babart

Lives in United States ME, United States
Works as a Pharmacist
Has a website at www.brucebartrug.com
Joined on Jun 23, 2008

Comments

Total: 531, showing: 21 – 40
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On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Unfortunately, it seems strange one would need the Canon or Nikon mount to mate to a Sony alpha. That means if you own a Sony you have to buy a Canon model Laowa to get the shift. Meaning one can't use the Laowa as 12mm without buying a Canon to Sony E adapter. Why not a shift adapter for the Sony E to Sony E? Or did I miss something in the text?

I understand about the need for the long flange distance (Nikon and Canon mounts) for the TC shift adapter for Sony E.

What I meant about a hollow tube SHIFT adapter, without any TC, would be to use the Laowa 12 in Canon mount with my Fuji X APS-C. There are shift adapters Canon to Fuji X on the market. I carry the Fuji X-T2 as backup when shooting architecture. Sorry if I didn't make myself clear.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2018 at 03:47 UTC
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Unfortunately, it seems strange one would need the Canon or Nikon mount to mate to a Sony alpha. That means if you own a Sony you have to buy a Canon model Laowa to get the shift. Meaning one can't use the Laowa as 12mm without buying a Canon to Sony E adapter. Why not a shift adapter for the Sony E to Sony E? Or did I miss something in the text?

Jens, Anticipation: Well, the problem then is the same for Canon and Nikon users.....if they want the shift capability they have to buy a Sony Alpha body. I don't see the reasoning there at all. So I'm suspecting that both of you are correct, in that the adapter was made for Sony alpha users, but that there is a problem with the TC needing a longer flange length lens. As for hollow shift adapters, these would only work with APS-C mirrorless cameras. That said, however, since I shoot architecture, next time I just have $1300 burning a hole in my pocket.......I also shoot Fuji. And I'd love the 12mm for my Sony a7. Let's see, where can I get that 1300....

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2018 at 00:08 UTC
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Unfortunately, it seems strange one would need the Canon or Nikon mount to mate to a Sony alpha. That means if you own a Sony you have to buy a Canon model Laowa to get the shift. Meaning one can't use the Laowa as 12mm without buying a Canon to Sony E adapter. Why not a shift adapter for the Sony E to Sony E? Or did I miss something in the text?

Jens, I did think about that very situation. However the adapter has glass elements that could be arranged to accommodate the shorter flange distance of the Laowa 12mm? Maybe not. Of course, the MC11 is very useful, but it's something else to carry to just use one lens......a great lens though.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2018 at 20:02 UTC
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)

Unfortunately, it seems strange one would need the Canon or Nikon mount to mate to a Sony alpha. That means if you own a Sony you have to buy a Canon model Laowa to get the shift. Meaning one can't use the Laowa as 12mm without buying a Canon to Sony E adapter. Why not a shift adapter for the Sony E to Sony E? Or did I miss something in the text?

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2018 at 14:29 UTC as 17th comment | 20 replies
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)

There are already several shift adapter for using full-frame wide angle lenses on APS-C sensors. These work well if the prime lens is a good one without much distortion. However, these arrangements are often limited in the degree of shift due to the vignetting of the prime lens. Laowa's TC plus shift, resulting in a 17mm shift lens is a decided improvement. I believe Canon still makes a 17mm tilt/shift lens, but the cost is much higher than this Laowa arrangement.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2018 at 14:23 UTC as 18th comment
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

MightyMike: I have the 12mm, I don't have the shift converter because I don't have a mirrorless camera however I found it to be just as effective to perform the perspective correction in post processing, maybe even better so long as you take your composition into account when taking the original photo.

MightyMike: Mike CH is right about the post-processing engendering distortion. I went to a mirrorless Sony alpha for architectural photography just for that reason. I have two shift lens, a PK 28 and a Rok 24 for interiors. The results are noticeably better than using post-processing. Too, one gets the image one composes, rather than guessing where the image will crop in PP. Nice to hear from you, bbartrug.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2018 at 14:17 UTC
On article Sigma introduces 70mm F2.8, first Art series macro (86 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: A bit short for full-frame. A 100/4 in the near future?

I have a 90/2.8 from Tamron. I suggested the f/4 as it would keep the size smallish and who uses a macro at f/2.8 anyway? :)

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2018 at 22:50 UTC
On article Sigma introduces 70mm F2.8, first Art series macro (86 comments in total)

A bit short for full-frame. A 100/4 in the near future?

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2018 at 13:29 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Aaron801: 5 x 4, I wasn't aware of that format. 4 x 5, sure...

O M G .

