T3

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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Total: 3471, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Nikonmaniac0620: Sony's trying to dish out as many A9's as they can before the ULTIMATE DSLR hits the market - D850. Once that's out it's the end of Sony.

@panchorancho - Geez, Nikon users sound more insecure and desperate with every passing year. Sony isn't going away. I think Nikon users desperately wish Sony would go away. But that isn't going to happen. Frankly, I think we should all be happy that there is more competition! I'm a Canon user, but I welcome Sony as a strong competitor, just as I welcome Nikon as a strong competitor. I don't want any of them going away. I want all of them to strive to eat one another's lunch.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 07:52 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: That means Sony overpriced their cameras by, at least, $500.
So stupid to buy their products at their listed prices.

@Edmond Leung - You are right, the C300 MKII qualifies as super overpriced. When it was first introduced, it was considered overpriced. When Canon knocked a whopping $4000 off the price of the C300 MKII, those suspicions were confirmed. When Canon knocked an additional $2000 off, those suspicions were doubly confirmed. The C300 MKII wasn't selling well for the outrageous price that Canon was asking for it, so they had to cut the price not just once, but twice. Prices are what the market will bear. If the market can bear a higher price, companies will keep those higher prices. That obviously wasn't the case with the C300 MKII, hence the two huge price cuts.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 05:39 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: That means Sony overpriced their cameras by, at least, $500.
So stupid to buy their products at their listed prices.

They all do it. Remember when Canon lowered the price of the C300 MKII by $6000? Canon originally dropped the price by $4000, then dropped the price again by another $2000!

https://www.cinema5d.com/4000-canon-c300-mark-ii-price-drop-1500-off-c100-mark-ii/

https://www.cinema5d.com/canon-drops-canon-c300-mark-ii-price-10k/

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 02:38 UTC
In reply to:

Nikonmaniac0620: Sony's trying to dish out as many A9's as they can before the ULTIMATE DSLR hits the market - D850. Once that's out it's the end of Sony.

The A9 and D850 are two very different cameras. The A9 is a 24mp camera that shoots at 20fps. The D850 is a 46mp camera that shoots at 7fps. The A9 competes with the 1DX II and D5. A more appropriate comparison to the D850 would be the A7R II, or the next A7R III.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 02:29 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: The point of ILC is right there in the name: interchangeable lenses. A phone doesn't have that. You might get a semi-good-looking blurry background impersonating a portrait lens but you won't get a 300mm or whatever equivalent which is present in the cheapest possible 55-200mm (APS-C) zoom.

And then there's the controls and ergonomics. Say what you want but a flat, large plate with almost no buttons is a horrible piece of equipment for photography.

I still much prefer even the derided Nikon 1 system to any phone, no matter how good the photos might come out. Yes I don't always have it with me which is a shame. But when I do, the difference in enjoyment of photography is massive.

Obviously, standalone cameras are old-fashioned and definitely need progress and evolution to keep up. But an ILC is still an ILC.

@dgumshu - Well, given the overwhelming popularity of smartphones and smartphone photography these days, you are definitely in the minority.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 01:47 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: The point of ILC is right there in the name: interchangeable lenses. A phone doesn't have that. You might get a semi-good-looking blurry background impersonating a portrait lens but you won't get a 300mm or whatever equivalent which is present in the cheapest possible 55-200mm (APS-C) zoom.

And then there's the controls and ergonomics. Say what you want but a flat, large plate with almost no buttons is a horrible piece of equipment for photography.

I still much prefer even the derided Nikon 1 system to any phone, no matter how good the photos might come out. Yes I don't always have it with me which is a shame. But when I do, the difference in enjoyment of photography is massive.

Obviously, standalone cameras are old-fashioned and definitely need progress and evolution to keep up. But an ILC is still an ILC.

@dgumshu - The average consumer might say that they don't want to fumble around with the "confusing" controls of an ILC. We forum members take it for granted, but the average consumer finds ILC cameras confusing and intimidating.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 00:48 UTC
In reply to:

Quantum Scientist: Another unfortunate incident proving there is no such thing as free speech in the USA anymore, just like the Google engineer firing incident.

