T3

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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Total: 4632, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mastering Light: as we've seen year after year, Nikon and Canon FF models will easily out sell this one.
By the time the fall buying season comes around not only will people STILL be buying more DSLRs, but they will be ordering Nikon and Canon FF mirrorless cameras on top.

Specs never mattered for cameras. And the average person can't tell any difference between stills from this camera and any FF cameras from 5 years ago (yeah we "know" better than them).

And the truth is there are cameras with smaller sensors that can do a heck of a lot more than this one for a lower price...including that defunct NX1 from YEARs ago.

@john Clinch - "Eye controlled auto focus was rolled out in 1996"

No, that was entirely different. Canon's ECF (Eye Control Focus) allowed you to select a focus point by staring at it. I had it in my Canon Elan IIe. It had three focus points. If I stared at the right AF point, the camera activated that focus point. If I stared at the left AF point, the camera activated that focus point.

Sony's Eye AF is totally different. It uses facial recognition to identify the subject's eye, is able to focus on the subject's eye, and is able to track it continuously.

So the two systems are totally opposite. Canon's Eye AF tracked the shooter's eye. Sony's Eye AF tracked the subject's eye. And Canon's system was very inconsistent because it was very dependant on the positioning of the user's eye at the viewfinder. It worked for some people, didn't work for other people, which is probably why they abandoned it. For me, it worked most of the time. But my camera only had 3 AF points.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 18:51 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

vaughanB: Did I read this correctly.....693 AF points ??? why??, I use 1 :-)

@Mastering Light - You have some serious emotional issues, dude. Why is it so hard for you to embrace a new type of camera that brings new capabilities to the world of photography? Just enjoy what it has to offer!

"Too bad the camera is crippled."

Oddly, that's the feeling I get when I go back to using my DSLR that doesn't have full viewfinder autofocus coverage, doesn't have face/eye AF, doesn't give me real-time exposure preview, doesn't give me a histogram inside the viewfinder, doesn't give me focus magnification or focus peaking, doesn't allow me to switch the viewfinder into black-and-white viewing mode, etc. I've become so accustomed to these useful features. They've become an integral part of my photography. Going back to a DSLR that can't do any of these things makes it feel "crippled."

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 15:31 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

vaughanB: Did I read this correctly.....693 AF points ??? why??, I use 1 :-)

@George1958 - "The new standard is to have more and more and more bells and whistles"

I don't think having focus points that cover the entire viewfinder frame is "bells and whistles." In actuality, that's how cameras should have been all along! But technology simply couldn't offer it up until now. So up until now, we've adapted to the status quo of only having focus points clustered in the center of the frame. We've used work-arounds like "focus-lock, re-compose", etc. The reality is that a camera should be able to track or acquire focus on your subject WHEREVER they are in the frame. But only until recently has technology allowed us to do this. For me, as a former DSLR user who now uses mirrorless, having focus coverage THROUGHOUT the entire viewfinder is now the new standard, as well as having face/eye AF. It's not a "bell and whistle" for me. It's how cameras should have been all along.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 15:25 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

KW Phua: If this is for the Pro's, then build quality & weather seal must be good. Reliability is so important when you cover event. Imagine when carried two cameras with Dual R strap, very often they hit each other or hit something when you are moving around very fast to catch the moment. In some cases need to carry three cameras, the situation is worst. Sudden rain also caught you by surprise. (same for the lens)

@Vignes - The chassis of Sony's latest mirrorless bodies is actually very solid. It's practically a monoblock body comprised of just 4 pieces of magnesium alloy:

https://cdn.photographylife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Sony-A9-Chassis.jpg

In comparison, larger DSLRs are still comprised of many thin panels of magnesium that need to cover much larger areas of space. People don't realize this, but while magnesium is very stiff it is also brittle. Therefore, it can be prone to cracking if dropped which happens often with larger magnesium DSLR bodies which use large sheets of molded magnesium to cover their larger, heavier bodies:

https://d1ro734fq21xhf.cloudfront.net/attachments/00XHNe-280431584.jpg

http://www.moonsphoto.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/1DX_34166.jpg

http://i56.tinypic.com/14ma0cn.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8217/8375996773_8faef56139.jpg

In the future, mirrorless bodies with their simpler, tighter construction will definitely be the dominant camera.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 14:43 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: A future 5DIII. Well done Sony. Well done. And yes this specific product does impact Canon and Nikon future models' features and pricing, in a strong way. No doubt about it.

I predict The A7III will take the number 1 sales spot from Canon on most online/stores (B&H, Amazon, etc) and we all know that's something Canon go crazy about, sales.

