T3

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Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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Total: 2832, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Vivid1: Can you REALLY imagine a bunch of top Sports Illustrated photographers ditching their very reliable Canon or Nikon gear, which they have been using for years, just to switch to a body with 20fps? A body but with questionable AF and ZERO pro support. Go tell a top pro to use their 600/f4 or 400/2.8 lenses with a THIRD PARTY adapter and wade through TERRIBLE ergonomics to get the shot that puts bread on the table???

@Calvin Chann - I think once you get your camera set up, you'll be good to go. During game time, no one is fiddling with settings. It's all about having the camera ready to go so all you have to do is grab, point, shoot. And it's really not that hard to find the shutter button from one camera to the next, lol.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 18:35 UTC
In reply to:

vesa1tahti: Why to switch from Canon to Sony? Or from Nikon to Sony? What are the real advantages of Sony over Canon or Nikon? Maybe a little bit better speed, nothing else. Who really needs 20 fps in everyday professional shooting? Especially Nikon does have much better ergonomics than any Sony. And take a look at the lens selection available to Canon and Nikon.

Plenty of reasons. Smaller, lighter, face/eye detection AF, 5-axis IBIS so every lens you put on it gets image stabilization, totally silent shooting so you can shoot anywhere and everywhere without disturbing anyone, 20fps when you need it, you can use Canon and Nikon lenses on it (via smart adapters), massive AF point frame coverage (92% of the frame), 693 AF points (watch this video, particularly at 0:50 into the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4mL8iRtUQI)

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 15:41 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1170 comments in total)
In reply to:

Janoch: Interested in knowing how many batteries were required to shoot the mentioned 2800 photos?

Power management is obviously a lot better in the A9 than in previous mirrorless cameras. Could one reason be that an electronic shutter consumes less power than running a mechanical shutter? I would think that running a mechanical shutter at high frame rate in a burst would consumer a fair degree of power in addition to whatever power the sensor is consuming. Now, with that out of the way, you have one less source of power consumption. And obviously the larger battery capacity really helps too (which I think all mirrorless cameras should have).

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 15:32 UTC
In reply to:

Vivid1: Can you REALLY imagine a bunch of top Sports Illustrated photographers ditching their very reliable Canon or Nikon gear, which they have been using for years, just to switch to a body with 20fps? A body but with questionable AF and ZERO pro support. Go tell a top pro to use their 600/f4 or 400/2.8 lenses with a THIRD PARTY adapter and wade through TERRIBLE ergonomics to get the shot that puts bread on the table???

Because of the adaptability of Sony bodies, a camera such as the A9 will first probably start as an add-on for pros. All sports pros have multiple secondary bodies. And not all of them have massive telephotos mounted on them. So that's the "in" for the A9: as a lighter secondary body that can still blast away at 20fps. And they can still use their Canon/Nikon lenses. It'll be the universal compatibility and adaptability of the A9 that will get them in the door. And it certainly doesn't hurt that it's a lot less expensive, too.

The other factor that people don't realize is that remote cameras are now widely used in sports photography. They are mounted in the rafters at basketball games, put next to the track at track-and-field events, mounted on robotic gimbals.
https://goo.gl/xPNVfN
https://goo.gl/Io0QmU
https://goo.gl/WwlIjt
A camera such as the A9 is perfect for such applications, and I can easily see SI buying a ton of these cameras for that purpose.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 15:21 UTC
In reply to:

ariot: Aside from professionals who must have a quiet camera, the target market for this camera is not the professional shooter.

This is a consumer model familiar to the car companies. They make huge mark-ups selling vehicles with capabilities rarely used to people who don't really need them but want them.

Sure it is a great camera, yes. Maybe some need it, yes. But you go broke selling to need, you have to sell to a WANT.

Sports and wildlife pros are not the target demo. Most of the hot PJs who are making waves and haven't gotten sponsored yet are shooting with 5 year old cameras and lenses.

This is for consumers who want specs, that's who makes your executives wealthy. Same as it ever was.

The wedding photography market is massive. Just go to the WPPI Expo in Las Vegas. Huge! The A7/A9 bodies will be very attractive to wedding professionals. They are lighter, more compact, have amazing face/eye detection (which is extremely valuable for people, portrait, wedding shooting), they shoot silent (at least the A9 does), they make EVERY lens a stabilized lens thanks to IBIS, you can still use your Canon and Nikon lenses. And unlike sports/wildlife shooters, wedding photographers aren't sitting out in pouring rain with massive telephoto primes. Plus, outside of sports photography, other pros aren't so much into the "mine is bigger than yours" mentality regarding camera equipment that seems to dominate the sports world.

