Tonio Loewald

Lives in United States Arlington, VA, United States
Works as a Consultant
Has a website at http://loewald.com/
Joined on Jul 25, 2005

Comments

Total: 282, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Zenmuse Z3 is DJI's first aerial zoom camera (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeinBKK: So, how many ways did they break the rules here ?
Did they even have a commercial permit and the required CASA license ?
The permit has a height restriction of around 130m from memory, and the Harbour Bridge is higher than that !
It also requires a 30m pedestrian exclusion zone ...hard to do considering the popularity of this tourist area !
DPreview, are you condoning illegal acts ?

How do you know the photo was even taken from a drone? They may have just bought a stock photo for publicity purposes, the way Samsung advertises its phones with pictures taken using DSLRs, or Intel's famous fly through the chip ads were made on PowerPC Macs.

Second, the photo was taken from WAY up. Assuming a 100 degree field of view for the wide angle and the length of the bridge at 500m, do some math and figure out how high the drone is.

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2016 at 16:07 UTC
On article Elevating X-Trans? Fujifilm X-T2 First Impressions Review (1225 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jostian: Can anyone from DPR (or anyone else) comment on the rubber cladding, I had lots of issues with the rear cladding coming loose after only a few months, not what I was expecting from a flagship, does the cladding on the X-T2 seem more robust? mine became 'mushy' quite quick and then proceeded to lift off the body (specifically around the rear thumb rest area). I loved the IQ and ergonomics etc. but the lack of build robustness (or toughness) was an issue for me.

How long is the warranty? I've had rubberized plastic deteriorate so badly on some devices (stored in perfectly reasonable conditions) as to render them unusable, this includes a no-name tripod and my Nikon FM-10.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2016 at 01:26 UTC
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (496 comments in total)
In reply to:

armandino: This New Standard gets a pretty lame score on DXO...

"and its most trivial use" — actually expose to the left is more versatile than ISO invariance. E.g. because the Nikon D5 is only ISO invariant beyond 800 you can expose to the left based on your knowledge of the sensor. (AFAIK that's what the D5 does for you anyway, i.e. it plays games with sensor output below ISO 800, and beyond that it just shoots at ISO 800, so you lose 1.5 stops of DR at base ISO, but gain 1 stop of DR above ISO800. So you don't need to know any of this, just as long as you ignore the ETTR nutjobs)

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 06:38 UTC
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (496 comments in total)

dpreview's scoring system has to be the dumbest ever. Ratings are relative to "other cameras in the category" and also within the current generation. What category? What generation? Is this camera better or worse than the D750? Or the D610? (Or even the RX10 or whatever other random cameras have comparable ratings?) One of the reasons people like DxO's scores (flawed as they may be) is that a better score is a better score. A lens released two years ago isn't graded on a curve. Personally, I preferred "highly recommended" etc. because it wasn't precise enough to allow you to ignore the review itself.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2016 at 17:43 UTC as 44th comment | 1 reply
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (496 comments in total)
In reply to:

armandino: This New Standard gets a pretty lame score on DXO...

"FOR AN AVERAGE CAMERA" that shoots 12fps with the world's best AF system.

Nikon puts its best sensors in the D5500 and the Df, neither of which are flagship cameras. At the high end, other stuff comes into play.

ISO invariance is, in essence, "expose to the left". It's the latest fad of the same people who were espousing "expose to the right" two years ago.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2016 at 17:41 UTC
In reply to:

Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul: More light loss, bigger, added weight and need to increase ISO or change shutter speed when use teleconverter that very great idea. face palm.

You do realize you can still stick this on a crop sensor camera. It's not like Nikon sells any serious DX format telephoto lenses (the most reach you can get is 300mm). The only thing this has over Nikon is the built-in 1.4x extender. Nikon's is an add-on extra.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2016 at 17:31 UTC
On article Virtual Reality: It's not just for gamers anymore (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Artak Hambarian: Current VR combining two challanges:
1. 3D, which faces non existance of good high res viewers, and I, as a photographer, care about this the most - I have been in stereophotography more than 30 years. I have done really stunning (for at least me and my friends and family) 3d macro and architectural shots that one can view over and over...
2. Interractive immersion via turning your head or by directing your sight. This is an entirely different beast, that in my opinion has some specific applications. I can see guided movies here.
I think these tasks should target different markets and shall be solved separately. E.g. the first task is relatively easy to solve by creating a 3d (stereo) digital viewer with really high resolution, e.g. 4-8 mp for each eye.
Later the audio related issues should be solved. BTW, its hard to see how could binocular effect be seemless when turning one's head.
I am waiting for the good 3d stills viewer, and not so much for the "interactive" experience.

