showmeyourpics

Lives in United States New Rochelle, NY, United States
Works as a instructor
Joined on Aug 29, 2011
About me:

taking better pics

Comments

Total: 184, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »

Hi, I don't know enough to judge their business decisions but it would be a pity to see them withdraw from digital photography. Through the years, they have brought to market some real jewels, both advanced compacts and M43. I had a GH1 for a while that I liked very much. Today I work with OM-D bodies but my lens set is half Panasonic as is my next lens in line for purchase, the 35-100mm f/2.8.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 13:02 UTC as 32nd comment
In reply to:

OlyPent: Turn every photographer into a lock-step, rule-obeying wuss, you'll probably save some lives and prevent some injuries, but you'll have FAR fewer good photos, most of which will look like sappy postcards.

Hi, I grew up at the foot of the Eastern Alps and for 20 years did quite a lot of rock climbing, extreme skiing, caving and diving, also solo. I am all for letting people go wherever and do whatever they want as long as they do not endanger anyone else, take full responsibility for the consequences (no suing everything under the sun) and do not expect rescuers risk their lives to get them out of the s..., ahem, trouble when they do something really dumb.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2017 at 01:45 UTC
On article Adobe Creative Suite 6 has been officially retired (352 comments in total)

Hi, as a part-time fine art pro I process all my (Raw) photos in PS6 (DxO OpticsPro for high ISO pics Prime denoising) but don't have a high volume of pics with which to deal day in and day out. I am learning award-winning Affinity Photo (Windows) which I recently purchased for $40, and for what I have seen so far the program is remarkably strong (it does have enthusiastic reviews across the board). The learning curve is substantial but I believe that in my situation it is well worth it. All the years with Photoshop have been great but with Adobe's current sales strategy it is time for me to move on.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 16:39 UTC as 22nd comment
On article Buying a second lens: what lens should I buy next? (296 comments in total)

Hi, Just one personal comment. For decades, I happily shot film with a bunch of prime lenses. I began using zooms when I moved to digital. With all their shortcomings, I find that zooms are ideal for my kind of shooting (nature, travel, fine art). I begin by pre-visualizing the picture which involves seeing a worthy subject (foreground and background), the quality and direction of the light and, if it is dynamic, foreseeing the direction and timing of the action. This takes me to decide where to stand to take the picture, and what kind of lens and exposure to use. Even with all this "homework" though, using a zoom allows me to easily explore the scene and try different compositions while not having to bother with changing lenses. 2 zooms covering the 35mm equivalent angle of view of 24mm to 200mm (one on each of my 2 E-M5II) take 95% of my pictures. This equals 6 prime lenses. Hence, I am now drooling on the new Oly 12-100mm f/4. I also use tripods as little as possible.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 18:32 UTC as 27th comment
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: As with so many other reviews the individual ignores completely the advantages in size, cost, and performance of the fast pro lenses available for this camera. It is very different than the situation with Canon or Nikon APS-C camera where owners have to use full frame lenses or mediocre wide angle zooms that are also slow. When it comes to a MFT camera and lens kit the MFT kit is going to be half the weight and half the bulk of the APS-C or full frame equivalent and half the cost. I have the Olympus 300mm f/4 OS lens and it is easily the equal of the Nikon 600mm f/4 VR lens that I also own and use and the Olympus lens was a third the cost and weighs 5 lbs. less and it small enough to get on a plane. With my full frame lenses a 500mm is the largest I can take in my carry on backpack.
Most performance issues mentioned are the type that can be corrected with firmware updates which will occur as with the E-M1 camera after its introduction.

Hi PoNY, when you try to standardize fine art you are on a slippery slope. I respect your choice of subjects, technique and gear 100% as a sacred right of every individual artist but expect the same consideration from you. In my and many other amateurs and pro's case including Ansel Adams, having enough DOF has been the true recurrent issue. This is why today focus stacking is so convenient. I also keep saying this: there are tough working conditions where maximum portability is key. This means that, if the equipment were not small and light enough, I wouldn't even go out and play. This is my reason to trade the limitations of the less bright line of M43 lenses for their truly minimum size and weight, and bring out the big guns when the going gets easier. In my morning walks in my parks on the Long island Sound with really tough Winter conditions the only camera I carry is my Nikon P7800. It's that or no pics at all. (phones don't need to apply).

