Tonio Loewald

Lives in United States Arlington, VA, United States
Works as a Consultant
Has a website at http://loewald.com/
Joined on Jul 25, 2005

Comments

Total: 312, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Hasselblad X1D-50c First Impressions Review (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tonio Loewald: "Contrary to popular belief, greater bit depth doesn't help overall 'tonality'; instead it means there are enough available values to accurately describe the deepest shadows, rather than clumping everything into a few values, leading to a type of noise (quantization error)."

What? You're saying it doesn't do X, it does X. And incidentally the linked article shows bit depth improving tonality. Having more detail in shadows is tonality.

What is important is that bit depth subdivides dynamic range, so if you have enormous dynamic range and poor bit depth you'll have worse tonality than if you had the same bit depth and less dynamic range (assuming you shot something within the dynamic range).

So what you mean is that "greater bit depth doesn't help overall tonality beyond a certain point" which is kind of true of anything. Also bit depth that is overwhelmed by noise isn't bit depth, it's noise.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2017 at 00:42 UTC
On article Hasselblad X1D-50c First Impressions Review (316 comments in total)

"Contrary to popular belief, greater bit depth doesn't help overall 'tonality'; instead it means there are enough available values to accurately describe the deepest shadows, rather than clumping everything into a few values, leading to a type of noise (quantization error)."

What? You're saying it doesn't do X, it does X. And incidentally the linked article shows bit depth improving tonality. Having more detail in shadows is tonality.

What is important is that bit depth subdivides dynamic range, so if you have enormous dynamic range and poor bit depth you'll have worse tonality than if you had the same bit depth and less dynamic range (assuming you shot something within the dynamic range).

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2017 at 17:27 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

I found this to be a lot less drivel-like than usual. He actually says things like our customers seem to want X so we are giving them X. We have to prioritize. We aren't making bodies smaller because customers aren't asking us to do that.

What else can you expect? A roadmap for competitors to use which osbornes their current product line?

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2017 at 15:50 UTC
In reply to:

flektogon: I am not sure why everyone is suddenly so keen on such, for a long time considered mediocre lenses. Those triplets (3/3) used to be basic, cheapest lenses during the film era. The Tessar-like (4/3) were far better lenses, but the Biotar-like (6/n) used to be far superior to everything else. Do you like the bokeh of this Trioplan? Because I don't.

We just need to remind millennials that in the old days photography used chemicals.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 07:39 UTC
In reply to:

maxmarra: this is what happens when you give everything you can in your product and then u have not much things left in your pocket for your future line up. people always complaint canon and nikon for taking away features that basically cost them nothing to including. I m pretty sure that there are lots of people out there which still using GH2 which is 7 years old camera with awesome 1080 60fps video capability and have not much solid reason to upgrade to GH3...or 4 or 5.
I believe their business strategy cannibalized themselves

Fear of cannibalizing yourself is just as dangerous, if not more so. If you don't cannibalize yourself, someone will do it for you. It's not like the GH2 sold like hot cakes either. Panasonic's problem really comes from never having been an A-player (despite good intentions), and now the market is shrinking.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 07:27 UTC
On article Juggling with one hand: Leica M10 shooting experience (495 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: My remembered experience from long ago with MMs. They were a part of me, and I hated the tunnel vision, and the blinkered vision you get on an SLR, hated it and could not cope for years.

BUT, in poor light you use the M rangefinder which is one square at the centre of the M's viewfinder, and you nail focus where you need it every time. Zone focus is for sunlit conditions: "f8 and be there".

You simply choose an aperture and set its distant aperture marking to coincide with the infinity mark on the lens barrel. Then everything is sharp from infinity all the way in to where the near aperture mark shows on the nearer distance part of the scale on the lens barrel, and as long as the light is good enough and you dont go too close (I think a 35mm lens gets you 10ft to infinity at f8), you need not focus again.

Thus the Leica IS the best and fastest camera in use, no autofocussing delay, and a clear view of reality as it is.

Focus peaking is great in more cases than a rangefinder. Automatic zoom in EVFs when focusing works very well too. Personally the old microprisms in SLRs we're my favorite (split view in the middle, with the same shortcomings as a rangefinder, with a ring of smaller splits around it.

Rangefinders are ok in some cases and terrible in others (to start with there's only one spot in the middle and it's best for nailing vertical features, so you often need to pick a spot, switch to portrait mode, focus, and then recompose. A sensible person will use AF when appropriate and it will be useful in more situations than the rangefinder.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 14:15 UTC
On article Juggling with one hand: Leica M10 shooting experience (495 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: My remembered experience from long ago with MMs. They were a part of me, and I hated the tunnel vision, and the blinkered vision you get on an SLR, hated it and could not cope for years.

