petreluk

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Joined on Apr 13, 2009

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A bad photographer who thinks they’re good may be much more successful through sheer chutzpah than a good photographer who thinks they’re bad and lacks the confidence to put it out there.

And in unscrupulous hands Dunning-Kruger could be a great tool for promoting a sense of insecurity in those looking for an edge over the pack, which can lead to ... more purchases of gear. So, alas, it may also be the capitalist’s best friend. Perhaps it’s not all quite so straightforward.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2018 at 21:31 UTC as 56th comment

Future cameras will be decided by the new middle classes of Asia and by the young. Their tastes will dictate where companies spend the R&D funds. The rest is hot air.

Last night I watched an excellent documentary on the life and work of the great Magnum photographer David Hurn. He was filmed quite happily using both DSLRs and mirrorless cameras without once commenting on either. At the tender age of 83, his open-minded approach to life and photography is a standing rebuke to 99 per cent of the nonsense about this non-issue posted on here.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2018 at 08:45 UTC as 90th comment

Most people must look on baffled by DSLR vs mirrorless. It’s about as important as Diet Coke vs Diet Pepsi. Get something you really really like and shoot what you love. The rest is a maelstrom of talk, talk and more talk. Great images come from silence,

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 19:00 UTC as 231st comment | 6 replies

A pleasant interview which shows the brand in a sympathetic light. It’s interesting that in these replies a fair number of people are more engaged by things like the GR (especially) or the K-01 than by the traditonal mainstream items.

I’m also interested in the suggestion that in the future a super-high-res 360 Theta shot could be sliced to create decent part-images of more interest to conventional photography. One can see the application of that in real estate presentations and the like: one capture of the scene which can be re-presented in any way you like at good quality.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2018 at 15:12 UTC as 17th comment | 5 replies

These comments are an echo chamber in which people make grandiose claims for the future largely in order to confirm their own tastes or justify past buying decisions. In fact the market will decide in its own way and in its own time. However, it must be very clear by now that mirrorless cameras occupy a substantial space in the camera world and will continue to do so. If Canon and Nikon pile in it may increase further, too, but DSLRs will be still be around and will still be very good for a long while to come. A single CIPA data point really doesn’t tell us anything much.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 10:01 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

badi: "Old manufacturers, like Carl Zeiss, invented many great lenses in the past – and they continue to do so. We would like to do that for the 21st Century."

Beautiful words, and most importantly backed up by facts. Congrats to Sigma for their achievements and their enthusiastic and honest approach.

One missing, and, i think, pretty desired lineup, would be a high quality smaller lens lineup. Really, nobody is doing it in the present (except Fuji with their 23/35/50 F2 lenses: good optics, small and light, good build and weather sealing). And since sigma is not doing fuji lenses, it seems they don't even compete against that :)

These things may easily go in cycles. When technically accomplished but huge and costly lenses have run their course, people will suddenly decide these lenses are too sterile and characterless and will go in search of the quieter, smaller "art" lenses which have been there all along. Articles will begin to appear suggesting that sharpness as the only metric which matters may not be all it's been cranked up to be ...

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2018 at 13:34 UTC
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

badi: "Old manufacturers, like Carl Zeiss, invented many great lenses in the past – and they continue to do so. We would like to do that for the 21st Century."

Beautiful words, and most importantly backed up by facts. Congrats to Sigma for their achievements and their enthusiastic and honest approach.

One missing, and, i think, pretty desired lineup, would be a high quality smaller lens lineup. Really, nobody is doing it in the present (except Fuji with their 23/35/50 F2 lenses: good optics, small and light, good build and weather sealing). And since sigma is not doing fuji lenses, it seems they don't even compete against that :)

Well, there’s Voigtländer albeit manual focus. I agree, though. It’s not just about size, it’s also about a lens with character designed for pleasing rendering rather than sharpness across the whole frame and technical perfection. The Pentax 43mm would be an example too. Those “old” qualities can produce some wonderful images.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2018 at 09:36 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Frankly, Canon's business strategy is the most successful one. Be realistic, the readers here are just the minority of the minority in the global market, will Canon really listen to you? No way! Canon is in the competitive market; they are not doing charity, how come you guys want to take benefits from them but without paying them? Business is business, their focus is still on maximizing their market share and ensure they can achieve the goals for their stock holders. Don't limit your sight only on the developed markets, ask Canon how many pallets of high-end products they shipped to China each year? There is the real big market for them.

