babart

Lives in United States ME, United States
Works as a Pharmacist
Has a website at www.brucebartrug.com
Joined on Jun 23, 2008

Comments

Total: 348, showing: 1 – 20
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On article 2017 Oskar Barnack award offers €80,000 prize fund (55 comments in total)
In reply to:

quietrich: This is from a series of documentary images made in a very deprived area of north Wales, suffering from the decline of slate mining which was the economic foundation of the community. I did an article about this area some 15 years ago, so am familiar with the subject.
Clémentine Schneidermann's work focuses on the young girls growing up here, how their environment impacts on their identity, and maybe also the wider question of the space between the individual and place. You can see the project here: https://www.clementineschneider.com/images-1/
The many ignorant and crass comments below are valuable only as a representation of the insecurity and close-mindedness of those commenters. Perhaps shallow, ill-informed comments are the only way that some are able to address the accomplishments of such a talented young photographer, who has achieved more in a few short years than many of us can hope to achieve in a lifetime of photography. Shame.

Yes, I think a link to the whole series would be helpful, especially since it identifies the photographer's intent.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2017 at 15:15 UTC
On article 2017 Oskar Barnack award offers €80,000 prize fund (55 comments in total)
In reply to:

quietrich: This is from a series of documentary images made in a very deprived area of north Wales, suffering from the decline of slate mining which was the economic foundation of the community. I did an article about this area some 15 years ago, so am familiar with the subject.
Clémentine Schneidermann's work focuses on the young girls growing up here, how their environment impacts on their identity, and maybe also the wider question of the space between the individual and place. You can see the project here: https://www.clementineschneider.com/images-1/
The many ignorant and crass comments below are valuable only as a representation of the insecurity and close-mindedness of those commenters. Perhaps shallow, ill-informed comments are the only way that some are able to address the accomplishments of such a talented young photographer, who has achieved more in a few short years than many of us can hope to achieve in a lifetime of photography. Shame.

I'm sincerely sorry for the problems in Wales, and understand your distaste toward those who would trash this image and its photographer. However, if a photo has to be explained, it has failed in some way to reveal the photographer's reason for showing it. The young woman does look sad, mostly, but I wonder about the composition. I find the photo interesting in a way, the coat against the wall for instance. To me, however, it's missing something it needs to be considered a contest winner. I hope you don't mind my comments, as I don't think I'm "trashing" anything or anyone.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 23:27 UTC

One of the nice things about this lens is I'll never be able to afford it.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2016 at 22:29 UTC as 5th comment

Nice! Now where can I can dig up 3000 Euros?

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 16:19 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

scottcraig: I've generally stuck to extension tubes primarily due to the cost of Cannon Macro lens. However given the performance and price of this lens I may just make an exception.

Lan, above, is right.....the Canon 100mm macro was listed in the ten sharpest lenses by Foto, a European camera publication.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2016 at 13:39 UTC
In reply to:

scottcraig: I've generally stuck to extension tubes primarily due to the cost of Cannon Macro lens. However given the performance and price of this lens I may just make an exception.

I have an older version of this lens (whoa...with an aperture ring even) and the optical performance is quite good. Any improvements could only make it better.

http://www.photozone.de/pentax/362-tamron-af-90mm-f28-di-sp-macro-pentax-

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2016 at 14:51 UTC
In reply to:

babart: Is the optical formula the same as the older version with an aperture ring? I use that older lens with adapters on two mirrorless bodies and need the ring. Just wondering, as the new lens isn't available in Fuji X mount, although it is available for Sony E.

Image stabilization may change how some of the lens elements are placed and move, but that does not necessarily mean the optical formula would differ. I guess my question is rhetorical, in that I need the external aperture ring of the older model.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2016 at 14:48 UTC

Is the optical formula the same as the older version with an aperture ring? I use that older lens with adapters on two mirrorless bodies and need the ring. Just wondering, as the new lens isn't available in Fuji X mount, although it is available for Sony E.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2016 at 12:47 UTC as 23rd comment | 4 replies

What a great idea! Even if the user is just pushing through morning dew.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 12:17 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

John Koch: Two of the most common dreams are to fly or be invisible. Drones furnish both rather inexpensively. Could there be anything more exhilarating than a bird's eye view of things? Exactly what are people afraid that drones' fish-eye or fuzzy cameras will "see"? Isn't everyone already on Google Earth or Street View?

Drones are probably less obtrusive than many other annoyances. Yes, there are exceptions, such as use above crowds, but don't they also apply to ground-level photographers who poke about? Very strange how some people extol use of guns over use of drones or cameras.

Doesn't all photography involve surveillance? Other excuses ("art") won't convince the general public. It's all six or half-dozen.

Many DPR readers appear to side with the 18th century mobs that destroyed the Montgolfier brothers' balloon.

Of course, phone cameras (not cameras at all, say the snobs) deserve utter exemption.

