ChesterY

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Sep 15, 2005

Comments

Total: 28, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

iAPX: I beg your pardon, M'dame, I might be dumb, but for me a kickstarter project is not a project, it didn't exists, it's a dream, it's prototype, it's virtual, it's no more than a fantasy, and some of them doesn't event deserve a kleenex.

Stop presenting kickstart "projects"' (masturbating) as a product.
So now, Brittany backup this "kickstarter project", and I am willing to see how it goes for it, and how she will apologize for what she wrote, and eventually be dismissed from DPREVIEW.

Yes, you have to assume, Brittany, and DPREVIEW too :)

Assuming that all Kickstarter projects/products are "a fantasy" makes little more sense than assuming there is zero risk to backing everything on Kickstarter.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 00:52 UTC
In reply to:

Hellstrom: Mid-level phones from 2013 had the same lame 64Gb storage as this supposedly flagship model.

Get the OnePlus Five - more RAM, more storage, also dual cameras, half the price.

OnePlus 5 is a great value, but there are reasons to get the Note. Larger screen at higher res, memory card slot, water resistance, and of course the stylus.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 02:38 UTC
In reply to:

Elite83: I never thought I'd say this, but he's actually right, this actually is far better than a precarious half-hanging out SD card: http://maximac.se/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/isd-card-reader-macbook-air.jpg

Other manufacturers manage to have SD card slots that have the SD card completely recessed into the body of the laptop. Zero protrusion.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 02:01 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V (234 comments in total)
In reply to:

allari: I own a RX100 Mk1 and still do not see a strong reason to upgrade. The fast AF is a good thing but for the rest no big jump ahead. I even preferred the 28-85mm zoom over the 24-70mm. When I want to go really, really wide, I put the camera vertical, take 2-3 shots and assemble. Finally: I paid 500 euro for the Mk1. 1000 euro for what is basically the same "upgraded" camera looks like... :-o

If it works for you, cool. No need to upgrade. I'm on the Mk3 and when I went from Mk1 to Mk2, buying the camera anew was worth it to me just for the WiFi/NFC. There was also the tilt screen and hotshoe. And, for the Mk3, the EVF.

Personally, I prefer wide over tele, so like the "newer" focal range. And low-light sensitivity got better over iterations as well.

But the Mk1 is still a superb camera, so no need to change what works for you.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 01:49 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V (234 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): You have to laugh at the battery life being pretty much the same as most other tiny cameras as a constant con. Does anyone really use these cameras without a spare?

I have spares, but can easily go a full day of vacation snapshot shooting on a single charge.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 01:46 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V (234 comments in total)
In reply to:

BobT3218: A very cute and desirable little camera. However, in view of the sensor wars going on elsewhere and the incredible quality of phone cameras, I really can't see a viable market for it and its like. I mean, I'm having difficulty imagining what kind of photographer would feel lost without such a camera.

I've owned the Sony RX100 Mk 1, 2, and 3. Currently on 3. Have it on me a majority of the time. 90%+ of the time if I actually anticipate wanting to take photographs.

I care a lot about these sort of high-end pocketable compacts. In contrast, I care almost not at all about the quality of the camera/sensor in my phone, because it will always be a massive step down in image quality and ergonomics.

I also use "full-size" cameras. Mirrorless Fuji's now, but historically Nikon D-SLRs.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 01:42 UTC

Like others are noting, these are too large. Getting a good setup for Lightroom would take up way too much space, and also would be super expensive.

For an accessory controller to be used with default shortcuts, I'd recommend a gaming controller like the Logitech G13. Or an editing accessory controller/keyboard like the Contour ShuttlePRO.

If you dig around deep enough and want a really comprehensive set of physical controls, there are ways to use something like a Behringer BCF-2000, which is considerable in size, but has way more controls. And the faders are motorized.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 22:43 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

left eye: Virtual surface apps on an ipad or other tablets, would be totally configurable, a one-off purchase for the apps and you can have as many sliders and knobs as you wish, at any size, order, and colour-coded, etc.

Midi controller apps such as this have been available for tablets for many years now.

Yes they are not physical controls - but there-in lies their flexibility, plus touch screens are now second-nature to us now.

+ I don't see any info on if the sliders are motorised? - if they are not their positions won't correspond to changes you make via a mouse to on-screen controls. A touch-screen control-surface would of course.

The problem with using a tablet for virtual sliders and such is that one cannot use them by feel, so one has to look at them. If one is looking at something other than the photo itself, then one might as well be looking at the editing program's native controls.

The advantage of physical controls is that one can use them "blindly" by feel.