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2016 at 19:22 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

soundknight21: I love my Panasonic but the OMD is turning up the heat a little. The JPEGs have gotten a lot better on this one but like the Fuji-XT2 the RAWs are a little underwhelming.

I like the ergonomics, and the fact that you can get a battery grip is really awesome. I hope panasonic gets more into battery grips (like the new G80)

Hi neverendinglight, coming from the days of manual cameras and b&w film, I tend to be more demanding in terms of my own technique and creativity than cutting-edge technology. Also, my typical subjects are relatively static and composition and lighting are my driving issues. My E-M5II's have enough technology in them to last me for the next 2 decades and in terms of hardware I care more about everlasting, high quality lenses. I am afraid that many photographers tend to rely too much on ever evolving technology instead of learning how to get the best out of the available one. I have seen this also at work through my long years as a test, quality and applications engineer in the military and industrial electronics.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2016 at 18:39 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

AleMat496: I have OM-D E-M1 (which I love) and was waiting for Mark II. Now, given it's high price vs limited improvements, I'm looking at other options including, but not limited to GH5, or even D500...

Hi, these are 4x and 5x zooms. Have you compared them with the same APS-C ranges?

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2016 at 20:03 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

gibbygoo: So is it a problem that I'm a full-time professional photographer and I have no idea what pixel-pitch is, why it matters or how I would notice the difference?

To be exact, it's the distance between the center of contiguous pixels.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2016 at 20:00 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

perry rhodan: The menustructure is a step backwards?! At least. Rant on... "Tried one extensively. Must say that the 4 earlier m43 bodies from oly I had (epl1 epl2 em10 em5ii) were much better menu wise. And they were an absolute dog already. Olympus WHAT ARE YOU DRIN/THINKING? It's 2016 going 17. Equipment should empower me, not make me mad every other day. Sorry, but I so much want to love these beautifully crafted bodies. So came back 3 times." Rant off .. Not anymore.

I guess it's a personal thing. It is true that I have a lot of experience but, with the current standardization, I am able to work my way through 95% of any camera menu without consulting the manual. The remaining 5% is taken care of with a little research. With a number of custom settings memories available, one does not even need to remember where to find what. A better menu is a better menu but it is the least of my concerns when dealing with an otherwise really good camera.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2016 at 19:55 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: As with so many other reviews the individual ignores completely the advantages in size, cost, and performance of the fast pro lenses available for this camera. It is very different than the situation with Canon or Nikon APS-C camera where owners have to use full frame lenses or mediocre wide angle zooms that are also slow. When it comes to a MFT camera and lens kit the MFT kit is going to be half the weight and half the bulk of the APS-C or full frame equivalent and half the cost. I have the Olympus 300mm f/4 OS lens and it is easily the equal of the Nikon 600mm f/4 VR lens that I also own and use and the Olympus lens was a third the cost and weighs 5 lbs. less and it small enough to get on a plane. With my full frame lenses a 500mm is the largest I can take in my carry on backpack.
Most performance issues mentioned are the type that can be corrected with firmware updates which will occur as with the E-M1 camera after its introduction.

Hi, f/1.2 and f/1.8 lenses cannot be compared directly with the former requiring larger size and consequent higher weight. A better if not perfect alternative would be the Zuiko 25mm f/1.8 which is much smaller and weighs 118 grams. I have a tremendous respect for the Sony but it's exactly the size of the lenses that convinced me to go with M43. I work with the "standard" zoom pair 12-40mm and 40-100mm f/2.8. A fair comparison would be the excellent short Zuiko and Sony 24-70mm f/2.8: 382gr, 3.31", $699 vs 886gr, 5.35", $2198.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2016 at 19:46 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)

About the portability of the M43 system. I shoot relatively static subjects for fine art printing and do some animal (especially birds) photography for fun since I am often out in Nature. I really like to travel light especially on difficult terrain and in tough weather. My 2 E-M5II bodies are very small and I can choose to mount either my less bright but minuscule Oly and Pana lenses, or my pro equivalents. In most shooting conditions, there is no visible difference in print quality between the 2 classes of lenses up to poster size and ISO800 developing my Raw files in DxO Optics Pro, Prime noise reduction. In my situation, the E-M5II's are more exemplary of the exceptional portability of the M43 system than the new E-M1II while retaining a great feature set. I believe that the E-M1II is an awesome camera with its own niche but it's over-engineered for most photographers, myself included.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 19:25 UTC as 59th comment
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

AleMat496: I have OM-D E-M1 (which I love) and was waiting for Mark II. Now, given it's high price vs limited improvements, I'm looking at other options including, but not limited to GH5, or even D500...

Hi AleMat496, the excellent D500 is often mentioned as an alternative to the M43 flagships. It has an edge on image quality but the M43 has the size/weight advantage. I work with two E-M5II. The D500 is 2.9 times larger and 1.8 times heavier. This carries over to the lenses. The E-M1II has less of an advantage, it over-engineered for most non-pro photographers and has the penalty of its steep price. To be honest, the improvements over the E-M1 are not limited but could very well be for the kind of photography you do.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 03:27 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

soundknight21: I love my Panasonic but the OMD is turning up the heat a little. The JPEGs have gotten a lot better on this one but like the Fuji-XT2 the RAWs are a little underwhelming.

I like the ergonomics, and the fact that you can get a battery grip is really awesome. I hope panasonic gets more into battery grips (like the new G80)

Hi soundknight21, Raw files being a little underwhelming is very vague. Do they show poor detail and/or dynamic range after you (properly) process them? So far, the sensors in the Oly and Pana cameras have not shown that much of a difference. As pdelux has written, it is your prerogative to "want" the E-M1II but that does not mean that you "must". This camera is a jewel but is over-engineered for most mortals and with the difference from $2,000 you can get some awesome lens ...

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 03:17 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cultured Vulture: Isn't it time for DPR to stop giving mirror less cameras points for having great AF "for a mirrorless". Just as it has past time for DSLR's to be given a pass for poor video or live view focus. The camera either performs or it doesn't. It either produces great images or it doesn't. If you want to make comparisons, base it on price for a given performance. The Mark II is expensive, does it perform to its price or doesn't it? I'm not saying one way or another but that's the way I would be looking at it no matter what camera was being reviewed.

If you are happy with your system God bless you and happy shooting. But let's be rational, there is no way for any APS-C system with equivalent equipment to compare favorably against M43 in terms of size and weight also considering that when the shoot is critical (ephemeral subjects, expensive travel, etc) you want to have with you your basic system plus redundancy (i.e.: 2 bodies). Case in point, when I want to travel very light I have available to me the E-M10II and lenses such as the Pana 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 and 35-100 f/4-5.6. I must live with lower brightness but the lenses are minuscule and the IQ is there.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2016 at 16:57 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cultured Vulture: Isn't it time for DPR to stop giving mirror less cameras points for having great AF "for a mirrorless". Just as it has past time for DSLR's to be given a pass for poor video or live view focus. The camera either performs or it doesn't. It either produces great images or it doesn't. If you want to make comparisons, base it on price for a given performance. The Mark II is expensive, does it perform to its price or doesn't it? I'm not saying one way or another but that's the way I would be looking at it no matter what camera was being reviewed.

Hi, I am an OMD user who scaled down from 4x5", 2 1/4", and 35mm film, and 27lb tripods. I am not interested in comparisons with larger sensor systems because, like many amateurs and pros, my choosing M43 gear was due to the desire to travel light. I carry a relatively small and quite comfortable sling bag which contains two E-M5II bodies with 9-18mm, 12-40mm, 35-100mm and 100-300mm lenses (double for equivalent angle of view), spare batteries and memory cards, phone, wallet and keys. Out of my E-M5II's I get enough IQ for publications and making impeccable prints up to 24x36". I can walk and shoot for a whole day concentrating on creativity because my gear is out of my way. Hence, I am truly interested in developments within the M43 system but have no more than a general curiosity about anything else which is bigger and heavier. I trust Olympus because none of its 13 cameras I have owned over the years has ever failed me.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2016 at 03:45 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)

BTW, today only the Olympus outlet has the refurbished EM5II for $540.00.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 19:01 UTC as 85th comment | 1 reply
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

SeeRoy: I got caught by the EM5. It did me one favour, forever stopping me generating any enthusiasm for the constant "churn" of the latest, greatest product of the camera industry. That camera has the most abominable ergonomics and general interface design (both firmware and hardware) of almost any consumer electronic device I've ever had the misfortune to own.
It goes on . Olympus managed to destroy the camera (twice) after I asked them to remove the fingerprint from the sensor with which it came.
Every time the latest "must-have" variant emerges I wonder if they've managed to redesign this series of cameras so that they're actually enjoyable to use. The EM5 is almost permanently in some unwanted mode. It's actually amazing that a mal-executed product like that could ever get to market. Actually, on second thoughts, it's not that unusual.

OMG, I can't resist: are you sure you have human anatomy and central nervous system? (sorry gents!)

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 18:51 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)

Hi, I had an interesting and enjoyable discussion with "entoman" about the current role of camera technology in the photographic process. My 2c on this subject are as follows. Technology surely is a great enabler. In today's cameras though it has reached a point where any "serious" model you buy is going to be very competent and give you great IQ even with poster size prints (follow "Fun 4 all" links). I am not the only one I know who takes advantage of the launch of a new camera to buy the deeply discounted previous model. Also, you can keep the camera you have much longer and spend money on upgrading your lenses and improving your technique by, for example, attending reputable workshops. There is no perfect camera system and different sensor size ones should be judged independently. I am a fine art, part-time pro and what this review has shown me is that, while I drool on it, I don't "need" the E-M1II because my E-M5II is already capable of elegantly handling anything I throw at it.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 16:08 UTC as 90th comment | 2 replies
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

neverendinglight: So do I buy 2 G85's with the decent kit lenses or one EM1 ii body? Serious question. I get that it depends on my uses, but I'm an enthusiast that likes to shoot all sorts of types, including video. Currently shooting EM5ii and GX8. IQ seems to be about the same, but I seem to get better results from the GX8 which makes complete sense because I absolutely love the EM5 design/looks/ergonomics and the opposite is true of the GX8 (ugh!). Decisions decisions.

Hi neverendinglight, very few people truly "need" the E-M1II. When you get serious about your photography two camera bodies make a lot of sense for redundancy and not having to change lenses in challenging environments. You could do better than the kit lens though. I work with two OMD bodies. When I want max portability (long hikes, snow, ice) I mount on each camera the Pana 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 and 35-100mm f/4-5.6. The lenses are not that bright but they are affordable, minuscule and the IQ is surprisingly high for the price. In more comfortable situations, I replace them with the Oly 12-40mm F/2.8 and the Pana 35-100mm f/2.8 with are stellar lenses but also much larger and much more expensive.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 14:44 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1378 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): We've had numerous respected pros (not the ones paid by Olympus or another company) mention that they have 24-30 inch prints from M43 and FF cameras hanging in their studios, and they all say the same thing - no one can tell which were shot with a larger or smaller sensor.

And how many other cameras could have survived that Iceland junket that all the reviewers went on, where they were shooting in the rain and mist for several days. Every reviewer commented that their camera got covered with dirt and water and not one reported and issue.

Hi, the whole argument is about your statement that photographers need? want? the best gear ever. This can be true for some amateurs but not for most pro's who focus on a balance between relative IQ, feature set and budget. Pro's choices should be taken into consideration because they are typically very concrete. The idea that the absolute best gear is paramount for good photography leads to a bunch of (disparaging) comments on these forums that are truly maniacal. There are fields of photography where smaller sensor cameras, with all their limitations, are still the best choice at least because of their portability and anonymity. This is why I invite objectivity especially when comparing different sensor size gear. Case in point, this review has shown me that I don't need an E-M1II because my E-M5II can already do all I need very well. I can spend my money on awesome lenses instead. Anyway, it looks like no-one is following this discussion so we should stop here. Happy shooting.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 14:27 UTC
Total: 184, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »