T3

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 1, 2003

Comments

Total: 3471, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

RedFox88: This must mean the V/J cams are dead

@Roland Karlsson - There is nothing in the article or quotes that explicitly says Nikon is talking about only "ONE new camera." It is vague, at best. Your mind is working a little too hard on this. Time to take your medication, or go meditate, or go take some photos, or something.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 16:21 UTC
In reply to:

RedFox88: This must mean the V/J cams are dead

@Roland Karlsson - If it's just another 1-series camera, then it's not even worth talking about. The 1-series system and cameras already exist. So why would they talk about it as some new thing? It makes no sense if it's just another 1-series camera. As for making a 1" sensor smartphone, I doubt that either, unless they plan on grafting a smartphone onto a 1-series body. That doesn't sound likely at all.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 15:23 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: Breaking News: Nikon will ship a new mirrorless camera sometime this decade. :-)

@Jenkins84 - "Also what Sony is missing is to have a lens like the "Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E" budget lens for wildlife."

First of all, not even Nikon had this lens until just a couple years ago. Secondly, when you're holding a large telephoto, you're mainly holding the lens. The camera is just along for the ride. You shouldn't be having a death grip on the camera grip. Besides, I think most wildlife photogs will put such lenses on tripods or monopods anyways. And finally, let's not forget that the Sony FF mirrorless system has only been in existence 3 years, 9 months. It can't be expected to have every lens under the sun in such a short period of time. But maybe sometime soon there will be a Nikon smart adapter that will allow you to use this lens on Sony mirrorless bodies, just like you can with Canon lenses. That way, you could practically have every lens under the sun, because you'd have access to Sony's, Canon's and Nikon's lens library.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 23:17 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Why buying this non M series??
We love Leica M series lenses. But not this one.

@enrique santa - "Perhaps innovation is not put a phone interface in a cam perhaps a real innovation is put the interface in your brain."

Talk about looking a bit stupid, haha. That is a suggestion that is not likely to happen any time soon.

"the only cam that have had a real success in Leica is the Q"

Would you please cite any sales statistics to support your claim?

Also, the Leica Q is a fixed-lens camera with a very short lens. As I said before, aperture rings work well for shorter lenses because your left hand is always close to the aperture ring, but it doesn't work so well with larger lenses because when holding longer lenses your left hand is often in front of the aperture ring. This requires more hand movement to change the aperture. It's not as ergonomic and not as convenient. But obviously that's not the case with a camera such as the Leica Q which only has a short, fixed 28mm lens.

By the way, the Leica Q does not have an ISO dial.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 22:59 UTC
In reply to:

Andrew Higgins: With the iconic S rangefinder in their 100 year past, wouldn't that make a great design to base a Nikon mirrorless camera on? Fingers crossed they stay with the existing F mount, with either DX or FX sensor so Nikkor lenses can be used, with an adaptor if needed.
This mirrorless camera could seriously reboot Nikon at a crucial time in the company's fortunes.

If they based their mirrorless designs on "the iconic S rangefinder", they're not going to use F mount because F mount is designed for a specific lens register distance. Rangefinders and mirrorless cameras have much shorter lens register distances (because they don't have to leave room in from of the film plane/sensor plane for a mirror). And rangefinder/mirrorless lenses are designed for this shorter lens register distance. So if they based their mirrorless cameras on S rangefinder-style bodies, it's going to be a new mount with a short lens register. But you'll still be able to use F-mount lenses by attaching an adapter.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 22:24 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: Breaking News: Nikon will ship a new mirrorless camera sometime this decade. :-)

@Jenkins84 - I think it's a pretty good bet that Sony will do it before Nikon.

http://www.mirrorlessrumors.com/sony-will-launch-new-a7iii-135mm-400mm-fe-lens-year/

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 22:18 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Why buying this non M series??
We love Leica M series lenses. But not this one.