That said, this solution isn't actually ideal as a set of physical controls for a complete, say, Lightroom setup.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 22:37 UTC
In reply to:

Ran Plett: Does DPReview get paid to sponsor these campaigns?

Paying attention to products and calling them out for readers, because they might be of interest to readers is not "sponsoring" them.

There's no endorsement of the product. There is no encouragement to buy.

There's no reason to presume that this is the product of some sort of conflict of interest.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 22:06 UTC
In reply to:

unsignedzero: So I'm buying a tote/backpack that can hold a small mirrorless body and a few lens for $175 when alternative bags such as the Thinktank Turnstyle 10 exist for less?

Apparently you aren't. But, evidently, some other people are and will.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 22:03 UTC

Wait...is it a "28-56mm zoom." or is it a...

28mm or 56mm "zoom"

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 22:02 UTC as 388th comment | 1 reply
On article Hasselblad True Zoom Moto Mod hands-on preview (153 comments in total)
In reply to:

Autriche78: I don't understand the logic here.

There is NO space saving factor here. You're going to have to take the camera module with you everywhere just in case you want to use it.

So why not buy a real pocketable camera with better specs, better image quality, and direct Wi-Fi transfer to whatever smartphone you already have, and take that with you instead?

This is a pointless gadget. Beyond the cool crowd and the must haves, I can't see the appeal.

I routinely carry my Samsung Galaxy phone and a Sony RX100 Mk3. That is an extremely bulky and heavy combination, only just barely fits in a single pants pocket together, and not without a really obvious bulge from the lens of the RX100. (And neither can go into the other pants pocket, because that's where keys are.)

This, on the other hand, would be very easy and quite unobtrusive to have in a pocket. It's not pointless. It's a compromise: bulkier but much better than the in-built phone camera, but much worse and much less bulky than a separate compact camera.

Edit: If I could buy a snap-on module like this for my phone, I would very seriously consider it for all the times I care to be able to take better photos than my phone's camera can take, but when I'm not willing to carry my RX100.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 00:58 UTC
On article Hasselblad True Zoom Moto Mod hands-on preview (153 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cameracist: I don't get it. Either you leave it on your phone even if not shooting, which is impractical, or you keep it separate until you need to shoot, in which case you may as well grab a real camera, as you don't save any space...

Why is it impractical to leave it on your phone? It's not so thick that people couldn't comfortably pocket it in a front pants pocket.

It's just a compromise: you get much better imaging capability by approximately doubling the mass of your phone. But, of course, if you're willing to carry a separate compact camera, then that justifies itself with the leap in imaging quality that allows.

I don't think it's enough to determine what phone I use, but if I had this sort of module for the phone I use, I would definitely buy it.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 00:53 UTC
On article Peak Design adds Range Pouch to Everyday lineup (22 comments in total)

It's pretty pricey for what it is, but I added on of the Small pouches to my Backpack pledge. I like how this is minimal in padding and thereby also less structured, so that it takes up less space. For me, padding protection against impact is not a big deal. Need some protection but main use of pouches is to prevent abrasion/scratching and to "seal" against detritus in the bag and to just simply segregate a little.

But I do also like that, if I wanted to just walk around with two or three prime lenses, I could do that with just my camera around my neck and two more in the pouch, either on my belt, or slung over my shoulder with a strap.

And one of the most appealing aspects of Peak's stuff is how there is a modular ecosystem of sorts that is created by the use of their straps and anchor points.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2016 at 22:55 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

Impulses: The Sling looks SUPER interesting for smaller kits like M4/3, it's somewhat similar to Thinktank's Turnstyle but I more than welcome another choice of bag in that style because there really aren't very many. Specially at that particular size (and made to fit tight against the body), a lot of "slings" these days are just oddly shaped messenger bags that swing around more than a proper messenger.

Something that's "only" good for a FF DSLR and a couple lenses will easily fit two small M4/3 bodies and like four smaller M4/3 lenses... I'm happy with my Turnstyle for day use but it has no tripod straps and isn't water repellant without a cover, might jump on Peak's Sling for travel purposes... Them not having extra dividers available for now would be an issue tho, I'd need at least 1 if not 2.

The tablet pocket looks like it'd just about fit a Surface Pro or even Dell XPS 13, pretty nice for something that compact, tho my current tablet is far smaller.

Yeah, that's true. It IS pretty sizable. Loaded up, I found that I would be carrying a pretty heavy load. (That said, I wanted something to carry a compact laptop and not just a tablet.) Mine was stolen and I never got around to getting a replacement. If I were to replace it now, I probably would go with the Peak Sling for your reason that it's more compact...if I want larger capacity, I'd go with one of the backpacks for better weight distribution. I put down a pledge for one of the 20L backpacks.

