babart

Lives in United States ME, United States
Works as a Pharmacist
Has a website at www.brucebartrug.com
Joined on Jun 23, 2008

Comments

Total: 374, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

ThatCamFan: I would also like to point out Reynisfjara in Iceland (the black beach)
People keep going there to close to the sea where we have worlds most dangerous sneaker waves.
Guess what they do? They won't just pull you out to sea. they will actually keep you down and drown you in a mix of water & sand and you cant escape even if you know how to swim.
We have people loosing they're lifes every year and people nearly being pulled out DAILY!

We have put up tons of signs and even giant ones and people keep ignoring them, if you get pulled out NOBODY is trying to save you.

Yes, the black sand is unique, and the coastline at that site is quite lovely.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2017 at 23:12 UTC
In reply to:

ThatCamFan: I would also like to point out Reynisfjara in Iceland (the black beach)
People keep going there to close to the sea where we have worlds most dangerous sneaker waves.
Guess what they do? They won't just pull you out to sea. they will actually keep you down and drown you in a mix of water & sand and you cant escape even if you know how to swim.
We have people loosing they're lifes every year and people nearly being pulled out DAILY!

We have put up tons of signs and even giant ones and people keep ignoring them, if you get pulled out NOBODY is trying to save you.

Average temperatures can be misleading, especially for an island at 66 N latitude. The temp today in Reykjavic is 40 degrees F. The southern coast is influenced by the gulf stream, while the northern half is more Arctic. The "average" temp for Iceland is influenced by the higher altitude of much of the interior.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2017 at 21:40 UTC
In reply to:

ThatCamFan: I would also like to point out Reynisfjara in Iceland (the black beach)
People keep going there to close to the sea where we have worlds most dangerous sneaker waves.
Guess what they do? They won't just pull you out to sea. they will actually keep you down and drown you in a mix of water & sand and you cant escape even if you know how to swim.
We have people loosing they're lifes every year and people nearly being pulled out DAILY!

We have put up tons of signs and even giant ones and people keep ignoring them, if you get pulled out NOBODY is trying to save you.

Yes, top ten beach because of the black sand. The water temp in summer is similar to many beaches in Maine.....50 to 55 Farenheit....due to the Gulf Stream. But swimming and sunning isn't the draw.

Good they put up the signs. The same is possible along the Maine coast, as years ago seven people were dumped off a prominent high rock just off of Pemaquid Point. All were rescued as the rock isn't that close to the water at lower tides. But being rolled around in mussel beds can cause numerous wounds.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2017 at 21:32 UTC
In reply to:

ThatCamFan: I would also like to point out Reynisfjara in Iceland (the black beach)
People keep going there to close to the sea where we have worlds most dangerous sneaker waves.
Guess what they do? They won't just pull you out to sea. they will actually keep you down and drown you in a mix of water & sand and you cant escape even if you know how to swim.
We have people loosing they're lifes every year and people nearly being pulled out DAILY!

We have put up tons of signs and even giant ones and people keep ignoring them, if you get pulled out NOBODY is trying to save you.

The black beach is near Vik on the southern coast of Iceland. It's labeled as one of the "top ten beaches in the world" by more than one travel company/magazine/wesbsite. I've been there and it really is quite interesting, and great for photography as there are intricate caves in the bluffs near the shoreline. It's black because the sand is fine lava particles. There are no signs warning of horrific waves, however. That could be because the residents of Vik know to get to high ground should the volcano/earthquake siren go off.....a volcanic eruption under the nearby ice sheet would send tons of ice, water, mud, and debris down to the coast, and a resulting tsunami might destroy the lower reaches of the town. Such an eruption a few decades ago destroyed the road along the coast, sweeping away all the bridges. Iceland is an interesting place in many ways.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2017 at 14:14 UTC
In reply to:

babart: I bought a Fuji GA645 for less than $500 a few years ago, so if it's a Fuji film camera you need, there's a option. It works very well, and the vertical format is great for architecture and portraits. The 6x7 format in folding cameras wasn't around too long for some reason......I remember wanting one but couldn't afford it at the time, as I was more into 4x5 and couldn't afford both.

Yes. I realized that, and still have a 6x9 roll film adapter for my 4x5. I was talking more in dollars than image size. 645 is still quite useful.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 19:50 UTC

I bought a Fuji GA645 for less than $500 a few years ago, so if it's a Fuji film camera you need, there's a option. It works very well, and the vertical format is great for architecture and portraits. The 6x7 format in folding cameras wasn't around too long for some reason......I remember wanting one but couldn't afford it at the time, as I was more into 4x5 and couldn't afford both.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2017 at 13:47 UTC as 39th comment | 2 replies
On article 2017 Oskar Barnack award offers €80,000 prize fund (55 comments in total)
In reply to:

quietrich: This is from a series of documentary images made in a very deprived area of north Wales, suffering from the decline of slate mining which was the economic foundation of the community. I did an article about this area some 15 years ago, so am familiar with the subject.
Clémentine Schneidermann's work focuses on the young girls growing up here, how their environment impacts on their identity, and maybe also the wider question of the space between the individual and place. You can see the project here: https://www.clementineschneider.com/images-1/
The many ignorant and crass comments below are valuable only as a representation of the insecurity and close-mindedness of those commenters. Perhaps shallow, ill-informed comments are the only way that some are able to address the accomplishments of such a talented young photographer, who has achieved more in a few short years than many of us can hope to achieve in a lifetime of photography. Shame.

