T3

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Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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Total: 2833, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

The Aussie Viking: For all the criticism, perhaps we should be grateful of the digital age for once. In the old day a fault would have to be massive to cause a product recall, with down-time, and postage to fix, and almost never happened. We would be expected to go the way of a work-around of buying a new product.
Now we can download a patch, flash it at home, and be on our way in under 5 minutes. Yet people complain still.
I think Microsoft set the standard in this, doing regular bug fixes (and when code is that large, to expect not a single error/program clash is unrealistic), at no cost, even a decade after the product was first released. Other Companies want subscription based services to keep milking you over time.
From my 40D onwards I have done progressive patches as they have been released, and never been let down. That's five bodies and several update's with no complaints.

@alolog - Not quite right. For one thing, back in the film days there wasn't much to address with firmware updates (even if it did exist back then) because cameras simply didn't do that much compare to today's cameras. They had a small fraction of the capabilities and features that today's cameras have. Secondly, you say "In the film age manufacture knew they had to get it right first time and they did in most cases." Well, that's the same today: manufacturers get it right the first time "in most cases." Most of today's cameras are perfectly fine without firmware updates. But firmware updates generally fix minor issues that most people don't even notice (and would have been left unnoticed back in the film days). Sometimes firmware also updates or improves compatibility/performance with new lenses that didn't even exist when the camera was made. How do you "get it right" for something that didn't even exist at the time the camera, and it's firmware, was being designed?

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 16:23 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

zavart: I have a strange feeling that all these comparisons of Sony a9 to Canon or Nikon SLR are akin to comparing first LCD monitors to CRT monitors. Yes, sure at first LCD were inferior but the problem for CRT was that LCD technology had all the future, evolution and time in front of them while for CRT this was really the end of the line :(

@Sacher Khoudari - You start off talking about manufacturing costs, but then switch to R&D costs. Two different things. I'm only talking about manufacturing costs. DSLRs require many more parts. For example, here's the chassis of a Canon 7D-- *just* the chassis pieces. It's comprised of 10 parts.
https://goo.gl/5o1ZCN

Here's the chassis of an A9. It's comprised of only four parts.
https://goo.gl/XVdh0K
When a manufacturing specialist looks at each of these parts, he sees dollar signs ($) because every one of these parts has $ associated with: manufacturing it, storing it, moving it, assembling it-- all cost $. When you can go from 10 parts down to 4 parts, that's a $ savings. If you're in manufacturing, you know what I mean. And we're not even counting all the other components that a DSLR needs, such as a complicated reflex mirror system:
https://goo.gl/Arw4Ao
Or AF modules with a dozen tiny pieces:
https://goo.gl/F4Efp6
And much more. Every piece has a cost ($) associated with it.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:23 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tatouzou: DSLR are a mature technology, which inheritated SLR technology from the film era.
With digital sensor replacing film, the OVF via a mirror and pentaprism is not needed anymore: its present superiority in high end cameras is only the result of mirrorless not being able to offer equivalent performance.
When mirrorless will prove it can do it, DSLR will become obsolete.

People also tend to forget that a lot of OVFs just aren't all that good. Yes, if you're shooting with a FF camera, you'll get a very big, bright viewfinder. But that's not the case with most APS-C cameras, because on a DSLR the size of the viewfinder is relative to the size of the sensor frame. That's not the case with EVF. An EVF can basically be any size you want it to be. That's why cameras such as the X-T1 (APS-C) and E-M1 (m4/3) can have viewfinders as large and bright as a 1DX (FF).

http://www.onfoto.ru/review/images/Fujifilm-X-T1/views/Fujifilm-X-T1-EVF-size.jpg

And the illumination/brightness of an EVF is not dependent on the size of the sensor format, or even the amount of ambient lighting, like an OVF is.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 19:40 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

zavart: I have a strange feeling that all these comparisons of Sony a9 to Canon or Nikon SLR are akin to comparing first LCD monitors to CRT monitors. Yes, sure at first LCD were inferior but the problem for CRT was that LCD technology had all the future, evolution and time in front of them while for CRT this was really the end of the line :(

@Sacher Khoudari - CanoNikon are in a tough position. DSLRs are inherently more expensive to produce, and they depend on economies of scale to keep those manufacturing costs down. But DSLR sales have declined significantly over the past few years, reducing their economies of scale. And if CanoNIkon were to jump more seriously into mirrorless, they would hasten the declining sales of their DSLRs, further reducing their economies of scale. I can see why they are so reluctant to give any boost to the mirrorless market. It's a "damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don't" situation for them.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 18:57 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

Esstee: Wow, this camera is a bonafied money shot machine!