BUT, in poor light you use the M rangefinder which is one square at the centre of the M's viewfinder, and you nail focus where you need it every time. Zone focus is for sunlit conditions: "f8 and be there".

You simply choose an aperture and set its distant aperture marking to coincide with the infinity mark on the lens barrel. Then everything is sharp from infinity all the way in to where the near aperture mark shows on the nearer distance part of the scale on the lens barrel, and as long as the light is good enough and you dont go too close (I think a 35mm lens gets you 10ft to infinity at f8), you need not focus again.

Thus the Leica IS the best and fastest camera in use, no autofocussing delay, and a clear view of reality as it is.

You can manually focus a camera with autofocus. Just a thought.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 15:49 UTC
On article Leica SL Review (1089 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: This review restores my faith in DP Review. Even less costly cameras deserve this frankness, even if their flaws sometimes are less obvious. Especially in the post truth society, saying it as it really is is very refreshing.

Few people aspire to Leica and, as far as I am concerned, with this camera they have done me a favour. I do not aspire to Leica prices, did aspire to Leica M quality in the days when we only had film. So now, I am even happier with the Nikon D610 I bought recently. There is nothing that suits me better at any price.

I do prefer optical viewfinders but if Leica have contrived to make the view through their EVF look like an OVF even in HDR lighting into the sun, then that would be real progress. However this camera is as heavy as mine without a mirror, so for most people what's the point?

Fair points. Actually it looks like Leica has managed to outdo Sony which is impressive just on its own — including being able to read the sensor at 11fps which is almost as fast as Canon's flagship.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 05:23 UTC
On article Leica SL Review (1089 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: This review restores my faith in DP Review. Even less costly cameras deserve this frankness, even if their flaws sometimes are less obvious. Especially in the post truth society, saying it as it really is is very refreshing.

Few people aspire to Leica and, as far as I am concerned, with this camera they have done me a favour. I do not aspire to Leica prices, did aspire to Leica M quality in the days when we only had film. So now, I am even happier with the Nikon D610 I bought recently. There is nothing that suits me better at any price.

I do prefer optical viewfinders but if Leica have contrived to make the view through their EVF look like an OVF even in HDR lighting into the sun, then that would be real progress. However this camera is as heavy as mine without a mirror, so for most people what's the point?

EVFs aren't there until you can burn out your retina by pointing the camera into the sun while looking through them?

Leica's problem is that they're a serious NIH company. They could just use a Sony 24MP sensor but nooooooo.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2017 at 23:55 UTC

Doesn't seem to be doing much more than making pictures brown.

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2017 at 17:26 UTC as 11th comment
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

Terry Breedlove: If they made a simple camera built like this one but with morecontrol buttons and dials. That is all I would ever buy. They take a great photo but are hindered by the need to dive into the menus to much or hit to many button combinations to control the simplest things. Such as shutter and aperture settings.

Again, no-one is talking about "doodling around with menus". The most retro of retro cameras has two or three extra dials that are equivalent to a button plus dial combo on the lowest end Nikon (and Canon) DSLRs. It's like arguing for function keys over using the mouse. Both work, it's just a matter of what you're used to.

Nikon and Canon do differentiate bodies based on usability, but it's things like the AF/AE lock button and instant zoom image review which are nothing to do with retro controls.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2017 at 01:04 UTC
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

Satyaa: The D3x00 and D5x00 are mass-produced commodities. It looks like they are just trying to run out all the series numbers ;)

My complaint is not about their abilities - these cameras are at the top of their game. Even the entry-level cameras have 24MP with no AA filter. They score very high on all tests.

Nikon is producing quick iterations with minimal improvements to the extent that potential buyers can lose interest. Owners of a 6-year old model in this series have no compelling reason to upgrade. If Nikon believes that there is a good reason to produce the new version to address a problem (publicly known or not) then they should stop selling the older versions (like the multitude of 18-55 lenses).

The bigger problem - my opinion, of course - is that they take away resources that could be focused on the next big thing (whatever that is) and QC continues to suffer.

The best thing Nikon produced since D810 is the D500. Everything else, the market could live without.