My point is that "pro shooters" isn't just sports and pj. And wedding photographers arguably make a lot more money than cash-strapped pjs working for someone else. And it's a tax write-off.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 15:00 UTC
On article Sony a9: Why being better might not be enough (765 comments in total)
In reply to:

GarysInSoCal: I actually feel very sorry for all those who have bought ANY other Sony camera in the past... especially the cropped sensor buyers with lenses incompatible to the A9. With one fail swoop... Sony comes out with a camera that totally obliterates all their previous offerings (statistically) and renders a few dozen of their past lens offerings as useless pieces of glass. Compatible upgrades is where it's at people... and Nikon places this game better than any other DSLR manufacturer... ;)

@GarysInSoCal - Additionally, my point here is also to address your comment that "compatible upgrades is where it's at people..." I think Sony definitely understands that. They realize that as people eventually move to mirrorless, they definitely want to provide compatibility with other lenses, regardless of what system you might use.

They even tout and demo its adaptability, and even release firmware to improve its adaptability with non-Sony lenses:
https://goo.gl/LLDAUa
https://goo.gl/24VwcZ

I think Sony wants to position their mirrorless cameras as basically "universal" cameras that can take any lens. In short, yes, Sony cares about compatibility/adaptability. They know that compatibility is "where it's at", which is why they are so open to making it easier and more effective to do-- more than any other company is.

I see a day when you can use a mirrorless body such as an A10 or A11, and be able to use any Canon or Nikon lens with it, with a smart adapter, no holds barred.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 14:52 UTC
On article Sony a9: Why being better might not be enough (765 comments in total)
In reply to:

GarysInSoCal: I actually feel very sorry for all those who have bought ANY other Sony camera in the past... especially the cropped sensor buyers with lenses incompatible to the A9. With one fail swoop... Sony comes out with a camera that totally obliterates all their previous offerings (statistically) and renders a few dozen of their past lens offerings as useless pieces of glass. Compatible upgrades is where it's at people... and Nikon places this game better than any other DSLR manufacturer... ;)

@GarysInSoCal - Obviously you did NOT understand that Sony did NOT "obliterate all their previous offerings...and renders a few dozen of their past lens offerings as useless pieces of glass" as you claimed. Furthermore, regarding light loss, it does not apply to ALL adapters for Sony E-mount. For example, E-mount adapters for Canon and Nikon lenses do not result in any light loss. You are forgetting the breadth of compatibility of Sony E-mount. It extends beyond just Sony lenses. And of course, your belief regarding incompatibility of E-mount APS-C lenses is also false.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 14:45 UTC
On article Sony a9: Why being better might not be enough (765 comments in total)
In reply to:

Triplet Perar: NIKON 1 V3 was Sony a9 killer of yesterday! It delivered the fps, the accuracy, the speed, and all photographers ever needed for sports action (20 fps tracking, 60 fps fixed focus, etc), and a Nikon 1 kit could be assembled for peanuts compared to an a9 set.
But again, the tremendous prejudice of the digital photography snobbery sniggers at anything with sensor smaller than FF, and less than a truckload of equipment to show off. Just read the sorrowful comments in other thread about "death of Nikon 1". What a horrible attitude towards a genuinely great system! But geeks celebrate a9 years later — despite fact that technology already was there that allowed work to be done, even to sports photographers. It shows the pathetic state of this market — it is not about the essence, but all about pretence, all about snobbery.

I think there is a lot of truth to what you've said, sadly. There is certainly a "mine is bigger than yours" component to photography gear. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that the industry is dominated by male egos.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 14:17 UTC
In reply to:

davidkachel: Is this a joke? Since Sony has already established its complete willingness to simply abandon photographers on a whim, I assume you are joking.
I sold my a900 and lenses and bought Nikon because Sony gave me no upgrade path. In other words, abandoned me.
The jump in image quality with Nikon was, I must say, quite startling. I don't necessarily regret owning the Sony camera, but I am certainly glad to be rid of them.
Nikon will never tell me how it is just too bad they stopped making optical viewfinder pro cameras, and they will never simply write off the lenses I am using, AND they won't try to tell me that spending several thousand dollars more to replace a 25 megapixel camera with another 25 megapixel camera is an "upgrade". And waddya know, not having that stupid blur adding filter caused another dramatic improvement in my images. Sony to Nikon... one of the best decisions of my life. I guess I should thank Sony for pizzing me off.

