a band-aid solution. Furthermore, as people see that Live View capability is so effective, they'll naturally want that capability in the viewfinder. And when they find that they can't have that experience in the viewfinder, they'll increasingly seek out cameras that offer that experience in the viewfinder-- which means true mirrorless cameras with EVF. So in the long run, it's ultimately a losing strategy. It's like Kodak Proshots. A band-aid half-assed solution.

And, no, I don't see a re-surgence of DSLR sales, as you seem to be expecting. I think you're one of the few lonely people who are advocating that. DSLR popularity ain't coming back just because of Live View! Using Live View on a DSLR just isn't a great experience.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 13:37 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: My guess is that Nikon will take a similar approach to new camera development as Canon. They will come up with an easy to use, quick focusing, touchscreen plus on-sensor phase detection combination that can be used with equal success throughout their camera product line, both mirrorless, and DSLR. Such a combination will make their APS-C compact mirrorless designs extremely attractive to a wide range of users while also turning their DSLRs into cameras with all of the advantages of pure mirrorless designs when used in live-view mode, just like the Canons. No need for a FF mirrorless body when your DSLR already gives you the same functionality. No worries about lens compatibility either. Very cost effective. Maximizes ROI. 😎

"OTOH, enthusiasts and pros expect to pay more for their DSLRs and happily continue to do so."

That's a big assumption. Let's see in a few years how many people will continue to want to pay more for their DSLRs.

"The DSLR is a highly adaptable design"

No, mirrorless is FAR more adaptable!

"once again it can keep pace against all comers now that Canon has shown everybody how to make live-view shooting as easy and enjoyable as using a mirrorless camera."

You're delusional. Live view shooting is not as enjoyable for most ILC shooters as using a viewfinder.

"All of the DSLR makers will follow this new path except for those who can't."

We'll see about that. And we'll see how DSLRs stand up to mirrorless five years from now.

More and more DSLR shooters are steadily being converted. Watch Jared Polin's "Real World Review" of the A9. Jared is a diehard Nikon DSLR shooter. But he's pretty darn pumped about the A9!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eBgzkPb01Q

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 06:10 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: The say, in very clear words, in the answer that they are going to continue to use DSLR as their top tier system. So, no FF mirrorless. That is easy to read.

They also say that a new thing is coming that is aimed at the smartphone generation. Something that will give them higher IQ in a package they like.

Now, that could be 1 inch, m43 or APS-C stuff. In theory.

In practice though, why introduce a new system to lure over the smartphone generation? Why not simply release a smart phone generation friendly 1 inch camera?

Therefore, that is what I am very sure they are going to do.

@RubberDials - I'd say most mirrorless users are former DSLR users. I'd also say that people generally like to invest in the future, not the past.

"None of this is relevant in any case because Nikon isn't working on a FF mirrorless camera - neither is Canon."

We'll see about that.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 05:07 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: My guess is that Nikon will take a similar approach to new camera development as Canon. They will come up with an easy to use, quick focusing, touchscreen plus on-sensor phase detection combination that can be used with equal success throughout their camera product line, both mirrorless, and DSLR. Such a combination will make their APS-C compact mirrorless designs extremely attractive to a wide range of users while also turning their DSLRs into cameras with all of the advantages of pure mirrorless designs when used in live-view mode, just like the Canons. No need for a FF mirrorless body when your DSLR already gives you the same functionality. No worries about lens compatibility either. Very cost effective. Maximizes ROI. 😎

Mirrorless cameras that are the exact same thickness as a DSLR, and that can only be used with mirrorless features if you are using the rear LCD is simply not a good long-term solution. It's a half-assed, short-term solution. These half-assed solutions that are driven by the desire to hold into legacy technology never work out so well. Kodak attempted the same thing. Kodak's Proshots service was a service that attempted to integrate digital scanning and film processing. Shoot film, and during the processing stage the film would be scanned to digital. It was their attempt at holding onto film in the digital age. But the service bombed, because users didn't want a half-assed digital solution. They preferred to go full digital. The same will ultimately happen with mirrorless. The next generation of users won't want a half-assed mirrorless product. They'll want to go full mirrorless.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 03:13 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: The say, in very clear words, in the answer that they are going to continue to use DSLR as their top tier system. So, no FF mirrorless. That is easy to read.