The target audience for these cameras is not avid readers of dpreview but folks who buy a bundle at a big box retailer or Best Buy. For such buyers it's important to have "a new model" to compete with the other "new models" like cars, which scarcely improve from year to year (well, we'll see now that self driving software is entering the mix)

I haven't used the D5 or D500 but since both have a highly regarded new AF system I think you probably need to include the D5 as well. AF is perhaps the single most important feature of a DSLR and Nikon significantly improved what was widely considered already the world's best AF system. That has to count for something.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:34 UTC
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

Terry Breedlove: If they made a simple camera built like this one but with morecontrol buttons and dials. That is all I would ever buy. They take a great photo but are hindered by the need to dive into the menus to much or hit to many button combinations to control the simplest things. Such as shutter and aperture settings.

I'm a bit confused by people who complain about this. A low end Nikon actually has great controls. In aperture priority mode the rear dial under your thumb controls aperture. In shutter priority it controls shutter. In program mode it trades off between the two. In manual you simply need to press a button to toggle between shutter and aperture. How is this "diving into menus"?

I've been using twin dial Nikons for years now and I still get confused by the way the second dial works. There are "retro" cameras now with direct control for ISO and exposure compensation which are things that were never easy to access in film cameras (for damn good reasons!) and that kind of control is nice in digital but this is just a button+dial combo on even low end Nikons.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:30 UTC
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

Old Cameras: In my opinion the main problem with this body, and the D3xxx series, is the small viewfinder. Optical viewfinders on DX cameras are already small but the prism finder on the D7xxx is acceptable. This was the main reason I bought a D7100. (Plus the ability to mount older AI lenses and the built in motor for AF screw drive lenses), but the smaller viewfinder hurts the user experience.
D3300/3400: 0.85x
D5500/5600: 0.82x
D7100/7200: 0.94x
D500: 1.0x
A D610 is something like 0.7x with a full frame lens mounted, but if you account for the crop factor it ends up being about the same or just slightly larger than the D500.
It makes a big difference to the user experience.

I agree and it's annoying that camera makers who could put a real pentaprism and a big viewfinder in a $200 film SLR decided to use crappy viewfinders as a price differentiator in $1000 DSLRs (Pentax being the major exception who put good viewfinders in at least some of their DSLRs).

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:24 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (424 comments in total)
In reply to:

Simon Elwell: Love that Fuji built something so iconic that it started a whole new genre of retro cameras and people are still buzzing about its fourth iteration - some pro, some con - but buzzing!

I think Leica is getting plenty of buzz for the M10 (and in fact gets plenty of buzz for everything it does). Retro cameras do get a disproportionate amount of buzz to be sure (cough, Nikon Df, cough), but I think the key to Fuji's success is that it makes good cameras and good lenses, isn't crazy expensive (as you point out), and the retro stuff is just icing on the cake. If Fuji made a good modern design side-by-side with its retro cameras (e.g. consider Leica's interesting but flawed TL cameras which were at least an attempt to create a truly modern camera) I imagine it would do well too.

Link | Posted on Jan 30, 2017 at 01:37 UTC
In reply to:

magneto shot: Same price as leica M10. now which one should we get? decisions, decisions.

D810 or 5DS and a bunch of Otuses and a nice trip instead?

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2017 at 04:59 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (424 comments in total)
In reply to:

Simon Elwell: Love that Fuji built something so iconic that it started a whole new genre of retro cameras and people are still buzzing about its fourth iteration - some pro, some con - but buzzing!

Um, Leica M8? Olympus Pen? Both predate the X100.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2017 at 06:13 UTC

The price is outrageous. Fortunately, there's competition (duet).

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 06:20 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Have your say: Best prime lens of 2016 (152 comments in total)
In reply to:

User3787089555: Why not Canon 35 1.4L II on this list???

It came out over a year ago?

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2016 at 15:44 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (556 comments in total)
In reply to:

FodgeandDurn: In a way this camera sums up all that is wrong with the industry in 2016. The specs are lovely, but they don't seem to have thought about the user/ownership experience at all. All around us tech is striving to blend into our lives seamlessly, and here we have another dull ergonomically flawed device with the same old complex work-flows.

When a camera finally arrives where I can shoot in RAW, immediately edit that shot on a high-resolution screen (either on the camera or immediately available on another device a la SnapBridge), and then share to anyone and everyone I want on all the hundreds of platforms we have available to us, then I will be impressed. The most exciting young photographers of today are on Instagram, and why on earth not?

I remember Steve Jobs explaining that the iPod was software. The iPod was great software first, hardware second, although Apple managed to inspire consumers on both levels. The next frontier of digital imaging should be revolutionising UX, not FPS.

@ottok — Apple's concern is security not developer convenience. Anything that lets an app change your network settings is a huge security problem. Again — a wired connection is the answer.

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2016 at 02:06 UTC
Total: 312, showing: 1 – 20
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