@Quantum Scientist - "free speech" has always had limitations. Everything has limits. Your idea of living in a society and world that has no limits on behavior is not realistic. It's pure fantasy. There are always limits on behavior. Speech is behavior. If you want to live in a cave, off the grid away from people, then you don't have to conform to the rules of society, and you can ignore these limitations.

Your notion that "free speech" is an "all or nothing" things is ridiculous. Free speech with limitations is still free speech and is perfectly reasonable. For example, you can't shout "fire" in a crowded theatre. In 1919, in the case Schenck v. United States, the Court ruled unanimously that the First Amendment, though it protects freedom of expression, does not protect dangerous speech (like shouting "fire" in a crowded theatre). That's an example of a limitation, but that limitation doesn't mean we have no free speech! So to say "we have free speech or we don't" is just absurd.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 06:15 UTC
In reply to:

rashoop: Glad that Galen Rowell wasn't an ultralight-er. Neither am I, though I can certainly appreciate the light-first approach.
A few extra pounds to bring my dream kit, including a tripod for low-light ultimate landscapes, is the reason I head to the high-country. Nothing extreme is important. Taking it all in is the reason I put an acceptably heavy pack on my back.
That all said, some tremendous images with your Oly. Looks like it was a good year for your journey. Thanks for sharing!

Why are you "glad"? Galen Rowell didn't have much choice, as he was a 35mm film shooter who died in 2002. He shot IS0 50 Velvia film. A far cry from what cameras can achieve today. Back then, landscape shooters like Rowell had far more limited options. It was Velvia...or Velvia. You could shoot at ISO 50, or at ISO 40. LOL. I remember those days.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 05:22 UTC
In reply to:

Everythingis1: Or you could use a Full Frame Sony A7 with 24-70 F4 lens which weight about the same, and have much higher picture quality...

@String - The A7 hasn't been replaced. It's still in production. It's Sony's entry-level FF mirrorless camera. Think of it as the equivalent of Canon's Rebel, but for Sony FF mirrorless.

Sony just happens to move fast and iterate quickly. The A7 was introduced October 2013. The A7 II was introduced November 2014. They don't wait 5 years between models like some companies. And they've kept both models in their line-up, at two different price points.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2017 at 23:27 UTC
In reply to:

Everythingis1: Or you could use a Full Frame Sony A7 with 24-70 F4 lens which weight about the same, and have much higher picture quality...

@Thorgrem - What in the world are you talking about? I've traveled all over the world with an A6000. I experience no such frustration. Meanwhile, my Canon DSLR gear sits at home. I can shoot with it just as smoothly and quickly as my Canon DSLRs.

On the A7, there are four physical dials for your essential camera controls: front and rear dials, exposure compensation dial, and an additional rear dial which surrounds the four-way controller. Nothing sluggish about it. As for startup time, is that really an issue for landscape photography? And where else can you buy a new FF ILC for less than $1000 that is smaller and lighter than a Canon Rebel T6? That's why the A7 makes a great hiking/landscape camera! I started using an A6000 for travel because it's so much more compact, lighter, and more enjoyable to carry than my Canon DSLR gear. And now, it's what I use 90% of the time, even at home.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2017 at 21:08 UTC
In reply to:

Everythingis1: Or you could use a Full Frame Sony A7 with 24-70 F4 lens which weight about the same, and have much higher picture quality...

@Thorgrem - "To bad the A7 is ridiculously slow"

Oh, yeah, you totally need a fast camera for landscape photography! Absolutely essential for AF tracking those fast-moving mountains and trees!

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2017 at 20:24 UTC
In reply to:

Quantum Scientist: Another unfortunate incident proving there is no such thing as free speech in the USA anymore, just like the Google engineer firing incident.

@Tom Holly - Why is it terrible? Companies have every right to set a certain standard for their workplace through codes of conduct and standards. If you go around saying that women are biologically inferior and the company is a cult, yeah you might get fired! That's freedom in action: you're free to say whatever you want, and a company is free to fire your ass for breaking their codes of conduct! That's the way it should be. What's worse is when companies are heavily unionized to the point that you can't fire an employee no matter what they do or say! Then you have that "problem employee" that everyone hates, but no one can get rid of! Yeah, you should be able to say whatever you want; but in society you should also face the consequences. No one is getting thrown in jail here for saying deplorable things. The government ensures that much freedom of speech. But a company also has the freedom to terminate your employment if they decide you don't fit in.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2017 at 15:04 UTC
In reply to:

Quantum Scientist: Another unfortunate incident proving there is no such thing as free speech in the USA anymore, just like the Google engineer firing incident.