@caterpillar Of course Canon are discounting. They have been doing so for a long time now. It's a well-proven tactic and both the build cost of the bodies and their initial pricing is probably chosen with that in mind. And look what this does. It buys marketshare. Marketshare builds mindshare and takes each buyer out of the equation. That buyer is no longer available to be captured by competitors and in time is much more likely to buy another perhaps more expensive Canon camera. The idea is this is all a desperate ploy by people too dim to have heard of Kodak is a tad far-fetched ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 16:15 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Frankly, Canon's business strategy is the most successful one. Be realistic, the readers here are just the minority of the minority in the global market, will Canon really listen to you? No way! Canon is in the competitive market; they are not doing charity, how come you guys want to take benefits from them but without paying them? Business is business, their focus is still on maximizing their market share and ensure they can achieve the goals for their stock holders. Don't limit your sight only on the developed markets, ask Canon how many pallets of high-end products they shipped to China each year? There is the real big market for them.

Canon's present position has nothing to do with Kodak. Drawing the parallel is a wild exaggeration and hoping it may be true won't make it so. If any of the larger companies is facing trouble, it is Nikon anyway. And the M series cameras are precisely where the sales are going to be, in fact - in Asia. Canon will work their way up there, in by far the largest market on the planet, refining and learning as they go. Every user they capture lower down the market is a future customer for more expensive Canon cameras. The focus on high-end FF is myopic.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 14:12 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Frankly, Canon's business strategy is the most successful one. Be realistic, the readers here are just the minority of the minority in the global market, will Canon really listen to you? No way! Canon is in the competitive market; they are not doing charity, how come you guys want to take benefits from them but without paying them? Business is business, their focus is still on maximizing their market share and ensure they can achieve the goals for their stock holders. Don't limit your sight only on the developed markets, ask Canon how many pallets of high-end products they shipped to China each year? There is the real big market for them.

Canon aren't going to go bust because a few thousand camera nerds disapprove of them. Canon have plenty of weaknesses but failing to spot the rise of mirrorless cameras is absolutely not one of them. Here they are setting out how they intend to become #1 in the mirrorless sector. They are already doing very well in Asia with the M series - the part of the world where it really matters. Perhaps Canon won't pull it off, but it would be a rash person who bet against them. Canon very clearly have a plan and part of that is understanding that there'll be a long period when mirrorless and DSLR run together.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 13:07 UTC
In reply to:

petreluk: Canon intend to dominate the mirrorless market and here they drop enough hints to suggest how they plan to do it. Canon are the most methodical of all camera companies so there is a good chance they can pull it off, too. Complaints about missing features and general mediocrity are like throwing matchsticks at a rhino. The beast will simply plough on through towards the target: continuing to be the world #1 imaging outfit and never, ever giving up their hold on the high-end professional market.

I agree. The plan seems to be to munch their way up the ladder getting better with every rung.

The mention in the interview of the IDX class means Canon aren't messing around. They've seen something like the Sony A9 and realized the gap is closing but they've also realized that Sony are still some way off from an absolutely rugged, reliable workhorse platform with full professional services behind it, so the requirements are clear. 2020 could be very interesting.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2018 at 15:37 UTC

Canon intend to dominate the mirrorless market and here they drop enough hints to suggest how they plan to do it. Canon are the most methodical of all camera companies so there is a good chance they can pull it off, too. Complaints about missing features and general mediocrity are like throwing matchsticks at a rhino. The beast will simply plough on through towards the target: continuing to be the world #1 imaging outfit and never, ever giving up their hold on the high-end professional market.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2018 at 14:58 UTC as 183rd comment | 4 replies

Canon will come for Sony but perhaps not immediately. They will need time to get things right. But meanwhile they can mop up by selling enormous quantities of their M series cameras at lower points especially in the Asian market knowing that every sale is potentially locking in a future Canon customer of their more costly offerings. Canon have by far the most formidable sales and marketing machine of all the camera companies. It's really not that likely Canon will get this all wrong. But they will be looking at establishing the mirrorless portfolio over a few years, not the few months or weeks many on here seem to expect.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 19:08 UTC as 99th comment
On article Why brand market share shouldn't matter to you (552 comments in total)

For most folks cameras are all just black lumps and much more similar than they are different. Almost any camera will take an excellent picture these days too. So the only two things which really set one apart from another are marketing and features, the two things which keep new buyers rolling on.