(And, yeah...InCase's DSLR Sling is more compact than the Marcopoulos, but not as slim as the Peak.)

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 00:14 UTC
In reply to:

ZurichPhoto: It has been interesting watching the increasing number of products that are being sold (marketed?) on DPReview as Kickstarter programs. We've reached the point where Kickstarter is not about backing a good idea but simply reducing the risk of the business to as near zero as possible. I want a bigger discount for essentially ensuring that the seller makes a profit.

It's not risk-free if they have already fully developed the product to final or near-final form. That takes a significant investment in design and prototyping.

Kickstarter mainly allows them a very good platform to conduct a pre-sale. And it's not free, as Kickstarter will take 5%. And will also charge higher than usual transaction fees.

As for the discount...they obviously try to find the optimal balance between offering enough of a discount to incentivize pre-orders while retaining as much profit margin as they can. If it's not steep enough of a discount for you, that's up to you, but it's apparently enough for thousands of consumers.

I decided not to pre-order the Everyday Messenger and then ended up buying it at my local camera store for full retail. One of the few instances I wish I had been more impulsive.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 02:41 UTC
In reply to:

LocoCork: Nice bags. Shame that the sling bag is almost exact copy of Sony's LCS-ASB1.
http://www.sony.jp/ichigan/products/LCS-ASB1/

Sony didn't pioneer this form factor.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 02:32 UTC
In reply to:

Impulses: The Sling looks SUPER interesting for smaller kits like M4/3, it's somewhat similar to Thinktank's Turnstyle but I more than welcome another choice of bag in that style because there really aren't very many. Specially at that particular size (and made to fit tight against the body), a lot of "slings" these days are just oddly shaped messenger bags that swing around more than a proper messenger.

Something that's "only" good for a FF DSLR and a couple lenses will easily fit two small M4/3 bodies and like four smaller M4/3 lenses... I'm happy with my Turnstyle for day use but it has no tripod straps and isn't water repellant without a cover, might jump on Peak's Sling for travel purposes... Them not having extra dividers available for now would be an issue tho, I'd need at least 1 if not 2.

The tablet pocket looks like it'd just about fit a Surface Pro or even Dell XPS 13, pretty nice for something that compact, tho my current tablet is far smaller.

You may want to look at the InCase Ari Marcopoulos Sling:
https://www.incase.com/shop/devices/camera/

I used one for a good while and really liked the bag. Like you say: it fits super-snug to the body and that was an essential feature to me when cycling. I don't think the Peak Everyday Sling will actually be as snug, because the design provides more latitude.

And if you're jamming a lot inside, it could get heavy. The Peak Sling looks to have thinner straps, which might really dig after a while. The InCase has a thick pad on one end of the strap.

Oh...but the the InCase is problematic if tripod carry is important. The face upon which you strap the tripod is the "down" side on which it should rest when you put the bag down. So if you have a tripod strapped on and want to put the bag down, you either have to scratch up your tripod or you have to rest the bag on one of the larger sides, which is at least awkward and also soils the sides that you really want to keep clean.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 02:31 UTC
In reply to:

blurredvision: They continue to use Kickstarter as a cheap pre-order tool and marketing device, all the while getting big sites like this one to dedicate an article to it. I don't know why that annoys me, but it does. Oh well. At least Kickstarter makes it easy to take your money back if you change your mind.

I don't understand why Kickstarter campaigns by reputable companies prompt people to get annoyed. It's not a very cheap pre-order tool, as Kickstarter takes a 5% commission, and also charges transaction fees that are probably a point or more higher than what one would pay otherwise.

Their Everyday Messenger campaign raised over $5M, which means they gave up $250,000+ to Kickstarter. 5% isn't a big percentage, but $250K is a very considerable amount of money.

Moreover, the campaign provides value to the customer, who gets a discount for the pre-sale commitment. And it's not even an irrevocable deposit.

As for sites like DPReview having an article on this...isn't part of what this site is supposed to do is to have articles featuring new product releases? It's not like they're shilling crap. Peak's products, while not to everyone's taste, have generally been very well received and there are thousands of very happy owners of Peak equipment.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 02:21 UTC
In reply to:

RichRMA: Anyone know what the lifespan is for an SSD drive used for continued back-up of files?

Tech Report did a test with some popular drives and they were getting total aggregate writes of 700TB to 2.4PB before drives conked out, so even on the low end of things, it's pretty clear that you'll outgrow the drive before it dies.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 20:15 UTC
Total: 28, showing: 1 – 20
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