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2018 at 19:55 UTC
In reply to:

Jerry Ci: Like others have noted, this seems like an odd article for DPreview, despite the explanations given. Secondly, I was wondering how heavy it was. 1592g? What? I'm American. I'm not ignorant, but we simply don't use metric although I could do a conversion. My first reaction was to look up to the top of the article to see if this was a british website. No. DPreview is based in Seattle, but with a bunch of British writers. I thought good writers are supposed to take into consideration the intended audience. I've noticed this before with some Europeans. Please aim your articles at the readers and don't be angry that the US uses SAE or Imperial.

Many of you would not be surprised to learn that to some Americans, there is absolutely nothing beyond the US border.

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2018 at 19:54 UTC

Great job. Thanks for showing us the result, which is spectacular!

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2018 at 23:21 UTC as 17th comment
In reply to:

milkod2001: Completely lost in Fuji products names, way too complicated: X-E3, X-T20 and X100F models. Which is good actually? What about X1, X2 or E1, E2 etc. Wft is X-E3?

The "X" is just the sensor type, then E is rangefinder body and T is a rangefinder/SLR body. The number is the model sequence. I have the E2 (updated to E3) and the T2, which is simply an awesome camera.

That's another thing.....Fuji's updates are very useful and sometimes incorporate models that are no longer in production, standing by their customers in a way many camera companies don't.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2018 at 21:08 UTC
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: I think it's good news in general. I sort of like Fuji's model in that they aren't trying to capture the entire APS-C market, but rather see themselves as more of a niche for intermediate / hobbyist market primarily, and that their designs really mimic their intended target consumer... those coming from a film background who enjoy the dials and controls, and fewer menus, and for those who want the power of manual control in a retro, but sleek design contemporary design (software and functionality). (I haven't had a chance to try out the GF 50S yet however.)

Fuji has always been sort of a "niche" camera company, but not always just for niche markets. They produced a 120 roll film 645 auto focus camera series that had wedding pros selling their Hasselblads. They also produced some excellent fixed lens folders in the 1980s. Fuji lenses have always been superb, including their 4x5 models. For quite a while they made lenses for Hasselblad.

And yes, you wouldn't believe the easy shift to full manual control on Fuji models is to those of us who started with film. Clicking the shutter dial into manual instantly flicks one from aperture priority to full manual. A method that has its value in rapidly changing backgrounds like sports. Focus states automatic and ISO stays where it's put.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2018 at 21:03 UTC
In reply to:

Sports Shooter: Pity Kodak didn't develop cameras...well they did but they were flops .

The Retina series -- folding rangefinders -- was their only success. I still have the one my grandfather gave me in the 1950s. Still works, and fits in a Levi's pocket.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2018 at 20:51 UTC

Zounds!

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2018 at 23:45 UTC as 45th comment
In reply to:

babart: Sounds like another effort to hide military actions from the public. Especially when on considers what a small amount of money was necessary to support these units when compared to the enormous military budget. If there's a budget crisis, cancel one destroyer to be built, at the cost of 3billion dollars.

Suntan. You answered your question in the affirmative. What is there to complain about the military? They're so secretive. Thanks for the support.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2018 at 15:24 UTC

Sounds like another effort to hide military actions from the public. Especially when on considers what a small amount of money was necessary to support these units when compared to the enormous military budget. If there's a budget crisis, cancel one destroyer to be built, at the cost of 3billion dollars.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2018 at 02:50 UTC as 27th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

K1000usr: I don't know about the Bokeh of a $12800 lens, but it sure can generate a lot of snide remarks, hence the price! ;-)

Actually I was thinking of adding a snide remark myself, but after yours I'll just keep quiet :). Good camera the K1000.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2018 at 23:22 UTC
In reply to:

USSK: This may end up being my favourite lens!

I have always wished the 16-50 kit was a little smaller and a little wider. 18/27/35 are small but not versatile enough. 10-24 and 18-135 are big and heavy.

To all those complaining about the power zoom and size compared to Sony's compact kit lens: this may not tick all your boxes but having more options is always good - it's not like all 16-50/18-55 lenses will disappear overnight.

The price is also not too bad, considering Fuji's usual over-optimistic RRPs. I don't see this lens as a $300 lens coming out now, I see it as a $200 lens that I will buy in one year's time.

My thoughts exactly. This would be a great "kit" lens, especially for travel. However, the price is half that of the 18-55, and I suspect before considering purchasing this nifty lens I need to see some good test results. The 18-55 is a fine lens, and I'd like to keep that same quality in a short zoom.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2018 at 23:18 UTC

Wouldn't it be great if this lens were also available in Sony E and Fuji X mounts.

Link | Posted on Jan 29, 2018 at 14:01 UTC as 30th comment
Total: 531, showing: 21 – 40
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