Tonio Loewald

Lives in United States Arlington, VA, United States
Works as a Consultant
Has a website at http://loewald.com/
Joined on Jul 25, 2005

Comments

Total: 303, showing: 1 – 20
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Doesn't seem to be doing much more than making pictures brown.

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2017 at 17:26 UTC as 10th comment
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

Terry Breedlove: If they made a simple camera built like this one but with morecontrol buttons and dials. That is all I would ever buy. They take a great photo but are hindered by the need to dive into the menus to much or hit to many button combinations to control the simplest things. Such as shutter and aperture settings.

Again, no-one is talking about "doodling around with menus". The most retro of retro cameras has two or three extra dials that are equivalent to a button plus dial combo on the lowest end Nikon (and Canon) DSLRs. It's like arguing for function keys over using the mouse. Both work, it's just a matter of what you're used to.

Nikon and Canon do differentiate bodies based on usability, but it's things like the AF/AE lock button and instant zoom image review which are nothing to do with retro controls.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2017 at 01:04 UTC
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

Satyaa: The D3x00 and D5x00 are mass-produced commodities. It looks like they are just trying to run out all the series numbers ;)

My complaint is not about their abilities - these cameras are at the top of their game. Even the entry-level cameras have 24MP with no AA filter. They score very high on all tests.

Nikon is producing quick iterations with minimal improvements to the extent that potential buyers can lose interest. Owners of a 6-year old model in this series have no compelling reason to upgrade. If Nikon believes that there is a good reason to produce the new version to address a problem (publicly known or not) then they should stop selling the older versions (like the multitude of 18-55 lenses).

The bigger problem - my opinion, of course - is that they take away resources that could be focused on the next big thing (whatever that is) and QC continues to suffer.

The best thing Nikon produced since D810 is the D500. Everything else, the market could live without.

The target audience for these cameras is not avid readers of dpreview but folks who buy a bundle at a big box retailer or Best Buy. For such buyers it's important to have "a new model" to compete with the other "new models" like cars, which scarcely improve from year to year (well, we'll see now that self driving software is entering the mix)

I haven't used the D5 or D500 but since both have a highly regarded new AF system I think you probably need to include the D5 as well. AF is perhaps the single most important feature of a DSLR and Nikon significantly improved what was widely considered already the world's best AF system. That has to count for something.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:34 UTC
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

Terry Breedlove: If they made a simple camera built like this one but with morecontrol buttons and dials. That is all I would ever buy. They take a great photo but are hindered by the need to dive into the menus to much or hit to many button combinations to control the simplest things. Such as shutter and aperture settings.

I'm a bit confused by people who complain about this. A low end Nikon actually has great controls. In aperture priority mode the rear dial under your thumb controls aperture. In shutter priority it controls shutter. In program mode it trades off between the two. In manual you simply need to press a button to toggle between shutter and aperture. How is this "diving into menus"?

I've been using twin dial Nikons for years now and I still get confused by the way the second dial works. There are "retro" cameras now with direct control for ISO and exposure compensation which are things that were never easy to access in film cameras (for damn good reasons!) and that kind of control is nice in digital but this is just a button+dial combo on even low end Nikons.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:30 UTC
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

Old Cameras: In my opinion the main problem with this body, and the D3xxx series, is the small viewfinder. Optical viewfinders on DX cameras are already small but the prism finder on the D7xxx is acceptable. This was the main reason I bought a D7100. (Plus the ability to mount older AI lenses and the built in motor for AF screw drive lenses), but the smaller viewfinder hurts the user experience.
D3300/3400: 0.85x
D5500/5600: 0.82x
D7100/7200: 0.94x
D500: 1.0x
A D610 is something like 0.7x with a full frame lens mounted, but if you account for the crop factor it ends up being about the same or just slightly larger than the D500.
It makes a big difference to the user experience.