They also say that a new thing is coming that is aimed at the smartphone generation. Something that will give them higher IQ in a package they like.

Now, that could be 1 inch, m43 or APS-C stuff. In theory.

In practice though, why introduce a new system to lure over the smartphone generation? Why not simply release a smart phone generation friendly 1 inch camera?

Therefore, that is what I am very sure they are going to do.

@RubberDials - First of all, look up Osborne Effect.

Secondly, the "perceived status" of Nikon is not as strong as it used to be. Certainly not as strong in the younger generation. And Nikon is not as "impressive" as it once might have been. The "perceived status" of Nikon certainly didn't help the 1-series much.

Also, if Nikon comes to market in the near future with FF mirrorless, it still has to stand on its own merits-- both the body and the system. It'll be up against much more mature systems. Nikon doesn't get a pass just because of its name. Also, the name value of Canon, which is arguably stronger than Nikon's, certainly hasn't made the EOS M line very successful. On Amazon, the best-selling Canon mirrorless camera is the EOS M10 at #46, well behind many models of cameras from Sony, Panasonic, and Fuji. Do you really think that Nikon, which isn't as popular as Canon, is going to do any better based on its name? LOL. No.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 02:12 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

VBLondon: There's a reason every other manufacturer has given up trying to sell premium ILCs without a built-in EVF. When will Leica figure this out?

@HowaboutRAW - Hahaha, there's not a single camera viewfinder in the world that has a flush, non-recessed piece of glass on it. Every camera viewfinder in the world has a recessed piece of glass for a reason. Having a flush flat piece of glass means a greater chance of ambient-light reflections that hinders viewfinder viewing and lowers viewfinder contrast. That's why viewfinders have hoods, too. And your idea is also pretty unworkable for eyeglass users, because it would mean eyeglass lens would very likely come into contact with that flat piece of naked glass! Your idea of "a clear bit that would allow one to use an EVF built into the camera" is simply a non-starter.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 00:00 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: The say, in very clear words, in the answer that they are going to continue to use DSLR as their top tier system. So, no FF mirrorless. That is easy to read.

They also say that a new thing is coming that is aimed at the smartphone generation. Something that will give them higher IQ in a package they like.

Now, that could be 1 inch, m43 or APS-C stuff. In theory.

In practice though, why introduce a new system to lure over the smartphone generation? Why not simply release a smart phone generation friendly 1 inch camera?

Therefore, that is what I am very sure they are going to do.

@RubberDials - "This steadies nerves, gives potential switchers pause and rubs off on sales of currently available gear."

An early announcement of Nikon FF mirrorless has the potential of depressing Nikon FF DSLR sales, and maybe even Nikon APS-C DSLR sales too. That's very different from a new Mac Pro announcement because Mac Pros are already an existing line, and announcing the development of a new Mac Pro means that the line is still being supported. Announcing FF mirrorless development has the opposite effect, where Nikon DSLR users start wondering if they should start migrating away from Nikon DSLRs (by refraining from new Nikon DSLR purchases) because they anticipate mirrorless to be the future. So a Mac Pro announcement encourages people to stay with Mac Pro while a Nikon FF MILC announcement encourages people to hold off on new Nikon DSLR purchases.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 23:47 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: The say, in very clear words, in the answer that they are going to continue to use DSLR as their top tier system. So, no FF mirrorless. That is easy to read.

They also say that a new thing is coming that is aimed at the smartphone generation. Something that will give them higher IQ in a package they like.

Now, that could be 1 inch, m43 or APS-C stuff. In theory.

In practice though, why introduce a new system to lure over the smartphone generation? Why not simply release a smart phone generation friendly 1 inch camera?

Therefore, that is what I am very sure they are going to do.

"Why not simply release a smart phone generation friendly 1 inch camera?"

What do you think the Nikon 1-series is?!?