We'll have to wait and see how well it works, but Facebook is claiming to have addressed VR in stereo with their open source pipeline:

https://code.facebook.com/posts/1755691291326688/introducing-facebook-surround-360-an-open-high-quality-3d-360-video-capture-system/

Lytro's far more complete solution does not appear to handle stereo.

Resolution is probably the easiest problem to solve, but it will require another generational improvement in both display and GPU technology (4K60 is pretty difficult right now and barely sufficient).

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 18:22 UTC
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (496 comments in total)
In reply to:

armandino: This New Standard gets a pretty lame score on DXO...

Suddenly Canonista's are keen on DXO and ISO invariance? If you shoot at fixed ISO 400 and use that as your base for ISO invariance then the D5 will perform admirably and allow you to adjust for a couple of stops of overexposure instead of only allowing for under exposure.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 18:05 UTC
In reply to:

ILoveAsianWomen: Why are TV ads perceived to have value but social media influencers aren't?

Because there's decades of data showing that they impact sales (exactly how is still something of a mystery). E.g. Pepsi decided to switch away from TV advertising (towards Internet advertising and social media) and sales plummeted.

Social influencers probably have value but it will take time to understand it. (TV ads are still not well understood.)

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 14:22 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

photomedium: Great camera in absolute terms but I handled at the store and it's way too hefty for me for an APSC and in my mind it has created the expectation for the D810/D750 successor.
I understand the price policies but If I have to carry the weight of an D810 and pay the money of a D750 I want full frame.

Obviously that's a perfectly reasonable point of view. Just like if I were going to pay for a DSLR and have something as big as a DSLR, why buy an RX10?

Camera heft and ruggedness are particularly important with larger, especially telephoto, lenses, which can vibrate on a less solid mount, and unbalance a lighter body.

That said, it's clear that Nikon grossly underestimated demand for a camera like this, and probably priced it based on expected low volumes.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 14:32 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lan Kasu: As a Sony user I must admit Nikon, with it's excelling D7200 and D810, almost become my brand of Choice if not because of a7RII's timely arrivel to derive my mind at the last minute. Even then, if oneone with a vast interest into landscape/ doesn't want petty mirrorless/ has a desire to burn through their cash stash, D810 is still my No.1 recommendation.

If you set out to go somewhere with photography specifically in mind then having a bunch of charged batteries is no big deal. But if you want a camera you can just rely on to be there and good to go, DSLRs are pretty much unbeatable. For that matter, if you see a shooting opportunity and grab your camera and the battery is dead, by the time you've switched in a fresh battery, the chance may be gone.

By the way, I carry spare batteries for my DSLRs… so are we talking 3 A7 batteries or 10? Also recharging lots of batteries is a pain in the butt.

I think the mirror less folks should design their cameras to work well with the USB bricks that smart phones and tablets have popularized — that will probably make the whole thing moot.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2016 at 16:01 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

Big Ga: Good info in the review folks. Well done.
One point - on P14 (the lighthouse shot), the D800 shot is fairly severely back focused. This doesn't make a difference of course when one is purely assessing the noise in flat areas, but if anyone is wanting to compare the sharpness of the non AA filtered D810 against the D800 (as I guess a number of people will), then the position of the default magnification box is going to give a very unrealistic result, as is looking at most of the foreground detail.
Check out the shoreline lights on the far right hand side and you'll see what I mean. Might just be worth making a note of that in the text!
Cheers.

Couldn't you simply add a naked lightbulb and a mirrored ball to your studio test scene?

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:48 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lan Kasu: As a Sony user I must admit Nikon, with it's excelling D7200 and D810, almost become my brand of Choice if not because of a7RII's timely arrivel to derive my mind at the last minute. Even then, if oneone with a vast interest into landscape/ doesn't want petty mirrorless/ has a desire to burn through their cash stash, D810 is still my No.1 recommendation.

I find the Sony A7 bodies to be very tempting, and IBIS only adds to that, but I know that in practical terms if I switch then 50% of the time when I reach for the camera it's battery will be dead.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:46 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

l_d_allan: This "Canon f.f. defector" to the a7Rii is always surprised to read posts from people who have switched or considering switching from the D8#0 family to the a7Rii. They may be disappointed.

Especially since the adapter situation for Nikon lenses is much less mature than for Canon lenses.

How happy are you with your defection?

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:45 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: Glad the 810 'rivals medium format image quality at ISO 64' since it is the size and weight of a medium format camera.

It's enormous. Every time I look at it I think; 'why is it so big?'
And; 'How come it's so big but it still doesn't have IBIS?'.