@pkcpga - But I'm pretty sure these things can be improved with firmware updates. Keep in mind, this is basically first generation for Sony, their first crack at a flagship action camera, and it's a damned good one. The slight front-focusing of its predictive tracking algorithm can definitely be tweaked. It's not a hardware issue, like front/back-focusing in DSLRs that require micro-adjust lens calibration.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 18:49 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

J A C S: Imagine how outdated this camera will look like when the A9II gets released with 40fps...

LOL, I think the A9 is all the camera I will ever need, regardless of what improvements future cameras might deliver.

But if a firmware update came out that would enable sensor-shift (pixel shift) stitching, I'll take that.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 18:42 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

zavart: I have a strange feeling that all these comparisons of Sony a9 to Canon or Nikon SLR are akin to comparing first LCD monitors to CRT monitors. Yes, sure at first LCD were inferior but the problem for CRT was that LCD technology had all the future, evolution and time in front of them while for CRT this was really the end of the line :(

Yes, good point. The other apt consideration is cost. Fewer parts and more simplified construction means lower cost. LCD monitors are ridiculously inexpensive now, thanks to that. The same goes for HDTVs. Today's HDTV's are barely more than sheets of glass in a frame. And thanks to that, they are also ridiculously inexpensive too. I don't expect mirrorless cameras to end up being "ridiculously inexpensive", but they do have fewer parts and less complicated assembly, which will result in a cost advantage for them.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 18:21 UTC
On article Alpha-better: Sony a9 versus a7R II (507 comments in total)
In reply to:

SirSeth: I think the A9 is the most refined mirrorless camera they have ever produced. The last hurdles were AF tracking, battery life, and redundancy to really tempt people way from a DSLR imo. Little refinements like the My Menu, joy stick, and touch screen really fill out the offering. Now as they plug holes in the lens catalog for wildlife/sports there really is little a mirrorless camera can't do while offering some significant strengths over DSLRs. Very curious to see which technologies Sony will let trickle down to their lower cost options. I'd love the battery, card slots, joy stick, and some of the AF capability in an A7III--maybe with half the speed and buffer of the A9.

I'm hoping that Sony makes that new battery standard throughout the line, except for the lowest-level Sony mirrorless bodies (A5000, A5100). Yes, users of the current smaller batteries may not like it, but it'll be a small and short-lived issue. As a Canon DSLR user, I remember when Canon went from their BP-511 battery to the larger-capacity LP-E6N. It was no big deal.

Also, Sony's recently introduced NPA-MQZ1K Multi-Battery Adaptor Kit has a "dummy battery" that slots into where the regular battery goes in, and it's designed to fit both the A9's battery slot as well as all of Sony's other mirrorless cameras that use the smaller NP-FW50 battery by using a removable outer shell (to change the size of the battery):

https://goo.gl/j2N6xl

Sony could do that if they made all future bodies use the A9's larger NP-FZ100 battery: just offer the outer shell from the Multi-Battery Adaptor Kit so users can still use their smaller NP-FW50 batteries with newer bodies!

Do it, Sony!

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 18:12 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1179 comments in total)
In reply to:

zodiacfml: Just for fun, how does AF compare to a Nikon V3?

Just imagine if Nikon took all the tech in the V3 and upscaled it to APS-C and FF. I think that would be quite nice. And I think it's only a matter of time that they do that, if they aren't working on it as we speak.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 16:49 UTC
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

tedolf: I have no idea who would want to loot at images from a 360 degree camera. People don't see the world like that normally. What is the use of such a thing?

tedolph

It'll be important as VR (virtual reality) becomes more popular. Put on a headset and the image is all around you.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 21:36 UTC
In reply to:

ariot: Aside from professionals who must have a quiet camera, the target market for this camera is not the professional shooter.

This is a consumer model familiar to the car companies. They make huge mark-ups selling vehicles with capabilities rarely used to people who don't really need them but want them.

Sure it is a great camera, yes. Maybe some need it, yes. But you go broke selling to need, you have to sell to a WANT.