I agree and it's annoying that camera makers who could put a real pentaprism and a big viewfinder in a $200 film SLR decided to use crappy viewfinders as a price differentiator in $1000 DSLRs (Pentax being the major exception who put good viewfinders in at least some of their DSLRs).

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:24 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (421 comments in total)
In reply to:

Simon Elwell: Love that Fuji built something so iconic that it started a whole new genre of retro cameras and people are still buzzing about its fourth iteration - some pro, some con - but buzzing!

I think Leica is getting plenty of buzz for the M10 (and in fact gets plenty of buzz for everything it does). Retro cameras do get a disproportionate amount of buzz to be sure (cough, Nikon Df, cough), but I think the key to Fuji's success is that it makes good cameras and good lenses, isn't crazy expensive (as you point out), and the retro stuff is just icing on the cake. If Fuji made a good modern design side-by-side with its retro cameras (e.g. consider Leica's interesting but flawed TL cameras which were at least an attempt to create a truly modern camera) I imagine it would do well too.

Link | Posted on Jan 30, 2017 at 01:37 UTC
In reply to:

magneto shot: Same price as leica M10. now which one should we get? decisions, decisions.

D810 or 5DS and a bunch of Otuses and a nice trip instead?

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2017 at 04:59 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (421 comments in total)
In reply to:

Simon Elwell: Love that Fuji built something so iconic that it started a whole new genre of retro cameras and people are still buzzing about its fourth iteration - some pro, some con - but buzzing!

Um, Leica M8? Olympus Pen? Both predate the X100.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2017 at 06:13 UTC

The price is outrageous. Fortunately, there's competition (duet).

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 06:20 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
On article Have your say: Best prime lens of 2016 (152 comments in total)
In reply to:

User3787089555: Why not Canon 35 1.4L II on this list???

It came out over a year ago?

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2016 at 15:44 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

FodgeandDurn: In a way this camera sums up all that is wrong with the industry in 2016. The specs are lovely, but they don't seem to have thought about the user/ownership experience at all. All around us tech is striving to blend into our lives seamlessly, and here we have another dull ergonomically flawed device with the same old complex work-flows.

When a camera finally arrives where I can shoot in RAW, immediately edit that shot on a high-resolution screen (either on the camera or immediately available on another device a la SnapBridge), and then share to anyone and everyone I want on all the hundreds of platforms we have available to us, then I will be impressed. The most exciting young photographers of today are on Instagram, and why on earth not?

I remember Steve Jobs explaining that the iPod was software. The iPod was great software first, hardware second, although Apple managed to inspire consumers on both levels. The next frontier of digital imaging should be revolutionising UX, not FPS.

@ottok — Apple's concern is security not developer convenience. Anything that lets an app change your network settings is a huge security problem. Again — a wired connection is the answer.

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2016 at 02:06 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

FodgeandDurn: In a way this camera sums up all that is wrong with the industry in 2016. The specs are lovely, but they don't seem to have thought about the user/ownership experience at all. All around us tech is striving to blend into our lives seamlessly, and here we have another dull ergonomically flawed device with the same old complex work-flows.

When a camera finally arrives where I can shoot in RAW, immediately edit that shot on a high-resolution screen (either on the camera or immediately available on another device a la SnapBridge), and then share to anyone and everyone I want on all the hundreds of platforms we have available to us, then I will be impressed. The most exciting young photographers of today are on Instagram, and why on earth not?

I remember Steve Jobs explaining that the iPod was software. The iPod was great software first, hardware second, although Apple managed to inspire consumers on both levels. The next frontier of digital imaging should be revolutionising UX, not FPS.

@Richard Butler: I think it's up to the camera makers to figure out how to make this stuff work; they've had a long time to do so.

DxO went with a hard connection to the camera, which is actually very sensible since in many environments (e.g. big sporting events) wireless communication is pretty useless (and will be even more useless as users carry more wireless devices around).

Personally, I think cameras should be sensor + lens/mount modules (with extra physical controls) that your smart phone can slide into like a battery case. A late model smart phone is comparably thick with the tilting screens on many cameras.

Link | Posted on Oct 8, 2016 at 05:23 UTC
In reply to:

martindpr: Beautiful tones, reminds me of my old bodies - the D2H line except for the slightly cooler blues which IMO need to be a tad bit warmer, like in Canon. The only thing that's missing in the APS-C is a fast normal prime - a cheap and simple design 35mm f/1.2 designed exclusively for Nikon APS-C.

A 35mm f1.2 DX prime would have the same DoF as a 50mm f1.8 FX prime — guess what, Nikon sells one of those (for $200) and it's superb. Exactly what market would the exotic 35 serve?

What I'd like to see is a small, lightweight FX body. There's really no technical reason they can't do one; Hasselblad has just shown off a medium format body that's smaller than Nikon or Canon DX bodies. (Obviously, it would have a thicker body owing to flange distance, but that's just air.)

Link | Posted on Oct 1, 2016 at 05:57 UTC
In reply to:

martindpr: Beautiful tones, reminds me of my old bodies - the D2H line except for the slightly cooler blues which IMO need to be a tad bit warmer, like in Canon. The only thing that's missing in the APS-C is a fast normal prime - a cheap and simple design 35mm f/1.2 designed exclusively for Nikon APS-C.

The 35mm 1.8 is very nice, small, cheap, and light. A 35 1.2 would almost certainly not be cheap or light.

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2016 at 14:42 UTC
In reply to:

Carl Mucks: It's huge for its 0.8x crop factor. It looks ugly. And it's likely behind every professional FF camera in every measurement. What to be fascinated about? -- Ridiculous price?

Fuji must have caught a Zika virus, how else to explain this microcephalic camera?

You can use a camera like this with FF lenses via adapter, and shoot square or FF portrait without tilting the camera.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 14:50 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (665 comments in total)
In reply to:

bluevellet: Canon M5 not even worthy to be compared to this real camera.

Feritol – Sony has on sensor phase detect on the A6xxx and A7/A7mk ii. Not dissing Canon, just pointing out that "dual pixel" is just branding tech that (ironically) Nikon came out with first (and then of course failed to use in its DSLRs).

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 15:35 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (665 comments in total)
In reply to:

zzzxtreme: i'm actually happy with these announcements. Digital Camera industry is (still) alive and well !

It's alive, but not well. We're seeing an explosion of offerings in a shrinking market: that's not health, it's desperation.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 15:31 UTC
On article Microsoft Pix aims to capture better people pictures (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: So Microsoft developed this APP for Apple and Apple only, but NOT for Windows' Phone.

It seems Microsoft thought Microsoft's Phone is hopeless, and should be dead.

BTW, all camera makers make remote APP for smartphone. but NOT for windows' phone.

Nikon flashes adjust their color temperature automatically? News to me.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 00:26 UTC
In reply to:

ZJ24: Dang, didn't see this coming. Looking forward to seeing user reviews, and good to see Nikon innovating.

It's a shame AF "rattles up" lenses in a couple of years. I must be lucky to have had zero AF lenses do any such thing in fifteen years.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 05:37 UTC
On article Zenmuse Z3 is DJI's first aerial zoom camera (53 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeinBKK: So, how many ways did they break the rules here ?
Did they even have a commercial permit and the required CASA license ?
The permit has a height restriction of around 130m from memory, and the Harbour Bridge is higher than that !
It also requires a 30m pedestrian exclusion zone ...hard to do considering the popularity of this tourist area !
DPreview, are you condoning illegal acts ?

Sorry, I missed part of what you wrote.

All they need is CASA certification, a flight plan, and a permit. Getting the certification is a 5 day course, and if I were a drone maker I'd probably think it worth my while to get some of my people certified. (Oh, and if you're a qualified pilot you may be able to skip the certification.)

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2016 at 18:04 UTC
Total: 303, showing: 1 – 20
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