@kodacolor200 - Haha, so what does "31 major cinematic features" have to do with your original comments that film was on the rise because "serious kids these days shoot on film" and "film is enjoying year on year growth, and this is driven largely by the younger Instagram generation"?!? You are seriously grasping at straws. The few "kids" using film for their photography is a tiny blip on the radar compared to its overwhelming decline. And it isn't just general disinterest in film. There are so many other factors, such as high cost, the lack of film processing labs, the lack of immediacy that people are accustomed to these days, the lack of shareability that people are accustomed to these days, the lack of quality and resolution that people are accustomed to these days, etc, etc, etc. Film photography is a very small niche of the market. Times change, things change. Some people (such as yourself) seem to have trouble dealing with change.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 14:20 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

XeroJay: Wow, so many sour grapes in the comments... Can't say I'm surprised though. Many people have a hard time accepting when something new surpasses what they've grown accustomed to. The writing is on the wall for the DSLR, and it's the A7III that wrote it. The DSLR is basically at the end of it's evolution as mirroress is in it's infancy, and it's at this critical point where the mirroress has just demonstrated that it is now the more capable system in most regards.

"In biology, the evolution of something new does not necessarily kill the old; it may simply be another branch to co exist. It may be the same here. Time will tell."

In biology, there are also plenty of examples of extinction.

I don't think DSLRs will go extinct, but their dominance is certainly in its twilight days. It's like record players and vinyl. Vinyl records are still being produced and sold. But they are certainly not as prevalent and popular as they use to be.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 06:17 UTC
On article Demo: Sony a7R III's impressive Eye AF (136 comments in total)
In reply to:

T3: This is just an example of why you need to get that stinking mirror out of the way of the sensor! When you allow the image sensor to see the scene, it can do so much more. As sensor AI and machine learning become more advanced, these sensors will become ever smarter. For example, I want the sensor to be able to recognize a specific person, track that person even in a crowd, and use specific exposure parameters specifically for the unique skin tone of that person. I can also see these sensors being able to see when your subject is blinking and avoid taking the shot at that moment (if you tell the camera to avoid capturing the image when your subject is blinking).

@TN Args - Separate PDAF modules have their own compromises. For one thing, they can result in focus calibration issues because everything along the path to the focus module has to line up just right, and the distance the light travels to the focus module has to be exactly the same as the distance directly to the image sensor.

https://www.discoverdigitalphotography.com/2014/what-are-front-focus-and-back-focus/

If anything is off, it results in a focus calibration issue. That's never an issue with on-sensor AF because the focus sensor and the image sensor are in exactly the same place.

The other issue with having a separate PDAF module is focus point coverage, which is limited to the central region of the image.
https://nikonrumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/AF-area-comparison-between-Nikon-D610-D750-and-D810-cameras.jpg
That's not an issue with on-sensor AF because AF points can be placed practically anywhere on the image sensor.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 06:02 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mastering Light: as we've seen year after year, Nikon and Canon FF models will easily out sell this one.
By the time the fall buying season comes around not only will people STILL be buying more DSLRs, but they will be ordering Nikon and Canon FF mirrorless cameras on top.

Specs never mattered for cameras. And the average person can't tell any difference between stills from this camera and any FF cameras from 5 years ago (yeah we "know" better than them).

And the truth is there are cameras with smaller sensors that can do a heck of a lot more than this one for a lower price...including that defunct NX1 from YEARs ago.

Haha, so is that the argument that you are now resorting too? "Specs don't matter?" Sounds like you went from grasping at straws to simply throwing in the towel!

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 01:41 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: A future 5DIII. Well done Sony. Well done. And yes this specific product does impact Canon and Nikon future models' features and pricing, in a strong way. No doubt about it.

I predict The A7III will take the number 1 sales spot from Canon on most online/stores (B&H, Amazon, etc) and we all know that's something Canon go crazy about, sales.

@kodacolor200-
From Roger Cicala's teardown of the A7R:

"This is rather amazing. The completely disassembled Sony A7R consists of about a dozen major pieces, held together with 29 screws of just three different sizes. A typical DSLR has around 120 screws of 11 different sizes. You might not care less about that, but do you know what I thought about? How much easier it will be to fix this camera when it breaks. How much simpler it must be to perform all the calibration that must be done during assembly. And how much simpler it must be to assemble the A7R in the first place. In other words, how much cheaper it must be to make this camera, than to make a DSLR."

https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2014/01/the-a7r-teardown-a-look-inside-sonys-awesome-full-frame-mirrorless-camera/

DSLRs will lose against mirrorless when it comes to production cost. DSLRs bear the cost of far more parts/complexity while trying to add "mirrorless" Live View capabilities (as well as the associated R&D costs).