Well, keep in mind that Canon did the same thing when they abandoned their FD system and switched to EOS/EF back in the late 1980s. But they switched cold-turkey, with little to no adaptability of FD lenses to newer EOS bodies, and they stopped offering FD bodies altogether. It REALLY angered a LOT of people. But in the long run, it did not hurt them. Sometimes, you have to upset some people in the short term to get to where you want to go in the long run.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 00:43 UTC
In reply to:

User6836700550: We are talking about the FUTURE- Sony A9, A10, etc. for years to come. This is not a static situation. Corporations, photographers need new equipment at intervals;
Just as Boeing and AirBus compete, so might Sony and the great Canon/Nikon companies. And who knows, perhaps real Sony innovation may integrate with professional reliability and confidence and soon they'll receive a well-deserved share?

People also have to remember that new users are entering the market every day. I think it's silly to assume that the entire market-- for years to come-- consists exclusively of a fixed pool of current users who already have Canon/Nikon gear. As future generations enter the market, with no prior loyalties, it's a whole new ballgame.

Just the other day, popular YouTuber Casey Neistat announced that he had switched to using a Sony A7S II for his vlogging. You oldsters may not know who Casey is, but the younger generation sure does! (He has over 7 million subscribers!) In 2 days, his video already has almost 2.4 million views!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3t_Phob6Gs

http://www.thephoblographer.com/2017/01/26/casey-neistat-gives-dark-side-goes-sony/

Neistat talks to the younger generation. The younger generation pays attention to what he uses. The younger gen is going to determine what future market share will look like. If Neistat is talking up Sony FF MILC, that's a very big deal.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 23:23 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: There's nothing about Sony's a9 that would make me want to switch to their still largely experimental camera system. I totally "trust" and love my OVF equipped, 100% reliable, ergonomically brilliant, Canon DSLRs, their EF lenses, their 600RT speedlights, and their "best in the camera industry" customer service, far too much to gamble on a "FrankenSony" spec sheet experiment.

Still, it'll be fun to see how many early adopters actually buy into Sony's new marketing creation. Go get em, Sony! 😎

@Donnie G- What in the world are you talking about? Even with keeping Sony's A system alive, they are still basically moving at the same pace of development as Canon did when they went "all in" with EOS, if not faster. And I think it's very smart that Sony didn't abandon their A-system users, while still offering adaptability of those A-system lenses on E-mount bodies.

As I said in a previous post, I don't think it's smart to be so dismissive of Sony at this point. Canon was in the same position as Sony is in now. And if anything, Sony has a lot of additional advantages that Canon didn't have. I'm just saying: let's not be so cocky and dismissive.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 22:50 UTC
In reply to:

Neil189: If the Sony doesn't make a sound and there is no black out, how do you know when you're actually taking pictures?

I think technology is a double edge sword. To me, it's clear what is coming. In the future you will be able to just video the subject, then go back later and grab 50 megapixel stills from it. Yes you will get the best possible pose or position, but it sure doesn't seem as fun to me. The excitement of getting what you wanted, and the experience needed to do so, will both diminish. I'm sure they said the same thing about auto focus and ISO capabilitye etc., but at some point there are diminishing returns.

"If the Sony doesn't make a sound and there is no black out, how do you know when you're actually taking pictures?"

First of all, you can set the camera to emit an artificial shutter sound. Secondly, you can set a visual indicator in the frame that basically blinks every time a shot is taken. Watch this video, below. You'll hear the artificial shutter sound, and you'll see the flicker of what looks like "frame lines" on the screen, which indicate that an image is being captured:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZXFI-eIXk8

You can see and hear both in this demo too:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6iHmGp4nMo

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 22:02 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: I think Nikon needs an APS-C mirrorless camera. That sensor size is where the biggest ILC sales volume is.

@leonche64 - On the other hand, maybe they scrapped the DL series to shift their energy towards an APS-C or FF mirrorless system. Putting resources into an APS-C or FF system is going to have much greater long-term ROI than a bunch of compact cameras that you can't sell additional lenses for. Fixed-lens cameras are a one-and-done purchase.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 21:54 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: I like my J5 with 6-13VR and 32 1.2. No other camera with 1'' sensor allows for such freedom of creative choice in such a tiny package as Nikon 1. Nikon literally has no competition in this segment. All other brands only offer fixed lens options. Too bad Nikon doesn't see it as an opportunity to offer something unique. Kind of like that salesman who thought that there was no market for a shoe company in a courtly where everyone walks barefoot. Sometimes all that's needed is to show the alternative to create the market.