Sports and wildlife pros are not the target demo. Most of the hot PJs who are making waves and haven't gotten sponsored yet are shooting with 5 year old cameras and lenses.

This is for consumers who want specs, that's who makes your executives wealthy. Same as it ever was.

@MyReality - "This still makes it a costly proposition to switch systems."

Let's not forget that there are new buyers entering the market every day. I think system switchers are only one small piece of the picture. Sony is also going after entirely new customers, saying "Hey, instead of going that direction (towards DSLR), come this way (Sony mirrorless) instead." That's basically how Canon came to dominance. Yes, getting people to switch from Nikon was one piece of the picture. But it was the gradual selling to new customers that gained Canon the ground that they did. Sony will work to do the same.

Also, let's not forget that Canon's 24-70 and 70-200 work well when adapted to Sony bodies. You're not going to get fancier Sony features such as Face Detection AF, but Canon bodies didn't have that feature anyways (not in the viewfinder). But IBIS continues to work just fine.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 05:49 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

stratplaya: Nice, but nothing ground breaking or "powerhouse" like about them.

@Vik2012 - I think you are greatly over-estimating the degree to which people are waltzing around in the rain for extended periods of time doing photography, hahaha! The existing A9 sealing should easily be able to handle the excessive moisture that the average user would endure. This is more of a silly p!ssing match, kind of like "mine is bigger than yours", except for weather resistance. Last year I was caught outside in a monsoon rain with my A6000 in Sri Lanka. Trust me, the photographic opportunities are not that great in a downpour. But my A6000 and Sony 18-105 survived just fine with just a moderate amount of shielding. What stopped me wasn't the camera malfunctioning; it was water droplets getting on the front element of the camera, and the dirth of photographic opportunities in a downpour. It's not exactly something that is a great experience, regardless of how weather-resistant your camera is.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 22:48 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

mailman88: Ok Canon....you can beat the a9, with the future new 7mkIII at half the price.

@Vik2012 - Unfortunately, I think it might be you who is worshipping at the alter of flipping mirrors, which is why you seem to think that mirrors without them are sacrilege. Listen, I use both DSLRs and mirrorless. Side by side. For a couple years now. I've come to the conclusion that we're reaching a point that I don't need a flipping mirror or OVF anymore. Ever. I don't miss it. But it's because I don't worship OVFs or flipping mirrors on any level. No nostalgia for them. Today's, and tomorrows, EVFs do just as well or better, with more features and capabilities. And less noise (no mirror slap).

I honestly think it's an inevitability-- the rise of mirrorless over DSLR. People like yourself don't see it coming. But in 10 or 20 years, you'll look back and say, "Geez, why didn't I see that coming?!" For everyone else, it'll seem quite obvious. Everything is moving towards a more solid-state, less mechanical world.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 22:44 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

mailman88: Ok Canon....you can beat the a9, with the future new 7mkIII at half the price.

@Vik2012 - First of all, cost of manufacturing is definitely a cost that all manufacturers care deeply about. I've been in manufacturing. I know. But the other factor is that these additional costs get passed on to the consumer. Right now, we have a lot of people of a particular generation that still love the optical viewfinder and flapping mirror. And they are willing to pay a few hundred dollars more for it. That may not necessarily be the case with future generations who have no love for OVFs and flapping mirrors.

Times change, attitudes change, new buyers enter the market replacing old buyers. Think of the older generation that couldn't stand the idea of not having a physical keyboard on a phone. Think of the older generation that scoffed at using phones for photography. My point is that the curmudgeons and oldsters don't determine where things go in the future. Their default position is typically to resist such changes. Usually unsuccessfully.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 22:14 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

stratplaya: Nice, but nothing ground breaking or "powerhouse" like about them.

@Vik2012 - People are grasping at straws when they say that a camera that does have weather sealing does not. I would be perfectly comfortable shooting with the A9 in a moderate amount of rain, as I already do with my A6000 (which has survived just fine). In more intense rain, I would throw a rain cover on it, just like most pro photographers already do! So ultimately, I think it's really an overblown issue by some people who are grasping at straws, blowing things out of proportion. Go to any rainy sporting event where there are pro photographers working, and you'll see rain covers everywhere.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 22:00 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

mailman88: Ok Canon....you can beat the a9, with the future new 7mkIII at half the price.

Cost is increasingly going to be a factor for DSLRs against mirrorless cameras. For example, Sony already has the A6300 that does 11fps, with 425 AF points, with 4K, with face/eye detection AF, with WiFI, in a weather-sealed magnesium body, all for less than $1,000 ($948). In comparison, the 7D MKII is $1,350. The material costs on a 7D MKII are just higher. More parts, more complicated to manufacture.

Plus, I don't think it's going to get any better with time, for DSLRs. As time goes by, and mirrorless gains greater acceptance, economies of scale will increasingly benefit mirrorless cameras. People who've grown up with OVFs (and who can't seem to live without them) will be replaced by a younger generation that has grown up looking at electronic screens all their lives.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 21:47 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

Vik2012: Therein lies the danger in overhyping something. I was expecting something extraordinary to follow. Maybe someone will explain how this camera redefines photography based on the shots taken with it rather than the engineering details.

The A9 a nice camera, no doubt. However, articles on migrating from the best Canon, Nikon or other gear over to it, seem a bit hasty.

@5prism - I was referring to the potential $ cost of IBIS if it were to be added to the 1DXII/D5, versus the A9 which is much less expensive and already has IBIS. It was a comment regarding competing on cost (mirrorless vs DSLR), not about whether 5prism needs IBIS, LOL.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 21:01 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

stratplaya: Nice, but nothing ground breaking or "powerhouse" like about them.

@Vik2012 - first of all, the A9 does have weather seals.
https://goo.gl/EBgndu

Secondly, even sports shooters with gear that is heavily weather sealed still throw on rain covers over their gear.
https://goo.gl/e3r96I
https://goo.gl/1gFV8i
https://goo.gl/EeqIz9
https://goo.gl/G9PwlE

And that goes for broadcast video cameras, too, that also have to shoot in the rain.
https://goo.gl/nXdG3O
https://goo.gl/PtAWpQ

People are making waaaaay too big a deal about this. It's not the life-and-death issue that some people are making it out to be. Yes, the A9 has seals. Yes, pros use rain covers, even with heavily sealed gear.

I think people are just desperately grasping at straws.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 20:53 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

Vik2012: Therein lies the danger in overhyping something. I was expecting something extraordinary to follow. Maybe someone will explain how this camera redefines photography based on the shots taken with it rather than the engineering details.

The A9 a nice camera, no doubt. However, articles on migrating from the best Canon, Nikon or other gear over to it, seem a bit hasty.

Well, for one thing, cameras like the A9 show that these very high levels of performance can be done more cheaply with solid state technology. $4500 for an A9. $6000 for a 1DX II. $6500 for a D5. And the 1DX II/D5 don't even have IBIS, which would make them even mor expensive. In the long run, I think it will be difficult for DSLRs to compete on cost with solid state mirrorless cameras that use far fewer parts and are less complicated to manufacture -- especially as mirrorless cameras gain economies of scale.

Also, let's forget about "migrating" for a moment. Just think of the next generation of photographers who will be entering the market with no pre-existing equipment and no prior loyalties, and who have grown up looking at digital screens all their lives. It's that next generation of users who will determine the makeup of camera market share.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 20:11 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1179 comments in total)
In reply to:

KLO82: It seems to me that there is huge difference in philosophies between Canon and Sony regarding their imaging products.

In Canon's view, all the problems/ limitations in photography have already been solved, the technology is matured. There is no need for anything revolutionary. Just fine tune/ slightly modify your existing products and reiterate them - and ensure the reliability of the products. If you still can not get your intended photographs with the current products (cameras and lenses), may be the limitation is you.

Whereas in Sony's view, there are still many more limitations/ problems to overcome in imaging - there is much to be done.

Eventually, we will see who's view is closer to reality.

@Slideshow Bob - it just goes to show what happens when you drag your feet and ignore the potential of new technologies. If Nikon never did anything with it, it doesn't really matter much if they happened to have it first. Let's not forget that Kodak was in the forefront of digital photography. But look what they ended up doing with it: nothing, until it was too late. I guess we can say the same of Nikon with in-lens motors and VR. Instead, another company (Canon) took that technology and ran with it, while Nikon sat on their thumbs. If these companies aren't careful, it might happen again!

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 18:57 UTC
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