nachos

Lives in United States AK, United States
Joined on Jun 7, 2003

Comments

Total: 80, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Throwback Thursday: when studio lenses retire (203 comments in total)

I have this lens, still pull it out from time to time. Some purple fringing at 36+mp and the corners aren't so hot, but for many purposes it's just fine.

Since it has a manual aperture, it will work great on any camera with an adapter. It lives on in a travel kit connected to an aging Sony NEX, along with its 24mm cousin. I actually enjoy the process of opening all the way to focus, then stopping down to the desired aperture. Auto-focus/auto-aperture snap snap snapping away is not for me.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2016 at 18:38 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

maxnimo: I had a KODAK DC290 in 1999. It produced 1792 x 1200 images and they were not bad at all - they actually looked better than those from my 35mm film point n shoot Olympus. But they weren't quite as good as those from my friend's Nikon coolpix 950.

That was my first digital camera, cost about $900 if I remember right. For the day, it was excellent. Quirky too, it had an operating system that you could load programs into. I think someone even ported Doom to it!

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 00:35 UTC
In reply to:

Chaitanya S: Floppy disk was media I hated the most back in the day. Notoriously unreliable but catch was the cheap prices of floppy disks.

Camera with CF cards were around at the same time as this - I bought a Kodak DC290 in 1999. I recall thinking the floppy in the Sony's were a strong negative as they were fixed at 1.44 mb in size. CF cards were ever-growing, even though they were more expensive and you needed a dedicated reader.

Sony's market research must've told them to use floppies because most computers had a reader, even though by then floppies were practically obsolete. A poor choice honestly, and it probably cost them some time and market share over the next few years. They even made some cameras with mini-cd recorders! Same thinking it seems...

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 00:30 UTC

From what I gather, Getty acquired BuyEnlarge's collection that contained Highsmith's images. BuyEnlarge was a maker of posters using public domain illustrations/photographs. This is legal to sell much as book publishers sell out of copyright classics by Shakespeare and Charles Dickens.

Also from what I gather, is that Highsmith's images are only pseudo-public domain in that she retains copyright but has given a broad license of use and attribution through a gift to the Library of Congress. So, whoops on Getty/Alamy/whoever...

On a related note I think its kind of dubious charging hundreds of dollars for electronic transfers of public domain images. These images don't incur much storage or transfer expense among the millions they have. Amazon, for example, has free classics for the Kindle. It is legal to charge... but in the words of The Dude... "You're not wrong Walter... you're just an a**hole"

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2016 at 20:01 UTC as 56th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

HSway: Samyang produces some excellent optics. It needs to improve its sample variation record, though, based on common user practice and snap-shot sample variance data provided by lensrentals where among 42 entries Samyang’s performance sits at the very bottom of the group. It’s a shame for the lenses can really be very good. And perhaps this is improving. They also brought AF lenses to the market suggesting they can go beyond what they were known for.

Variation is where lower cost inevitably hurts.

How to reduce variation? Tighter quality control: more time spent testing components, tighter parameters then rejecting components that don't meet those parameters. So yield goes down, time spent manufacturing goes up, and as a result so does cost.

This is why many manufacturers have different lineups at different prices. The highest tier might have the tightest parameters and lowest variation. Components that don't make that cut go in the next lower priced line, and so on.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2016 at 16:19 UTC
On article Zenmuse Z3 is DJI's first aerial zoom camera (53 comments in total)
In reply to:

photo_rb: It's nice to see DJI do this but it is also a shame that one of the big camera makers cannot put out a lightweight camera module in either full frame or C sensor plus a small selection of lightweight lenses.