@enrique santa - Like I said, you seem to be a bit narrow-minded in thinking that there is only one way to do something. Thankfully, Leica isn't so narrow in their mindset. They realize that there are a lot of different ways to do things. That's why they offer a range of products and systems: M, T, SL, S systems.

Traditionalists like you are always going to hate change and modernization. How many people hated it when Canon stopped using aperture rings when they introduced the EOS system back in 1987? I'm sure a lot of traditionalists did! But since then, almost every system has followed Canon's path. Why? Because many find it better to put aperture control on a thumb wheel on the body, rather than as a ring on the lens, because it's easier and more ergonomic. You don't have to move your hand as much. This is particularly true with larger lenses where you might have to move your left hand a great distance to reach the aperture ring.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 22:08 UTC
In reply to:

OlyPent: Remember when people who shot FF used to prefer naturalistic, reserved colour? Pro cameras used to be tuned that way. Now, they all want garish colour, like old entry-level Nikons used to have. What changed?

I think you're making a baseless generalization about FF shooters. The notion that all FF shooters "prefer" images to look a certain way is ridiculous. As for how "pro cameras used to be tuned", serious users shoot RAW which allows them to "tune" the final image in any way they want.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 21:36 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Why buying this non M series??
We love Leica M series lenses. But not this one.

@enrique santa - You're just a narrow-minded person who thinks there's only one way to do something. Tradition is nice, but it doesn't mean you have to stick with it forever, for all of your products. Leica still sells their M series for people who want to stick to "tradition." But Leica S, SL and T systems have all eliminated aperture rings, and have gone with more modern designs. I think it's great that Leica is modernizing. They give their users a choice: old tradition (M system) or new modern design (S, SL, T systems). It's not a mistake; it's adapting to changing times, and staying contemporary, while still offering something for those who want to stick with traditional older designs. Companies can't just stick to the past.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 21:09 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Why buying this non M series??
We love Leica M series lenses. But not this one.

enrique santa- Canon and Nikon are the systems that are overwhelmingly used to "expert" pro photographers. And they stopped using aperture rings a long time ago. In fact, the Canon EOS system has NEVER used aperture rings. As for ISO dials, Canon and Nikon bodies don't have ISO dials either. (The only exception is the slow-selling, retro-style Nikon Df.) So if Canon and Nikon don't use aperture rings and ISO dials, why should the Leica TL2 use them?

The real issue here is that interface designs are modernizing, and some people don't like that. We no longer exist in an entirely mechanical world. You don't need a dial, button, ring, or knob for every feature that a camera has. There are other ways to do things now.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 19:57 UTC
In reply to:

RedFox88: This must mean the V/J cams are dead

@Jenkins84 - where did I say Nikon should enter m4/3? If you read my comment, I actually argued that Nikon shouldn't enter m4/3. Read, please.

As for m4/3, Panasonic does really well with m4/3 because Panasonic m4/3 is very popular with videographers. Panasonic is very strong with video. m4/3 is actually perfect for Panasonic because they are more focused on the video market, and m4/3 is great for that market. But for stills, most photographers still prefer APS-C or FF. That's why Oly doesn't do as well, because they cater more to stills photography.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 19:27 UTC
In reply to:

RedFox88: This must mean the V/J cams are dead

@Jenkins84 - No, the best "compromise" regarding cost and high quality output is definitely APS-C. Most people don't need massive resolution or noiseless ISO 12800, and most people don't want to pay the higher price to have FF. I find it a bit puzzling how so many people here now think the IQ from APS-C just isn't good enough. I find that to be a bit absurd, and it comes from the obsessive pixel-peeping culture that has tainted photography. No one views images at 100% magnification other than these pixel-peeping measurebators. Yes, if you want to get better IQ and greater DOF flexibility, and you don't mind spending more, go for FF. But if you don't , then APS-C is the better "compromise" between cost and IQ-- and camera/lens size.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 19:21 UTC
In reply to:

RedFox88: This must mean the V/J cams are dead

@Roland Karlsson - "But one thing I do know is that camera companies does not take it lightly to introduce a new system."