You can't (yet?) fly a phone over your neighbors fence.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 21:55 UTC
In reply to:

babart: Drones intrude on privacy, so I think this a good change. In no way does it impinge on use of drones for many aspects of photography......real estate, landscape, scientific investigation. If a drone appeared over my backyard, unauthorized by myself, I would tempted to shoot it down with a shotgun. Unfortunately that would result in criminal charges for damaging someone else's equipment. Why are there no criminal charges for invading my privacy?

@jonny1976 Good, I say. If, for example, I climbed the fence into your yard and started taking photos of your pretty wife in a bikini sunning at your poolside, would you say I had a right to do so just because I own a camera? I think not.

By the way, just about everyone owns a shotgun where I live.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 21:53 UTC

Drones intrude on privacy, so I think this a good change. In no way does it impinge on use of drones for many aspects of photography......real estate, landscape, scientific investigation. If a drone appeared over my backyard, unauthorized by myself, I would tempted to shoot it down with a shotgun. Unfortunately that would result in criminal charges for damaging someone else's equipment. Why are there no criminal charges for invading my privacy?

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 13:40 UTC as 19th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: Imagine a time bomb being tied to a drone by a terrorist.......it is dangerous......every country must have control on purchase and use of drones........

This is about privacy, not terrorism.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 12:44 UTC
In reply to:

babart: "...it's a bit darker..." Umm, WHAT'S a bit darker: the lens, the auto-focus (how could that be darker?), or the images the lens produces. And if the latter, what does that have to do with the focus? Sorry, not trying to be a pain, you just threw a big curve ball. NO, I don't teach English :).

OK

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2016 at 12:32 UTC
In reply to:

babart: "...it's a bit darker..." Umm, WHAT'S a bit darker: the lens, the auto-focus (how could that be darker?), or the images the lens produces. And if the latter, what does that have to do with the focus? Sorry, not trying to be a pain, you just threw a big curve ball. NO, I don't teach English :).

I suspected as much, but wouldn't "a bit slower" be more to the point than "a bit darker?" The sentence is referring to the lens itself, not the images it produces. Never mind.

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2016 at 21:49 UTC

"...it's a bit darker..." Umm, WHAT'S a bit darker: the lens, the auto-focus (how could that be darker?), or the images the lens produces. And if the latter, what does that have to do with the focus? Sorry, not trying to be a pain, you just threw a big curve ball. NO, I don't teach English :).

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2016 at 13:02 UTC as 41st comment | 5 replies
On article Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art real world sample gallery (217 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul B Jones: Canon has a similar lens - but it goes to 11!

The question here should be, "How many people are there really that absolutely need this type of quality." I think one reason these ultra lenses are so expensive is that few people buy them. Especially since there's a weather-sealed version of the same lens for half-price that gets very good reviews. If I were a pro that specialized in landscapes and traveled to isolated locations, I'd certainly want the weather-sealed model that's lighter in weight. Not trying to be a pain, just saying.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 21:33 UTC
On article Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art real world sample gallery (217 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: Man 12mm is nauseatingly wide.

In practice, the 14/2.8 is useful for tight interiors and wide exteriors where one can't get far back from the subject. A situation not so uncommon when photographing 18th and 19th century houses and barns in Maine. The rooms were often small for easier heating with fireplaces, the stairwells cramped into narrow halls, and the buildings were put close the streets (or cart tracks). When the roads were widened, paved, and strung with power lines and poles, it makes a tight squeeze to get the facade in one image from the sidewalk, from underneath the power lines. There is considerable distortion, but it is correctable ....I use PTLens, but I'm certain there are others. With interiors, however, it's often necessary to crop the left and right edges due to the widening of doors or windows. Occasionally a tweak in Photoshop's Warp is handy. This lens is also good for night sky images.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 12:39 UTC
On article Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art real world sample gallery (217 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: Not that I am in the market for such a lens, but I hope it is at as non-distorting as my Sigma 12-24mm F4.5-5.6 EX DG HSM Mark I but really sharp to the edges on full frame. Otherwise, it is nothing to warrant such a name or price or the hefty size and weight. IMO lens sizes and weights, including this one, are getting to be lunatic, with many camera bodies not far behind even if they are beyond reproach on IQ.

@GlobalGuyUSA: You get what you can afford. Note the comment above from keepreal, who has the 12-24/4.5-5.6 lens, finds it's more than adequate, and wonders what justifies the price and weight and size on the f/4 model.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 12:30 UTC
On article Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art real world sample gallery (217 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: Not that I am in the market for such a lens, but I hope it is at as non-distorting as my Sigma 12-24mm F4.5-5.6 EX DG HSM Mark I but really sharp to the edges on full frame. Otherwise, it is nothing to warrant such a name or price or the hefty size and weight. IMO lens sizes and weights, including this one, are getting to be lunatic, with many camera bodies not far behind even if they are beyond reproach on IQ.

I'm with you on the size and weight, but would also add price. Precisely how many photographers are going to buy two or three $1500 - $2000 lenses? I realize a manufacturer has to have pro gear, if for no other reason to look good in glossy magazine ads. But how many pros are there compared to rest of us? (Note my consternation at prices is something of sour grapes, as I'm retired and been priced out of the market for some time.)

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 00:13 UTC
Total: 348, showing: 1 – 20
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