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 01:25 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: A future 5DIII. Well done Sony. Well done. And yes this specific product does impact Canon and Nikon future models' features and pricing, in a strong way. No doubt about it.

I predict The A7III will take the number 1 sales spot from Canon on most online/stores (B&H, Amazon, etc) and we all know that's something Canon go crazy about, sales.

@kodacolor200 - I think you are seriously out of touch. Yes, Fuji Instax instant film is doing well, but 35mm roll film continues to decline.

https://petapixel.com/2017/10/27/fujifilm-killing-off-films-2018-things-look-grim/

https://www.casualphotophile.com/2018/03/30/fujifilm-to-discontinue-acros-100-film-in-october-2018/

https://www.thephoblographer.com/2018/02/11/fujifilm-announces-discontinuation-800-1600-iso-films/

So don't confuse the success of Instax "film" with a resurgence of 35mm film. They are two totally different things, but they are lumped into the same financial bucket.

As for "far more attainable prices", that's not really the case either. Sony offers the A7 for $798, A7 II with IBIS for $1098. The A6000 that has 179 AF points covering almost the entire image frame, with face/eye AF, and 11fps bursts, is only $548. In the long run, DSLRs will definitely lose to mirrorless on price, especially when comparing price-per-specs because mirrorless is cheaper to produce.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 01:21 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: By definition these type of gear reviews cannot take into account long term usage. They are done over a relatively short period of time, and then the reviewers move on to the next piece of new gear.

But that means they inevitably focus on specs and give less attention to issues that a lot of users really care about: overall usability and reliability. And it is in those areas that unfortunately Sony has a poor reputation.

So it is regrettable to say that this camera sets a "new benchmark for FF cameras" as that cannot be said. For instance, if and when this camera proves less reliable than the competition, could it be said it sets this new benchmark?

We all have our opinions as to what is important in our choices of gear, but IMHO this camera sets no new benchmark or standard. It is a good camera, no doubt, but it has to prove itself over time.

@Thoughts R Us - "don't tell me it's this breakthrough camera when it is not."

It's a breakthrough camera. Show me another camera with superb autofocus, with 693 AF points covering 93% of the image frame, 5-axis IBIS, face/eye AF, facial recognition and registration, 10fps, silent electronic shutter with zero shutter shock, oversampled 4K/24p video taken from full width 6K, AF joystick, touchscreen, full compatibility with E-mount, A-mount, and EF-mount lenses, no need for micro-adjust focus calibration EVER, all for just $2000?

And yes, by the end of the year I'll be buying one. It's the camera I've been waiting for. Sony is doing very well in the FF ILC market. In comparison, Canon's 6D MKII was a flop, probably one of the most disappointing FF DSLRs Canon has ever introduced. It just goes to show, not everyone blindly idolizes brands like you do. Open your eyes, broaden your mind. Try other brands. You'll realize that ALL brands, ALL cameras have their strengths and weaknesses.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 23:58 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonby: "Perceptible lag when raising the camera to your eye, as it switches from the screen to the electronic viewfinder"

Pretty major issue in most shooting situations if you ask me. This is a behaviour that irritates the hell out of me whenever I've used a mirrorless camera.

@Thoughts R Us - I think you're just grasping at straws, looking for any reason to hate Sony. You sound like a biased partisan hack. I own a large variety of cameras (Canon, Sony, Fuji, Olympus, and even Samsung):

https://ibb.co/cXhw4H

https://ibb.co/jjEFyc

They ALL have their pros and cons. There is no perfect camera that gets everything right. As for Sony's menus, I don't see what the big deal is. I can find things fine. Is it the best menu of any camera? No. One of the most aggravating menus I've used is in my Canon EOS M! The best menu system of any camera I've ever used was in my Samsung NX30. Samsung's expertise in designing smartphone interfaces really showed. It was a pleasure to use.

In reality, no menu system is "so obtuse" that you can't find what you want. In those cases, I would say that it's probably the user who is a bit obtuse.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 23:27 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: By definition these type of gear reviews cannot take into account long term usage. They are done over a relatively short period of time, and then the reviewers move on to the next piece of new gear.

But that means they inevitably focus on specs and give less attention to issues that a lot of users really care about: overall usability and reliability. And it is in those areas that unfortunately Sony has a poor reputation.

So it is regrettable to say that this camera sets a "new benchmark for FF cameras" as that cannot be said. For instance, if and when this camera proves less reliable than the competition, could it be said it sets this new benchmark?

We all have our opinions as to what is important in our choices of gear, but IMHO this camera sets no new benchmark or standard. It is a good camera, no doubt, but it has to prove itself over time.