A few years ago, you could have easily said the same before Nikon introduced the 1-series. But they did it. An entirely new system.

I don't see them putting much more energy into their 1" system. The system already has 13 lenses, and they don't sell that well. Adding to the system isn't going to grow Nikon's market in the upcoming mirrorless era.

I can't imagine m4/3 doing much for Nikon either, because they aren't going to get any user lock-in with Nikon by using m4/3. It's basically an open system: you don't have to buy Nikon lenses, you don't have to buy Nikon bodies. That's not great for Nikon. Besides, they already have a small-format MILC system (1-series). Why another?

If Nikon gets serious about mirrorless, they'll do their own APS-C or FF system. Yes, it's an investment, but it's an investment for the long-term future. The Japanese look long-term.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 18:58 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Why buying this non M series??
We love Leica M series lenses. But not this one.

@enrique santa - First of all, hardly any camera systems have aperture rings these days. Those were abandoned by most systems long ago. Canon and Nikon stopped using aperture rings long ago. Are those systems not for "mature people"? Secondly, the Leica does have physical controls: twin top-plate dials that control your exposure parameters. Very easy to use and easy to access. And finally, rather than clutter the camera up with a bunch of buttons, knobs and switches, everything else is put on a customizable, very accessible touchscreen. I think it's a beautiful, elegant, and *effective* design.

As for this camera being for "young people", I think what they really mean is people who are youthful in mindset, as opposed to old, crotchety, and rigid in their mindset. Also keep in mind that there are plenty of wealthy people in the world. I fly all the time, and as I pass through the 1st class cabin on my way to my economy seat, I see all those $10,000+ airline seats are always full.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 17:34 UTC
In reply to:

T3: No more mechanical shutters. The future of cameras will be solid state electronic shutters. No mechanical mirrors, no mechanical shutters, no more phase detection modules that need calibration, etc. And I'm sure the manufacturers will welcome this too. After all, this is a big, costly headache for Nikon. Remember when Canon DSLRs had reflex mirror detachment issues? These are all mechanical issues that are costly. Fewer parts, fewer issues with those parts, fewer service issues, lower manufacturing costs.

@webber15 - I'm quite sure there will always be mechanically-oriented cameras for those for who prefer them. Things have a way of sticking around when there is a niche of users to support them. After all, you can still buy film and film cameras, you can still buy vinyl records and turntables. People have different preferences. Obviously, the tactile and audible sensation of a mechanical mirror and shutter do its thing has a certain appeal to some people. I have a Fuji X-E1 that I love because of the tactile feel of its body and controls. But the "tactile" appeal (for me) ends there. I would like the X-E1 even more if it had a fully-electronic mode which it, unfortunately, does not. I like silent shooting. The X-E1's shooting sound is quieter than most cameras, but I would prefer the option to shoot with no sound at all.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 22:09 UTC
On article Leica TL2 first impressions (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

yahoo2u: APSC sensor...fine.
Body only $2695 AUS...No.
There are plenty of APSC cameras on the market with same MP for way less with lenses attached and still way cheaper.
.....and here's the secret...they all have the ability to take nice images.

@Robgo2 - But what's it to you? If someone has the means to buy a Leica or a Rolex, and wants to buy these things, they should be able to. You can stick to your inexpensive Canon Rebel and Casio wristwatch. To each his own.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 19:58 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: It is obvious that any company in imaging looking to have a future would develop a large-sensor mirrorless and stick with it. So Nikon is worried about their survival and doing something about it, so they MUST develop mirrorless or die. All roadmaps lead to mirrorless sometime in the future.

For instance, Pentax has not even in inkling of mirrorless in the future and because of that, you can ascertain what you need to about the future.

Very exciting news and I bet Nikon is going give us what we all want- on sensor focus that works, along with low crop 4k, and insane high-ISO performance, plus access to great lenses.