Putting aside the world’s only mega-successful camera company which is Apple, that leaves Canon leading on marketing and the Sony crowd (Sony, Fuji, Oly and co) leading on features. Whichever camp manages to combine both most effectively will come out on top - and still be utterly dwarfed by Apple.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2018 at 18:53 UTC as 81st comment

There's a lot of money around in some places and I doubt Leica will have much trouble selling this even if many customers are collectors. For myself, monochrome-only cameras with the colour interpolation removed are under-explored by the digital world and I wish there were more from outfits like Olympus, Fuji, Pentax, etc. If there were a model or two at a more sensible price I would by very tempted. The results I've seen are usually superb, in capable hands.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2018 at 18:20 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On article Pentax K-1 Mark II: What you need to know (460 comments in total)
In reply to:

lingccp: I wish Canon can let me upgrade my 6D to 6DMk2 at $550 ...

The upgrade is quite a good way for people to give Pentax some money. It’s hard otherwise because Pentax don’t have many products and even fewer new ones, so it’s not easy to give them a sub from time to time even if one wants to. For those who plan to keep their K1 for a long time, the upgrade is likely worth it. Not so sure the idea makes sense for those who change cameras more often. We’ll see. It’s too soon to know how the new camera or the upgrade perform in practice and that will have a big influence on potential upgraders.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2018 at 14:41 UTC

Both of these should be excellent lenses. Pentax engineers generally deliver excellent products. They will find a keen following among Pentax’s small but faithful band of users. But oh my, how I wish that just once, even just once, a grand fromage from the corporate owners Ricoh would come out of hiding and tell us what the strategy and mission statement are for the Pentax brand. It’s fading away for lack of clarity and support. Great brand, good kit that will deliver top IQ, but Pentax deserves better than these owners imho.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2017 at 20:18 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1632 comments in total)

The number of people who use traditional PCs and stand-alone programs is in steep decline, so this news is no surprise. It's all moving to mobile and the cloud, like it or not. Behind this, however, lies a serious challenge for the camera companies which are mostly shy of involvement in software. Longer-term, they need to find a solution to better output, and to organizing it, which is not dependent on a substantial "PC tax" when one buys a new camera. Adobe and their little games of lock-in aren't much of a solution either, but for most folks they will have to do for now.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 12:00 UTC as 303rd comment | 6 replies

He sounds like a feisty old guy shooting the breeze, perhaps after a long lunch with electric soup very much on the menu. Right or wrong, I admire his style.

Nikon can make a new mount which accepts both DX and FX lenses and sensors. Which one they start with is up to them. In any case, it's a dance. You want an excellent adapter so folks can use their existing Nikon lenses but you also want enough new pluses in the mix to encourage customers to buy new, made-for-mirrorless lenses too. And more and more of those as time goes by. Without that there's no real income stream and so no future. It's what Sony have done already and Canon are clearly going to do at some stage. There's no real surprise here.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2017 at 16:39 UTC as 59th comment
On article Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Review (598 comments in total)
In reply to:

petreluk: What is the point of this camera?

It needs better integration with mobile OS to make it a true stepping stone from a smartphone, but Olympus don't provide it. The whole beginner thing comes across as marketing shtick. As it stands, a smartphone is a great deal easier and more convenient while a full-on camera model is a great deal more capable and, unlike this new model, is something a user can grow into.

It's about offering a better experience than that available on a 3" screen, about sorting images, landing them on social media, applying VSCO stuff and etc. Offering wifi is a basic start, no more. OI Share is a basic start, no more, and I use it a lot. It a very limited app. And wifi is not the only wireless way either. Imho, camera-makers need to embrace mobile OS and stop offering token solutions.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2017 at 20:38 UTC
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