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 23:35 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: The say, in very clear words, in the answer that they are going to continue to use DSLR as their top tier system. So, no FF mirrorless. That is easy to read.

They also say that a new thing is coming that is aimed at the smartphone generation. Something that will give them higher IQ in a package they like.

Now, that could be 1 inch, m43 or APS-C stuff. In theory.

In practice though, why introduce a new system to lure over the smartphone generation? Why not simply release a smart phone generation friendly 1 inch camera?

Therefore, that is what I am very sure they are going to do.

"they are going to continue to use DSLR as their top tier system. So, no FF mirrorless"

...for now. When your top tier DSLR (the D5) maxes out at 12fps (using the OVF) and its focus points can only cover the central area of the viewfinder, with lots of dead space around it:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/nikon-d5/ZPR-nikon_d5-AFpointsFrame.jpg

...that really puts it at a disadvantage over the higher frame rate and full-frame focus coverage of mirrorless cameras. Not to mention that a D5 costs $2000 more than a top-tier mirrorless camera such as the A9, because DSLRs cost more to make, especially top-tier DSLRs. So in the long run, Nikon's top tier DSLRs are going to find it harder and harder to compete with rapidly-advancing mirrorless cameras when it comes to performance and price.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 23:28 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

VBLondon: There's a reason every other manufacturer has given up trying to sell premium ILCs without a built-in EVF. When will Leica figure this out?

@HowaboutRAW - It's pretty clear that Leica was going for a particular minimalistic aesthetic with the T-series body. The entire back of the camera is just a single sheet of glass. No buttons, no dials, no viewfinder window, just a clean, unbroken sheet of glass. It had nothing to do with them wanting a particular kind or size of EVF. It's really about attaining a minimalist design. Heck, with the TL2 they went even more minimalist by eliminating the built-in flash! It's a very Apple-esque design philosophy they are applying to the T-series. And why wouldn't they want to copy Apple's minimalist aesthetic? It's worked great for Apple and their premium brand!

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 23:11 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-A3 Review (238 comments in total)
In reply to:

WGVanDyck: Has DPR redefined the term "mirrorless"? Originally the term referred to a camera equipped with an electronic view-finder, as opposed to prisms or mirrors. Now, are we to understand that the term applies to any cameras not using a prism, mirror, or even an EVF? I don't see how the X-A3 could be called a "mirrorless" camera since it has no provision for a viewfinder; which would seem to be a prerequisite for the use of that term. Interestingly, I didn't see Fujifilm using the term on their X-A3 pages.

No, a term "mirrorless" is not dependent on EVF or OVF. It's any ILC where the light path has a straight shot to the image sensor without a reflex mirror in the way.

We all know that m4/3 is a "mirrorless" system. And Olympus's first m4/3 camera did not have a viewfinder.

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympusep1

The only "provision" for a viewfinder was a plain old fixed-field-of-view optical viewfinder that fit onto the hotshoe, not an EVF.

https://www.dpreview.com/files/p/articles/4833551011/images/whatsnew/vf4.jpeg

Nevertheless, that was still a "mirrorless" camera.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 23:06 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

VBLondon: There's a reason every other manufacturer has given up trying to sell premium ILCs without a built-in EVF. When will Leica figure this out?

@HowaboutRAW - I don't think your "tiny but excellent EVF" conspiracy theory holds any water. "Tiny" would mean an EVF with small (WxH) dimensions, and I highly doubt Leica would ever want to use something so small, regardless of how "excellent" it is. No one wants to look at a "tiny" viewfinder image, no matter how "excellent" it is.

Most likely, they went with an external EVF simply because it makes the solid-block TL easier to manufacture from a single block of aluminum, and the lack of EVF emphasizes the simple, spartan, minimalistic, monoblock aspect of T-series. The large flush, flat sheet of touch-sensitive LCD glass, with a total lack of buttons on the back, further emphasizes the spartan, monolithic nature of the T series. These aspects of the TL has been a *major* marketing point of the T-series from its inception. This is a design choice of Leica, based on the emphasis on form over function, and maintaining a particular camera aesthetic.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 22:40 UTC
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