@DPPMetro - When I say that Pentax should have made the K-1 a mirrorless camera, I mean a true short-flange mirrorless camera with dedicated mirrorless lenses, not just a DSLR with the mirror removed like the K-01. As you mentioned, they needed to make an entirely new line of lenses anyhow, for their FF DSLR. So it would have been better for them to do that entirely new line of lenses for a new short-flange mirrorless body.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 12:45 UTC
In reply to:

T3: No more mechanical shutters. The future of cameras will be solid state electronic shutters. No mechanical mirrors, no mechanical shutters, no more phase detection modules that need calibration, etc. And I'm sure the manufacturers will welcome this too. After all, this is a big, costly headache for Nikon. Remember when Canon DSLRs had reflex mirror detachment issues? These are all mechanical issues that are costly. Fewer parts, fewer issues with those parts, fewer service issues, lower manufacturing costs.

@webber15 - Think of all the video being shot the world today-- billions of frames of video-- all using electronic shutter. Think of all the security video cameras running perpetually throughout the world, capturing infinite numbers of frames with electronic shutter. That's how reliable and long-lived electronic shutter is. If all these video cameras were using mechanical shutters, they'd be toast in no time at all.

When people talk about pulling stills from high resolution video, in lieu of regular photography, they are doing so thanks to the fact that video is using electronic shutter. Here's Peter Hurley using a Red Epic in his photography studio to test it against his H3D-22 Hasselblad:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2EB0PTAyME

No one is worrying about electronic shutter wearing out the sensor during all this video capture! No one is thinking, "How much video can I shoot before I have to replace the sensor?" That's because electronic shutter does not wear out sensors.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 12:17 UTC
In reply to:

T3: No more mechanical shutters. The future of cameras will be solid state electronic shutters. No mechanical mirrors, no mechanical shutters, no more phase detection modules that need calibration, etc. And I'm sure the manufacturers will welcome this too. After all, this is a big, costly headache for Nikon. Remember when Canon DSLRs had reflex mirror detachment issues? These are all mechanical issues that are costly. Fewer parts, fewer issues with those parts, fewer service issues, lower manufacturing costs.

@webber15 - No, you clearly do not understand how electronic shutter works. Electronic shutter does not put "extra work" on the sensor. Basically, all electronic shutter is doing is telling the camera to record what's on the sensor at any given time. Electronic shutter is already in use for video capture. That's how shooting video on a digital sensor works: not with a mechanical shutter but with an electronic shutter. If you're shooting video at 60 fps, that 60 fps is being done with electronic shutter, not mechanical shutter running at 60 fps. So by your erroneous assumption, shooting video would shorten the life span of sensors. That's certainly not the case. With electronic shutter, there are no mechanical moving parts to wear out.

Mechanical shutters wear out. That's why mechanical shutters are given a life span (# of actuations). But sensors are not given a life span. Yes, they probably do have a life span, but the life span is so great it's not even worth mentioning.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 11:58 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: It is obvious that any company in imaging looking to have a future would develop a large-sensor mirrorless and stick with it. So Nikon is worried about their survival and doing something about it, so they MUST develop mirrorless or die. All roadmaps lead to mirrorless sometime in the future.

For instance, Pentax has not even in inkling of mirrorless in the future and because of that, you can ascertain what you need to about the future.

Very exciting news and I bet Nikon is going give us what we all want- on sensor focus that works, along with low crop 4k, and insane high-ISO performance, plus access to great lenses.

"For instance, Pentax has not even in inkling of mirrorless in the future and because of that, you can ascertain what you need to about the future."

Pentax should have made the K-1 a FF mirrorless camera. It was stupid for them to make it a FF DSLR. They could have been an early player in FF mirrorless, well ahead of Canon and Nikon. Instead, they chose to be a late player in FF DSLR, well behind Canon and Nikon.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 01:56 UTC
Total: 3471, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »