Paul Auclair

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Nov 20, 2002

Comments

Total: 114, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Vitantonio Dell'Orto: 20 fps and the battery lasts 450 shots? That is 22 seconds shooting before having to change it. Don't think any actual sport or wildlife photographer would be thrilled. Until they'll fix the battery life in mirrorless (not just Sony's) reflex will always be the best choice for that kinds of photography.

so is it your opinion that the new 2.2X times more powerful battery of the A9 will likely "get empty without shooting *ANY* Picture, too"?
I have an old A7II with grip (bought as soon as it was available 2+ years ago, with the two batteries). I regularly go for days/weeks without using the camera and do not charge batteries AFTER use. I'll usually charge them up if need be if I plan to use the camera the next day or so but I often just grab the camera and shoot. Never not been able to shoot. Period.

Just how long does a typical "wildlife photographer" stay out in the wild, camera ready, waiting to shoot?

BTW-I have 4 DSLRs that I seem to recall suffer from battery drain when not in use just the same as my 4 MILCs.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 20:13 UTC
In reply to:

Vitantonio Dell'Orto: 20 fps and the battery lasts 450 shots? That is 22 seconds shooting before having to change it. Don't think any actual sport or wildlife photographer would be thrilled. Until they'll fix the battery life in mirrorless (not just Sony's) reflex will always be the best choice for that kinds of photography.

You are declaring publicly that your comprehension indicates the battery will last 22 seconds?

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 18:34 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (891 comments in total)

today...EVF.
i was strictly in favor of the OVF.
things changed.
after a long enough period of time with EVF i found when shooting with an OVF i felt "there is something wrong here?!".
I realized i had simply acclimated to WYSIWYG, focus peaking and (mainly) Magnified View/Focus Assist and preferred the benefits of those functions over the OVF.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 16:28 UTC as 113th comment
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: I recently installed the 10 Express for Sony.
Is there any way to efficiently and accurately incorporate X-Rite's ColorChecker Passport with C1?
I emailed the same Q to Phaze One a week ago or more and have heard nothing back.

Ahh great info thanks.
Fun for after work.
Paul

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 14:56 UTC

I recently installed the 10 Express for Sony.
Is there any way to efficiently and accurately incorporate X-Rite's ColorChecker Passport with C1?
I emailed the same Q to Phaze One a week ago or more and have heard nothing back.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 22:36 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1381 comments in total)

the highest speed mechanical burst mode for mk2 is listed at 10 FPS with AF-C
the highest speed mechanical burst mode for mk1 is listed at 6.5 FPS with AF-C *no IS
-questions
the mk1 does 9 FPS with AF-C after f/w 3.0 no?
will the EM1.2 achieve maximum 10 FPS burst rate with full IS/IBIS activated?
-or is it impossible to determine due to IS Priority settings of FPS or IS?

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 22:37 UTC as 43rd comment
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: should a photograph/photographer really be the principle focus of what transpires at these tragic events.
do we need to see these images in order to believe what takes place?

what is a "historic context" that only a photo can establish?

i read a post in which the author stated that he/she read about the assassination but not did not really 'feel it' emotionally until he/she had seen the image(s).
So, yes indeed there is an added impact when photos are added to an story.
in the end though if most folks do nothing but post/reply about a story and offer no help or assistance, then what value has the photo really added to the story or the more important issue that is described by the story?

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 20:53 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: should a photograph/photographer really be the principle focus of what transpires at these tragic events.
do we need to see these images in order to believe what takes place?

I see a shooter and I see a dead body.
I know all about what the photographer did and how he felt at the event.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 22:54 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: should a photograph/photographer really be the principle focus of what transpires at these tragic events.
do we need to see these images in order to believe what takes place?

great, we have established that photos taken at these types of events are necessary to establish truth and also to evoke a higher degree of emotional response.
how would a frame, or several, taken from an unmanned tripod mounted video camera not suffice?
why is "the plight of the professional photographer" the key issue here?
this is a photo website so any/all photos/photographers are sacred no matter what?

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 22:29 UTC

should a photograph/photographer really be the principle focus of what transpires at these tragic events.
do we need to see these images in order to believe what takes place?

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 19:56 UTC as 168th comment | 24 replies
In reply to:

sh10453: It's also a matter of time before hackers get to cameras' operating systems, via Wi-Fi, for example, and do some serious damage, or demand a ransom.
With the convenience of wireless communications, there is an equal amount of risk.
Imagine a scenario where a photo journalist, or a sports photographer at the start of a big event turns the camera on to see a colorful message on the screen from a hacker, and to find that the camera has been locked up.
What a nightmare!!!
I think that manufacturers need to address this issue with dual verification when it comes to wireless communications.
Let's see what some network experts think.

sh10453
security against theft or damage of one's assets of any kind is a valuable option to have.
you asked about a solution to rectify a hacked 'camera' and
I replied that I'd shut it (the camera) off or use a back up.
you did not ask me what i'd do about a compromised computer.
I find it odd that you replied with a smarty comment referencing an entirely different topic/question.
So, a question for you because i'm curious...
how many folks/pros do you think use computers and/or laptops to shoot major/important events?
to clarify...using a computer "for the purpose of capturing images" (like an ordinary camera does) and not for storing/editing/uploading to head office later on.
I ask because my posts in this thread all pertain to cameras but all replies to my posts are related to a wide variety of internet capable/smart devices and have little or nothing to do with cameras.
been a slice,
Paul

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2016 at 08:09 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: It's also a matter of time before hackers get to cameras' operating systems, via Wi-Fi, for example, and do some serious damage, or demand a ransom.
With the convenience of wireless communications, there is an equal amount of risk.
Imagine a scenario where a photo journalist, or a sports photographer at the start of a big event turns the camera on to see a colorful message on the screen from a hacker, and to find that the camera has been locked up.
What a nightmare!!!
I think that manufacturers need to address this issue with dual verification when it comes to wireless communications.
Let's see what some network experts think.