Yes, I think a link to the whole series would be helpful, especially since it identifies the photographer's intent.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2017 at 15:15 UTC
On article 2017 Oskar Barnack award offers €80,000 prize fund (55 comments in total)
In reply to:

quietrich: This is from a series of documentary images made in a very deprived area of north Wales, suffering from the decline of slate mining which was the economic foundation of the community. I did an article about this area some 15 years ago, so am familiar with the subject.
Clémentine Schneidermann's work focuses on the young girls growing up here, how their environment impacts on their identity, and maybe also the wider question of the space between the individual and place. You can see the project here: https://www.clementineschneider.com/images-1/
The many ignorant and crass comments below are valuable only as a representation of the insecurity and close-mindedness of those commenters. Perhaps shallow, ill-informed comments are the only way that some are able to address the accomplishments of such a talented young photographer, who has achieved more in a few short years than many of us can hope to achieve in a lifetime of photography. Shame.

I'm sincerely sorry for the problems in Wales, and understand your distaste toward those who would trash this image and its photographer. However, if a photo has to be explained, it has failed in some way to reveal the photographer's reason for showing it. The young woman does look sad, mostly, but I wonder about the composition. I find the photo interesting in a way, the coat against the wall for instance. To me, however, it's missing something it needs to be considered a contest winner. I hope you don't mind my comments, as I don't think I'm "trashing" anything or anyone.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 23:27 UTC

One of the nice things about this lens is I'll never be able to afford it.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2016 at 22:29 UTC as 5th comment

Nice! Now where can I can dig up 3000 Euros?

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 16:19 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

scottcraig: I've generally stuck to extension tubes primarily due to the cost of Cannon Macro lens. However given the performance and price of this lens I may just make an exception.

Lan, above, is right.....the Canon 100mm macro was listed in the ten sharpest lenses by Foto, a European camera publication.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2016 at 13:39 UTC
In reply to:

scottcraig: I've generally stuck to extension tubes primarily due to the cost of Cannon Macro lens. However given the performance and price of this lens I may just make an exception.

I have an older version of this lens (whoa...with an aperture ring even) and the optical performance is quite good. Any improvements could only make it better.

http://www.photozone.de/pentax/362-tamron-af-90mm-f28-di-sp-macro-pentax-

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2016 at 14:51 UTC
In reply to:

babart: Is the optical formula the same as the older version with an aperture ring? I use that older lens with adapters on two mirrorless bodies and need the ring. Just wondering, as the new lens isn't available in Fuji X mount, although it is available for Sony E.

Image stabilization may change how some of the lens elements are placed and move, but that does not necessarily mean the optical formula would differ. I guess my question is rhetorical, in that I need the external aperture ring of the older model.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2016 at 14:48 UTC

Is the optical formula the same as the older version with an aperture ring? I use that older lens with adapters on two mirrorless bodies and need the ring. Just wondering, as the new lens isn't available in Fuji X mount, although it is available for Sony E.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2016 at 12:47 UTC as 23rd comment | 4 replies

What a great idea! Even if the user is just pushing through morning dew.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 12:17 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

John Koch: Two of the most common dreams are to fly or be invisible. Drones furnish both rather inexpensively. Could there be anything more exhilarating than a bird's eye view of things? Exactly what are people afraid that drones' fish-eye or fuzzy cameras will "see"? Isn't everyone already on Google Earth or Street View?

Drones are probably less obtrusive than many other annoyances. Yes, there are exceptions, such as use above crowds, but don't they also apply to ground-level photographers who poke about? Very strange how some people extol use of guns over use of drones or cameras.

Doesn't all photography involve surveillance? Other excuses ("art") won't convince the general public. It's all six or half-dozen.

Many DPR readers appear to side with the 18th century mobs that destroyed the Montgolfier brothers' balloon.

Of course, phone cameras (not cameras at all, say the snobs) deserve utter exemption.

You can't (yet?) fly a phone over your neighbors fence.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 21:55 UTC
In reply to:

babart: Drones intrude on privacy, so I think this a good change. In no way does it impinge on use of drones for many aspects of photography......real estate, landscape, scientific investigation. If a drone appeared over my backyard, unauthorized by myself, I would tempted to shoot it down with a shotgun. Unfortunately that would result in criminal charges for damaging someone else's equipment. Why are there no criminal charges for invading my privacy?

@jonny1976 Good, I say. If, for example, I climbed the fence into your yard and started taking photos of your pretty wife in a bikini sunning at your poolside, would you say I had a right to do so just because I own a camera? I think not.

By the way, just about everyone owns a shotgun where I live.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 21:53 UTC

Drones intrude on privacy, so I think this a good change. In no way does it impinge on use of drones for many aspects of photography......real estate, landscape, scientific investigation. If a drone appeared over my backyard, unauthorized by myself, I would tempted to shoot it down with a shotgun. Unfortunately that would result in criminal charges for damaging someone else's equipment. Why are there no criminal charges for invading my privacy?

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 13:40 UTC as 19th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: Imagine a time bomb being tied to a drone by a terrorist.......it is dangerous......every country must have control on purchase and use of drones........

This is about privacy, not terrorism.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 12:44 UTC
In reply to:

babart: "...it's a bit darker..." Umm, WHAT'S a bit darker: the lens, the auto-focus (how could that be darker?), or the images the lens produces. And if the latter, what does that have to do with the focus? Sorry, not trying to be a pain, you just threw a big curve ball. NO, I don't teach English :).

OK

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2016 at 12:32 UTC
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