Full-frame plus "lightweight" lens are somewhat mutually exclusive. The bigger the frame, the more glass required. Given the subject and nature of drone shooting, there's not much of a benefit over a smaller sensor.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 18:59 UTC
On article Zenmuse Z3 is DJI's first aerial zoom camera (53 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photato: Wow, this require some serious stabilization.
Until now all DJI drones have been fitted with super wide angle lenses, about 21mm.
Looking forward to see some footage at the Tele end.
DJI should also enter the Mirrorless market of grounded cameras, to wake the hell up of the Canon and Nikon dinosaurs.

The long end will probably get some jello-cam effect going too, enhancing the 'shaky' nature.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 18:57 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

John _ Finn: Like Richard, I too have recently begun to experiment with video and am enjoying it hugely. I quickly discovered that my photographic tripod head was no good for panning shots - no matter how careful I was, I ended up with juddery footage - and so I bought a Manfrotto MVH502AH fluid head which has made a huge difference. I would have loved to get Adobe Premiere Pro but I could not justify the monthly cost (on top of my sub to Photoshop CC). I figured Elements would be too basic, and so I have opted for Cyberlink's Power Director 14 based on reviews. It seems to be a very comprehensive program and I am tackling the learning curve at the moment.

You can indeed edit in PS CC. And Premiere elements is perfectly fine for most amateur or just-getting-started pros. Less of a technical learning curve so you can spend more time getting the feel for editing.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 01:06 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

cdembrey: Most still photographers tend to be control freaks. They want to do the lighting, operate the camera, pull focus, record the sound and do both sound and picture editing.

It may be hard to believe, but even a beginning sound-recordist with a used ElctroVoice mic, a short boom pole and an iPhone can record butter sound than you can. A camera mounted mic or Zoom recorder just doesn't cut it.

Don't zoom, is not true. You can bury a zoom in a move. Either a pan or a dolly move will work—Hollywood does it, why can't you??

The 180 degree rule isn't. Many movies were shot with the Panavision PSR 200 (Panavision Silent Reflex 200° shutter). Today with Digital Cine cameras they will some time use a 360° shutter in low light.

The list goes on and on.

A gentle zoom can be used instead of a dolly if there's a flat-ish background behind your subject. Much easier and faster to do. Try it on medium-closeups.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 01:01 UTC
On article Under pressure: Canon vs. Nikon in a hydraulic press (295 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: I haven't watch the video (because I am in subway) but don't understand why people would get entertainment or educational value out of it. This is like the guy smashing an iPhone against a large piece of magnet and proclaim iPhone is affected by magnet. There is no value and the act itself makes me feel the producer and reposter are desperately crying for help because they feel their life is equally pointless. Sure there is money and fame but we all know that's not all there is to life.

Canon, what is best in life?

To crush your enemies
See them driven before you,
and to hear the lamentation of their women

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2016 at 00:47 UTC
In reply to:

razadaz: As has been already commented you can only improve a product so much. I get the impression that Adobe is trying to justify its subscription model to existing users. I doubt that any of these additions would make existing owners rush out and take out a subscription.

CreeDo, I never said any such thing. Please re-read what I wrote.

I was replying to the guy above who thinks that Lightroom does "95%" of what people use Photoshop for. The point is, PS is a much more powerful and diverse tool than LR. Sure, some people only need Lightroom, but for many this is simply not the case.

I'm an advertising photographer and retoucher. We don't even use Lightroom, we shoot to Capture One, make some basic adjustments and then retouch in PS. Pretty common workflow at this level. The idea of trying to do that work with Lightroom or C1's tools is painful to think about.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 23:01 UTC
In reply to:

razadaz: As has been already commented you can only improve a product so much. I get the impression that Adobe is trying to justify its subscription model to existing users. I doubt that any of these additions would make existing owners rush out and take out a subscription.

The photoshop methods may not always be obvious or easy, but most professional tools aren't. Flexibility is the key. PS is miles more flexible than LR if you know what you're doing with regard to combining tools and, importantly, what those tools are actually doing at a low level.

As I said, its a professional product for professional users. None of the whiners here fit that description.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 21:07 UTC
In reply to:

razadaz: As has been already commented you can only improve a product so much. I get the impression that Adobe is trying to justify its subscription model to existing users. I doubt that any of these additions would make existing owners rush out and take out a subscription.

You... you realize that photoshop does a lot more than lightroom right, unrelated to raws?

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 20:00 UTC
In reply to:

razadaz: As has been already commented you can only improve a product so much. I get the impression that Adobe is trying to justify its subscription model to existing users. I doubt that any of these additions would make existing owners rush out and take out a subscription.

"Lightroom gained the ability to do 95% of what people used to go into photoshop to do"

That's hilarious!

Photoshop is a professional product aimed at a professional audience of graphics professionals, designers and retouchers. Not people who shoot flowers in their garden on the weekend.

The peanut gallery here that moans about the modestly priced subscriptions isn't, and never has been, the market. These small continuous updates are a welcome change from the hundreds we used to shell out every few months, or taking the time to decide whether or not to upgrade.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 19:34 UTC
In reply to:

Robert Holloway: Big logo on the outside says steal me. I used to have a Canon 300/2.8 and the case said Canon 300/2.8 on the outside! I would never buy a case that had branding like this, no matter how good it was.

Good thing gaff tape exists

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 16:23 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: I haven't been following this, but a few years ago Canon (I think) was adamant that sling straps like these aren't healthy for the tripod mount since it's not constructed for this kind of wear. Has there been anything new on this matter?

Yes, I don't like straps that connect to the tripod mount. The bottom plate there isn't meant for tension loads encountered when walking with a reasonably hefty lens and the connection is a bit shallow and prone to loosening by vibration. Not sure why its so popular with these straps.

Plus I find it annoying if you want to move on or off a *pod.

I use the BosStrap which attaches to a strap lug - those are obviously designed for that kind of load - and still has the over the shoulder advantage of a rapid strap.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 15:13 UTC

400 watts isn't very much (incandescent equivalent? I've found these ratings are often...stretched). High FPS work also calls for a lot of extra light, all other things being equal...

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2016 at 20:39 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

fmian: Just went to the stationary store after work and bought black cardboard for $2.40. Used a few magnets to attach it to a 6x6 foot diffusion cloth. Tied it to a couple of light stands. Backlit it with an open face and a fresnel.

Just the backlights:
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/1832778312/photos/3453427/_mg_9241-custom

Reflective umbrella on the front:
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/1832778312/photos/3453426/_mg_9240-custom

A shot from further back to show there's a lot more light around the edges than this broncolor setup. So the effect may be slightly different.. but you get the idea:
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/1832778312/photos/3453428/_mg_9242-custom

This kind of lighting is a pretty common way of shooting glass objects.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 18:24 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Efimoff: Is it just for the 'specific' reflection in the eyes of the model or is it actually modifies the light in a some unique way?

I think the most common use would be for photographing glass objects, placing the box behind them. The shape highlights the glass edges.

You could use this for a unique catchlight in the eyes, although the shadows might be a bit unusual? When used as a key or fill...

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 18:22 UTC
In reply to:

Holscen: Broncolor has a good reputation for consistent colour at all powers, 800j sounds ok but 1200 or more would be better to put through boxes and screens, but unless this can do HSS it's a bit limited.

I want a 1200w + unit that can have the option of a head extension to a stand based pack/control with lithium battery that can be easily swopped out.

Sort of like a quantum 5Dr on 1200ws steroids, built to Profoto standards with Broncolor colour consistency that does HSS or has flash head duration options with either a slow HS head or a fast action head. The Godox AD600 is on the right track but nobody seems to have it all....

The challenge is to keep it portable enough at 1200. One thing people don't think about is that currently checked baggage lithium batteries are limited to 100 watt-hours on airplanes. This sometimes causes problems with larger battery powered strobes.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 16:56 UTC
Total: 80, showing: 1 – 20
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