I don't think you understand what "free speech" is. Free speech is not a limitless thing in society. Common limitations to freedom of speech relate to libel, slander, obscenity, pornography, sedition, incitement, fighting words, classified information, copyright violation, trade secrets, non-disclosure agreements, the right to privacy, the right to be forgotten, public security, and perjury, etc. Likewise, if "free speech" in the workplace becomes sexual harassment, the employer can certainly take action against such speech. Also, if I curse at my boss and hurl insults at him to his face, he might fire me. But I'm not going to blame that on the idea that "there is no such thing as free speech in the USA anymore."

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2017 at 06:38 UTC
On article Canon EOS 6D Mark II Review (1043 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Ma: A camera that no one should buy, according to the comments. Yet, out of stock at Amazon. How does this happen every time?

@Scorehound_ca - Well, yes, of course. Because the DSLR market is basically a two-horse race between Canon and Nikon, and it's been like that for the entire existence of the DSLR market. So no surprise there.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2017 at 05:46 UTC
On article Canon EOS 6D Mark II Review (1043 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Ma: A camera that no one should buy, according to the comments. Yet, out of stock at Amazon. How does this happen every time?

Seems pretty suspicious, because on Amazon's "Best Sellers in Mirrorless Cameras" rankings, the 6D MKII is at #51 in sales, which is pretty weak.

https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Electronics-DSLR-Cameras/zgbs/electronics/3017941/ref=zg_bs_nav_e_4_12556502011#3

I think Canon is trying to create artificial scarcity to hype up the camera.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2017 at 04:15 UTC
In reply to:

cjones63: Most people use few of the features on any camera just like most people never drive their corvette at top speed, test its cornering ability or that four wheel drive cars and trucks ever leave the pavement. It's about the perception and the misguided notion that, "I have it if I need it" and the "Badge" the model represents al la Rolex etc. Many brag about a 10fps body but only shoot birds perched at a bird feeder, extoll the virtues of hundreds of focus points but mostly photograph test patterns, beg for 50MP sensors yet most images are never seen nor printed. Once these users realize that the latest and greatest cameras have made them no better they then blame the lens. The cycle continues when the next model is released and yet again, temporary euphoria is achieved and profits are made by the manufacturer. Yes, the camera companies know all about this.

Guys, this is a very common argument: "if my brand doesn't have XYZ feature or capability, it's not needed!" For example, I still remember the discussions here at dpreview pre-2007 by Nikon users regarding FF. Up until 2007, Nikon did not have a FF DSLR, while Canon had had a FF DSLR since 2002. During those years, Nikon users aggressively argued that FF was not needed, FF was a dead format, APS-C was the future, and Nikon was right to leave FF behind. I remember lengthy arguments against FF by Nikon users. It was just a clear example of "my brand doesn't have it, therefore it's not needed and we don't want it." But when Nikon introduced the FF D3 in August 2007, those arguments immediately evaporated.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 14:24 UTC
In reply to:

cjones63: Most people use few of the features on any camera just like most people never drive their corvette at top speed, test its cornering ability or that four wheel drive cars and trucks ever leave the pavement. It's about the perception and the misguided notion that, "I have it if I need it" and the "Badge" the model represents al la Rolex etc. Many brag about a 10fps body but only shoot birds perched at a bird feeder, extoll the virtues of hundreds of focus points but mostly photograph test patterns, beg for 50MP sensors yet most images are never seen nor printed. Once these users realize that the latest and greatest cameras have made them no better they then blame the lens. The cycle continues when the next model is released and yet again, temporary euphoria is achieved and profits are made by the manufacturer. Yes, the camera companies know all about this.