@Jared Huntr - Geez, is deeper DOF really an issue? If anything, deeper DOF is very easy to get. I don't think that's much of an issue. As for 3:2, I don't find that much of an issue either. You can crop to 3:2 if you want, or even shoot in 3:2 with m4/3 and you'd still be left with a larger sensor area than what the Nikon 1 has-- because CX format is freaking tiny:

https://www.slrlounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/sensor_sizes.jpg

Ironically, I find myself cropping most of my 3:2 images to something closer to 4:3 anyways.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 17:47 UTC
In reply to:

iAPX: Two business days turnaround, that could translate to 4 or 5 real-world days?!?

A serious photographer using these ones might loose more than the body cost during this time, if he/her haven't a spare body!

Right, because a serious photographer only has a single camera that his entire business depends on. Uh-huh.

By the way, there are rental options. Borrowlenses.com already has the GFX available for rental.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 17:35 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1170 comments in total)
In reply to:

trilogy1000: I'm a traditionalist and would like to see a shutter speed dial and aperture ring but I can't see Sony doing it - it's just not their thing. Having said that, the additional dials on the a9 look good and will remove a lot of the need to hunt through the menu system. Hopefully those design changes will trickle down to the a7 series.

@lolopasstrail- Yeah, but there are AIS adapters for Sony E-mount. And you get the added benefit of now having all those lenses be image stabilized, thanks to Sony's 5-axis in-body image stabilization. Also, I find it a LOT easier to manually focus with EVFs (thanks to Focus Peaking and Focus Magnification) than it is with DSLRs. I highly recommend anyone who is interested in manual focus lenses to definitely get a camera with an EVF. Makes a huge difference. I put a split-prism focusing screen in my DSLR, and it's still not as good. If manual focus is your thing, I think it would be quite a pleasure to manually focus with the A9's big, bright, beautiful EVF.

Notice that there are a lot of new third-party manual focus lenses that have been introduced for mirrorless recently. It's basically an acknowledgement that EVFs finally make manual focusing a viable and effective option again.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:49 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: How much they paid for this ad?
In the future, please add an "ad" logo on the front page to save our time.

Geez, what an insecure guy you are Edmond! It's a new lens introduction. It's news. It's interesting (these are pretty darn FAST lenses for medium format)!

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:43 UTC
In reply to:

fatdeeman: The A9 is such a bold challenge it seems a shame they didn't announce it alongside a supertele prime. Seems like every pro with an opinion on the subject wants the same thing: big lenses.

@rrccad - I don't see how DO really effects anything. It's not going to make cameras any faster or better. Besides, if you're talking about buying all new DO Canon lenses, and maybe replacing old, worn-out Canon bodies, then many people might consider it a good opportunity to switch over to Sony at that time, since the money is going to be spent anyways!

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:38 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: I like my J5 with 6-13VR and 32 1.2. No other camera with 1'' sensor allows for such freedom of creative choice in such a tiny package as Nikon 1. Nikon literally has no competition in this segment. All other brands only offer fixed lens options. Too bad Nikon doesn't see it as an opportunity to offer something unique. Kind of like that salesman who thought that there was no market for a shoe company in a courtly where everyone walks barefoot. Sometimes all that's needed is to show the alternative to create the market.

@photoguy622- That may be true, may be not. But the sensor they sit in front of is tiny. Too tiny for many people to want to invest in a system for it. And those lenses aren't cheap either. $996.95 for a Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6? Come on! Regardless of what kind of sensor sits behind it, it's still a slow variable-aperture 70-300 zoom. And to get some real speed for shallower depth of field off of such a tiny sensor, you're looking at $896.95 for a Nikon 1 NIKKOR 32mm f/1.2. Plus, you'd think that for the price of these Nikon 1 bodies with such smaller sensors, you'd at least get IBIS. Not so.

If the market can support it, great! I like diversity in the market. But for the price that Nikon is charging for it, I can see how it would be a tough sell for a lot of people. I hope it survives. But sadly, it's a tough market.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:30 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: I like my J5 with 6-13VR and 32 1.2. No other camera with 1'' sensor allows for such freedom of creative choice in such a tiny package as Nikon 1. Nikon literally has no competition in this segment. All other brands only offer fixed lens options. Too bad Nikon doesn't see it as an opportunity to offer something unique. Kind of like that salesman who thought that there was no market for a shoe company in a courtly where everyone walks barefoot. Sometimes all that's needed is to show the alternative to create the market.

Maybe there's a reason why they don't have any competition in the 1" MILC market: it's because no one wants to be in that market. Not enough consumers interested in investing in a camera system that uses such a tiny sensor.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 12:21 UTC
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