"What do you think Getty would do?"
turn camera off (or if necessary remove battery to do so) to disable wifi and continue shooting with wifi disabled?
use back up camera with wifi disabled?
shoot tethered?
I guess encryption might be of some use/comfort to those requiring some sort of security against unwanted use/actions of their data/device. However I also believe that if a camera is enabled to encrypt data then perhaps a hacker then will be able to (and want to) hack a camera to add his/her own encryption...payday/ransom.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 05:31 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: It's also a matter of time before hackers get to cameras' operating systems, via Wi-Fi, for example, and do some serious damage, or demand a ransom.
With the convenience of wireless communications, there is an equal amount of risk.
Imagine a scenario where a photo journalist, or a sports photographer at the start of a big event turns the camera on to see a colorful message on the screen from a hacker, and to find that the camera has been locked up.
What a nightmare!!!
I think that manufacturers need to address this issue with dual verification when it comes to wireless communications.
Let's see what some network experts think.

thanks for your time.
assuming the way a 'hacker' will gain control of a camera is via wifi
So...what can I do with a camera when I am connected via wifi?
I can change exposure settings, release the shutter, delete recently taken images, and power the device off. I can connect to a printer to print files.
I can not do online shopping/banking etc., link with other cameras to create a network, etc..
The camera does not have stored login credentials/banking info, does not have keystrokes to log, will not run executable files, and can not link with other cameras to take over the internet.
So would a hacker be able to do anything with my camera that I could not?
If I am operating a camera and it seems as though someone else has taken control of it what happens if I simply disable the wifi?
what incentive does a hacker have to attempt control of a camera...not millions of internet devices...a camera...a simple ordinary camera?

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 05:15 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: It's also a matter of time before hackers get to cameras' operating systems, via Wi-Fi, for example, and do some serious damage, or demand a ransom.
With the convenience of wireless communications, there is an equal amount of risk.
Imagine a scenario where a photo journalist, or a sports photographer at the start of a big event turns the camera on to see a colorful message on the screen from a hacker, and to find that the camera has been locked up.
What a nightmare!!!
I think that manufacturers need to address this issue with dual verification when it comes to wireless communications.
Let's see what some network experts think.

most if not all hackers these days are working towards a payday.
the days of exploiting vulnerabilities in OSs and virus programs and such is mostly done with.
todays hackers employ social engineering tactics (click here to; ...win a prize...update adobe flash...confirm your bank passwords...etc..) which only works on the "gullible".
how does simply "taking over a camera" benefit the financially motivated?

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 14:59 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: It's also a matter of time before hackers get to cameras' operating systems, via Wi-Fi, for example, and do some serious damage, or demand a ransom.
With the convenience of wireless communications, there is an equal amount of risk.
Imagine a scenario where a photo journalist, or a sports photographer at the start of a big event turns the camera on to see a colorful message on the screen from a hacker, and to find that the camera has been locked up.
What a nightmare!!!
I think that manufacturers need to address this issue with dual verification when it comes to wireless communications.
Let's see what some network experts think.

I'd think hackers care not about hacking cameras...no money involved. no bank account/ebay/e-shopping passwords to retrieve.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 05:21 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: sorry...I should know this but what is "Record View"?

Thank You.
I usually have Rec view ON then. No worries.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2016 at 04:59 UTC

sorry...I should know this but what is "Record View"?

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2016 at 04:44 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies

"GoPro President Tony Bates will step down from his position at the end of 2016"
i wonder how much "stepping down" pay mr. president is leaving with.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2016 at 22:14 UTC as 24th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: these guys have done nothing wrong.
they are heroes among men.
it's obvious they have been thoroughly raised on the most current and pervasive...woops i meant to say 'prevalent' teachings of western society/culture which absolutely dictates this sort of behavior.
surely we ought to be donating to their kickstarter/fundme pages so they can travel further yet and trash more stuff for fun.
go youtube/social media!!!

just for record..I am kidding above and I do feel that these folks and their likes ought to received stiff penalties.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 22:57 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Auclair: these guys have done nothing wrong.
they are heroes among men.
it's obvious they have been thoroughly raised on the most current and pervasive...woops i meant to say 'prevalent' teachings of western society/culture which absolutely dictates this sort of behavior.
surely we ought to be donating to their kickstarter/fundme pages so they can travel further yet and trash more stuff for fun.
go youtube/social media!!!

these fine young men, and their many kin, have the courage and where-with-all required to accomplish such amazing feats.
those who lack such admirably 'today' characteristics should not be envious of those whom do but should be proud of them.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 19:26 UTC
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