"Many brag about a 10fps body but only shoot birds perched at a bird feeder, extoll the virtues of hundreds of focus points but mostly photograph test patterns"

I think you're a little out of touch there, buddy. For example, with your focus point comment, you have it backwards. Most people will *never* photograph test patterns, but they'll make use of the number of the focus points their camera has every time they half-press the shutter button! As for shooting birds, that's exactly when I switch to 11fps mode on my camera. Before I bought my A6000, which has 179 AF points and 11fps, I too might have been one of those people who would have said, "People never use these things." But the reality is that I use them all the time. I just never used these things before because my previous cameras never had them! Sure, I may not use 11fps for every shot, but I literally benefit from the huge AF point coverage of my camera every time I use AF.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 14:40 UTC
In reply to:

weathersealed: When Canon and Nikon bring out newer versions of their model # they make some improvements. Nikon has the 3000-5000-7000-semi-pro line up and its easier to see the whole line up getting better no matter the price range or user targets. Canon does this too, but Sony with the A6000 series has made no improvements to the 6000 or 6300 and I bet they don't ever, so this does seem more like a successive and not set line up where the users will have to wonder what comes next. I think some day they will just drop the older models and not update them.

@weathersealed - "They haven't done anything yet to a 5 years old version and I will say they never will on that model either."

Clearly. you have no idea what you're talking about. The oldest A6XXX model is the A6000 which was introduced February 2014. That makes it only 3.5 years old. It's not a "5 years old version." You really should get your dates and timeline correct before whining that they haven't done anything to a "5 years old" camera that isn't 5 years old!

At any rate, Sony is certainly not abandoning their APS-C mirrorless cameras. There certainly will be replacements and updates to all these models to cover a wide range of needs at a wide range of price points-- i.e., product segmentation.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 05:24 UTC
In reply to:

M H S: I actually think Canon slotted the 6d perfectly, from a marketing perspective. I am a very happy 6d owner thinking of upgrading soon (camera is 5 years old). I was all ready to buy a 6d-ii...but am now strongly considering a 5d-iv.

people upgrading to FF will love the 6d-ii, just like I love my mach-i.. . and in a few years they will recognize some limitations, and upgrade.

I don't really understand why people here think these companies should operate as charities.

"i just don't see why people get so upset about a product that isn't perfect for them."

I think people are right to set some reasonable expectations, and to voice dissatisfaction if they find a product to be lacking. Better DR, wider AF point spread, and 4K in a $2000 camera in 2017 are all pretty reasonable expectations. It's not really about expecting a product to be "perfect." You also have to keep in mind that the 6D II probably won't be replaced for another 5 years. If you are going to spend $2000 for a camera, you want one that is at least a bit future-proof, not just one that is a minor improvement or one that already seems a bit underwhelming already. At a certain point, people feel like they are being taken for a ride. This is why it's important for us consumers to express our dissatisfaction with our wallets, rather than rewarding such complacency or intentional feature omissions.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 04:57 UTC
In reply to:

M H S: I actually think Canon slotted the 6d perfectly, from a marketing perspective. I am a very happy 6d owner thinking of upgrading soon (camera is 5 years old). I was all ready to buy a 6d-ii...but am now strongly considering a 5d-iv.

people upgrading to FF will love the 6d-ii, just like I love my mach-i.. . and in a few years they will recognize some limitations, and upgrade.

I don't really understand why people here think these companies should operate as charities.

This is a strategy that might have been "perfect" a few years ago, before the existence of FF competitors such as Sony's FF mirrorless cameras (that can, by the way, also use Canon lenses). These days, people have more options. Canon still seems to be operating as if the market has not changed since they introduced the 6D MK1. At the very least, the 6D MKII seems overpriced for what you get. I don't think Canon can any longer assume that people will buy whatever they put out, no matter what the specs or the price. But it still seems like Canon is operating under the assumption that "users will never leave us." I think that assumption is going to be proved increasingly shortsighted and complacent. I'm a Canon user, and like you I too find the 6DII lacking. But unlike you, I'm not looking to a 5D MKIV. I'm looking to see what the Sony A7 III will offer instead (supposedly, 4K, IBIS, the A9's AF system, a joystick, silent electronic shutter, etc). Like I said, we have more option now.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 22:46 UTC
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