@Thoughts R Us - As I said, the fast iterative process and product evolution that Sony moves with ultimately results in better products in a shorter period of time. Sony is moving FAST. People seem to forget that the Sony FF mirrorless system is not even 5 years old (first A7 was introduced in October 2013)! And yet, in that time they have introduced 9 FF mirrorless bodies (A7, A7S, A7R, A7II, A7RII, A7SII, A9, A7RIII, A7III). Rapid evolution beats out slow evolution in the long run.

As a Canon user, I know all too well how slowly Canon moves. They move at a glacial pace. Improvements come at a trickle.

As for this "water hose test", ask yourself what true practical value that has. I've owned the Canon 10D, 20D, 40D, 5D, and 60D. Of all those cameras, only the 60D had weather sealing. And never once did I do a "water hose test" on any of these cameras. People like you are truly grasping at straws. I find the "water hose test" the least valuable test of a camera, lol.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 20:08 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: By definition these type of gear reviews cannot take into account long term usage. They are done over a relatively short period of time, and then the reviewers move on to the next piece of new gear.

But that means they inevitably focus on specs and give less attention to issues that a lot of users really care about: overall usability and reliability. And it is in those areas that unfortunately Sony has a poor reputation.

So it is regrettable to say that this camera sets a "new benchmark for FF cameras" as that cannot be said. For instance, if and when this camera proves less reliable than the competition, could it be said it sets this new benchmark?

We all have our opinions as to what is important in our choices of gear, but IMHO this camera sets no new benchmark or standard. It is a good camera, no doubt, but it has to prove itself over time.

@Thoughts R Us - One thing I see is that Sony is far more responsive and moves faster to address any issues than Canon and Nikon historically have done. In the long run, that fast iterative process and quick response means better products, faster. It is a quicker course of product evolution, rather than the slow, plodding, glacial pace that other manufacturers tend to move in.

There are always going to be people who are very fearful and uncomfortable with changes to the status quo. It seems like you are getting very wound up over the term "benchmark" simply because it is being applied to Sony. Your bias is pretty clear. This is a threat to the status quo that you are accustomed to. The reality is that things change. I remember Nikonians expressing the same fearful, disdainful attitude towards Canon EOS back when it was a relatively new system.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 19:47 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: By definition these type of gear reviews cannot take into account long term usage. They are done over a relatively short period of time, and then the reviewers move on to the next piece of new gear.

But that means they inevitably focus on specs and give less attention to issues that a lot of users really care about: overall usability and reliability. And it is in those areas that unfortunately Sony has a poor reputation.

So it is regrettable to say that this camera sets a "new benchmark for FF cameras" as that cannot be said. For instance, if and when this camera proves less reliable than the competition, could it be said it sets this new benchmark?

We all have our opinions as to what is important in our choices of gear, but IMHO this camera sets no new benchmark or standard. It is a good camera, no doubt, but it has to prove itself over time.

@Thoughts R Us - You are forgetting that Canon and Nikon cameras have received their own share of problems. Remember when Canon's mirrors were falling out?

https://petapixel.com/2015/05/13/canon-warns-the-original-5d-may-suffer-from-mirror-separation/

Remember when Nikon was recalling their cameras for shutter issues?
https://petapixel.com/2016/03/01/nikon-recalls-d750-shutter-issue/

Remember that DSLRs had focus calibration issues that resulted in all decent-level DSLRs now having micro-adjust focus calibration capability?

The reality is that you can Google "Canon quality control issues" or "Nikon quality control issues" and get plenty of hits. If you look for dirt, you can find it. That applies to practically every brand, whether it be Apple, or Canon, or Nikon, or Sony. The reality is that it's just something like FUD-meisters like you use to spread FUD against other brands that you may not like.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 19:42 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: By definition these type of gear reviews cannot take into account long term usage. They are done over a relatively short period of time, and then the reviewers move on to the next piece of new gear.

But that means they inevitably focus on specs and give less attention to issues that a lot of users really care about: overall usability and reliability. And it is in those areas that unfortunately Sony has a poor reputation.

So it is regrettable to say that this camera sets a "new benchmark for FF cameras" as that cannot be said. For instance, if and when this camera proves less reliable than the competition, could it be said it sets this new benchmark?

We all have our opinions as to what is important in our choices of gear, but IMHO this camera sets no new benchmark or standard. It is a good camera, no doubt, but it has to prove itself over time.

Benchmarks are mainly about specs and performance at the time of introduction relative to competing products. That's just the way it is. Benchmarks should be concrete, measurable, quantifiable things. The whole concept of "how to prove itself over time" is nebulous, vague, subjective and difficult to quantify. I think you're just grasping at straws, and trying to move the goal post around. I have cameras that have relatively low specs, but to me they have "proven themselves over time." However, they certainly would NOT have ever qualified as setting any new "benchmark" for photography.

I'm gonna bet that the Sony A7III will outlast most DSLRs because it has far fewer moving parts, far fewer components, and a very simple, solid body.

https://www.mirrorlessrumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/A9magn-700x319.jpg

DSLRs are like Rube-Goldberg devices, with their huge number of components and complexity.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 19:25 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonby: "Perceptible lag when raising the camera to your eye, as it switches from the screen to the electronic viewfinder"

Pretty major issue in most shooting situations if you ask me. This is a behaviour that irritates the hell out of me whenever I've used a mirrorless camera.

@Thoughts R Us- No, it's not "poor design." Today's cameras offer a huge range of customizability because different shooters have different preferences. Set up your camera the way you want it, and you're good to go. But how you may want it is not how I may want it. That's why we have these customization settings. It's not a one-size-fits-all world. I also think the "issue" of auto EVF switching is overblown when it comes to real-world shooting. And it will most likely become less of an issue in the future. For example, I remember when my first DSLR, the Canon 10D, took 2 seconds to wake from sleep! Yes, look it up! At one time, Canon's DSLR really did take that long to wake up from sleep. And yet, I was still able to shoot weddings with it! Two seconds is waaaaay longer than the very short time it takes today's mirrorless cameras to switch between EVF and rear LCD. But if you have no need for such auto switching, then just turn it off!

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 19:05 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonby: "Perceptible lag when raising the camera to your eye, as it switches from the screen to the electronic viewfinder"

Pretty major issue in most shooting situations if you ask me. This is a behaviour that irritates the hell out of me whenever I've used a mirrorless camera.

You can turn off the auto switching. There is a lot of customizability with these cameras. A lot of people choose manual switching between EVF and rear screen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGgrA0p1oJs

The "major issue" then goes away.

For me, I keep the camera on auto switching most of the time, and it's rarely ever been an issue. "Perceptible" does not necessarily mean disruptively impactful. But in situations where I do need that split-second "raise the camera to my eye and shoot immediately, with no perceptible delay in EVF switching" situation-- like for street shooting-- I turn off auto switching. However, for most shooting, it's not an issue.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 18:51 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: A future 5DIII. Well done Sony. Well done. And yes this specific product does impact Canon and Nikon future models' features and pricing, in a strong way. No doubt about it.

I predict The A7III will take the number 1 sales spot from Canon on most online/stores (B&H, Amazon, etc) and we all know that's something Canon go crazy about, sales.

@kodacolor200 - That's true of the older generation. I don't see that so much with the younger generation. For example, the younger generation follows people like Youtube star Casey Neistat who has 9.3 million subscribers (yes, million!). He started using Sony mirrorless:

https://www.thephoblographer.com/2017/01/26/casey-neistat-gives-dark-side-goes-sony/

People like Neistat are very influential, especially with the younger generation. I talk to a lot of younger people, and they have no brand loyalty to Canon and Nikon.

BTW, Nikonians used the "brand loyalty" argument against Canon when Canon first launched the EOS system. Nikonians argued that Canon would never gain ground against Nikon because of "brand loyalty" to Nikon (combined with the fact that Canon had abandoned their FD users when Canon switched to EOS, which many Canon users were livid over). "Brand loyalty" didn't keep lots of Nikon users from switching over to Canon EOS, allowing Canon EOS to rise to dominance!

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 17:52 UTC
On article Sony a7 III Review (1596 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: A future 5DIII. Well done Sony. Well done. And yes this specific product does impact Canon and Nikon future models' features and pricing, in a strong way. No doubt about it.

I predict The A7III will take the number 1 sales spot from Canon on most online/stores (B&H, Amazon, etc) and we all know that's something Canon go crazy about, sales.

@kodacolor200 - "Mirrorless is a prosumer driven format."

Maybe. If that's the case, it's smart that Sony is so aggressively targeting the prosumer market where all the sales are. The A7 II is now only $1098:

https://www.amazon.com/Sony-Alpha-Mirrorless-Digital-Camera/dp/B00PX8CHO6

I think targeting the prosumer market is a smart strategy. Today's "prosumers" end up being tomorrow's pros. After all, pros aren't magically born out of the womb as pros. They all have to start somewhere. Sony is definitely targeting the next generation of photographers. Most current pros are typically very set in their ways, and will stick to their DSLRs regardless of whether Canon or Nikon come out with mirrorless bodies.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 16:52 UTC
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