Nikon doesn't do IBIS for whatever reason. Neither does Canon though so you're basically left with Pentax. Pentax got its IBIS via cross-licensing with Olympus if I recall correctly (so did Sony) so it could be philosophical (optical correction is better in absolute terms, and also uses less power) or practical (Nikon has no tech to horse trade with Olympus).

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:44 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

mmurph: I have been shooting Nikon, Canon, and Sony side-by-side for 7 + years now.

I love my Nikon D810. The ergonomics on the pro body are also much better than on the D750.

But Nikon ergonomics still lag other manufacturers:

1.) There is no "Quick Menu " , that let's you change all major settings on the rear LCD, using only the rear control pad and "ok " button. I miss this from my Nikon D5300, Canon 7DII, & Panasonic G7.

The limited functions available on the "i" menu are all things that I don't change as a Raw shooter- D-Lightning, etc.

2.) Most function buttons cannot be reassigned, or have a very limited set of possible assignments.

3.) The AF mode and AF area can only be changed using the lever on the front left. Along with the limitations inherited from the mechanical lever in their lenses- like no aperture changes in video. Which is why Canon lenses are so much better for adapting.

The best camera ergonomically I have used is the Canon 7DII. I love the ergonomics!

The canon cameras require you to take your finger off the shutter to use one dial, and pretty much take your eye from the viewfinder to use the other dial. They also have randomly positioned power switches. The rear dial on canon pro bodies is ridiculously awesome for image review (and beloved of pro sports photographers all the more for that reason) but the basic shooting ergonomics of canon bodies irk me.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:40 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

mmrezaie: It is interesting that in DP says D810's ergonomics is great and Ken Rockwell says not and he hates it. I do not care anyway since I am amature and this camera is too heavy for me (street photography and D750 is better fit for me) but interesting thing is that ergonomic is very subjective. Can someone clarify if you can look at it and compare it with D750's different layout!?

A few years ago Rockwell decided to sell Canon instead of Nikon (more people buy Canon than Nikon and he lives on ad referrals) so it's simply a cynical gesture. He works out what sells and then helps people justify to themselves buying it. E.g. He knows pros aren't going to buy high end cameras based on his advice, so he tends to poo poo expensive cameras while raving about (surprise) best selling models.

Oh, and he's careful not to offend Nikon owners where he can avoid it, so once you start drilling into Nikon reviews he stops saying nasty things (about the best selling models).

His lens reviews are actually pretty decent.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:28 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1983 comments in total)
In reply to:

jorepuusa: I`m a photojournalist for 40 years. I have D800 and I had D200 and D100 and several other Nikons. Why?
Because of Nikon´s ergonomics. That is the main reason pros choose cams. When a pro shoots, he keeps both eyes open. The left eye looks what happens all around the area the camera is aiming at. The right eye checks framing. Together we see a slightly soft area where the framing is sharp in center . (english is my third language sorry bout that.) Keeping the left eye shut means the right gets wet and hard to use. Etc. many reasons.
For me the prism of Nikon is sufficiently to the left. Some faces need canon or others.
Reading these reviews, very little about ergonomics indeed. If one really uses the camera, the more handling means. Pros very seldom talk about noise etc. I`ve never done it and writers never talk about Word or their keyboard.
Couldn`t there be at least one professional photographer in Your team? So the really meaningful things could stand up.

Ergonomics is huge. To its credit, preview does at least discuss control layout and menus in considerable depth. Actually discussing the stuff that really impacts photography (vs technical minutiae) is why I like photozone's lens reviews. E.g. They take a lot of standardized real world photos (deliberately chosen for challenging attributes, such as corner sharpness, distortion, and so on), discuss differences in samples, show fore and aft bokeh and focus transitions, and so on.

Dpreview has gotten better over the years' the quality of the photography is hugely improved and discussion of important stuff improves all the time. I remember when we used to whine about the lack of low light sample shots, now they always take care to include them.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2016 at 16:25 UTC
On article Nikon D610 Review (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: It has a great sensor, however oil leak onto this sensor from defective shutter forced Nikon to decrease price to 1300$. I think Nikon will replace it with D620 soon, thats why it is pushing it forward with hidden advertisements like this one. And Nikon D750 will also decrease the price bec of Pentax I think.

The D600 got people hypersensitive about spots on their sensors, but the D610 does not, statistically speaking, have an oil spot problem. (I say "statistically" because camera sensors get spots on them all the time.)

Camera sensors also have bad pixels (and get more over time). Here's a link to someone complaining about spots on their 5D3's sensor: http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00bc9z

Check the replies — all cameras have spots on their sensors.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 03:47 UTC
On article Nikon D610 Review (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

User8952850599: how do you connect microphone to nikon 610 ?

Using the socket shown in a picture on Page 4 of the review.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2016 at 03:35 UTC
Total: 282, showing: 1 – 20
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