voiceoverguy

Lives in United States Dallas, TX, United States
Works as a radio/TV/film
Joined on Jul 12, 2000

Comments

Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5
On article 2017 Roundup: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (463 comments in total)
In reply to:

GDMitchell: The problem with all of these cameras is one thing alone. They are fearfully over priced and don't represent good value for money. Why anyone would pay over $1000 for any of these, unless money is no object to then, is beyond me. each one represents a massive compromise in that they attempt to fit a really high technical spec into a smallish case and really represent poor value for money. The large apsc sensors are welcome but 2.8 equivallent is not impressive. They weigh in quite highly too meaning that even though some fit in your pocket you really wouldnt want to carry them that way, maybe the Ricoh being the exception there. Too much development is being wasted on gimmicks when faster lenses would be more useful. I read about micro 4/3rd standard being possibly dead. If people are wasting money on these overpriced point and shoot models, then that could be true, but really there is so much good gear out there already, all formats could become obsolete unless we all realise an expensive camera alone doesn't produce a good shot.

(Part two of my response)

Finally, I don't understand why you are concerned with what you consider "gimmicks", and about the possible obsolesce of certain formats because "people are wasting money on these overpriced point and shoot models." In a free-market economy, people buy what they wish, for whatever reason they wish, often regardless of price or even quality.

You may regard these fixed-lens cameras as merely overly-expensive, sub-standard point-and-shoot cameras, but I feel that view is elitist. Many photographers find these cameras, pocketable or not (another of your highly questionable standards), to be either a useful single photographic solution, a welcome addition to their existing gear, or often, both.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 15:26 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (463 comments in total)
In reply to:

GDMitchell: The problem with all of these cameras is one thing alone. They are fearfully over priced and don't represent good value for money. Why anyone would pay over $1000 for any of these, unless money is no object to then, is beyond me. each one represents a massive compromise in that they attempt to fit a really high technical spec into a smallish case and really represent poor value for money. The large apsc sensors are welcome but 2.8 equivallent is not impressive. They weigh in quite highly too meaning that even though some fit in your pocket you really wouldnt want to carry them that way, maybe the Ricoh being the exception there. Too much development is being wasted on gimmicks when faster lenses would be more useful. I read about micro 4/3rd standard being possibly dead. If people are wasting money on these overpriced point and shoot models, then that could be true, but really there is so much good gear out there already, all formats could become obsolete unless we all realise an expensive camera alone doesn't produce a good shot.

(Part one of my response)

First, "...fearfully over priced." I'm not sure that cameras or people are full of fear over camera prices. Perhaps you mean that, in your opinion, these cameras are priced higher than you feel they should be. Value, like color and composition, is highly subjective.

Second, the Fujifilm X100f (for one) is •not• a 2.8 maximum aperture, but rather 2.0. Compared to some lenses that are "faster", 2.0 has historically been regarded as a nearly perfect aperture for most situations, at least in the 35mm (and equivalent) photography world. In fact, one the finest lens offered then and now by E. Leitz, is the 2.0 Summicron. I'd put that lens up against any lens in the world for sharpness and color/black & white contrast. Fujifilm's 2.0 lenses, while not quite as good as "Leica" glass, are almost as good in most respects, and at •much• lower price.

(Continued in part 2 of my response)

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 15:25 UTC
In reply to:

mosc: I thought this was the latest model for a second. They're killing the X100 series before I've become old and stodgy enough to want one? No fair! But wait, T isn't the most recent letter of the alphabet it's F.

100 nothing... first?
100 s... second?
100 t... third?
100 f... fourth?
what do we get next? 100 V for a poorly spelled five? Six is an X? Seven is an.. N? does nobody think this stuff through?

Elliot H, What you call "the same ole [sic] lens" is one, fine, versatile lens, especially for being a fixed focal length. Can't see any need to change it

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 20:05 UTC

Jony is a cool guy. He's clever, creative and conceptually in a league of his own, and I'm a big fan. Messing with Leica, however, is where he should have drawn a line. Not everything in life needs the Ive treatment.

As a lifelong Leica user, I believe the M series—at least the classic M-cameras, not the overly-expensive, underperforming digi-M's—are as close to perfect as possible in both design and functionality. But an Ive redesign of the venerable Leica M is nothing more than a status symbol for the fabulously wealthy, those who should already be contributing freely to fight AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis... without getting something fancy in return. It's something the fortunate few will likely put on a shelf, never having shot a single photo.

I'm fairly certain that a camera FOR art is why Leitz optician Oscar Barnack invented the 35mm still camera in 1923, not a camera AS art.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 03:17 UTC as 162nd comment | 4 replies
On article Canon Powershot S110 hands-on preview (107 comments in total)

Every camera maker will forever come out with a new camera every few months. The market is so competitive, do not do so would spell doom for a manufacturer in no time. With wi-fi, the S110 is simply providing another way to get pictures from here to there (which an Eye-Fi card does very well), and the touchscreen is another way to speed up an already fast way to take photos.

That said, I love both my S90 and S100. The Sony may have a "much larger and therefore better sensor", but when you can take a really sharp, colorful photo with either Canon, even at it's slower zoomed range, and then print a decent 11x14 or larger print, then you probably have a good enough camera… certainly considering it's much less money than the Sony.

One thing is true for Canon S models: there are few, if any other cameras you can truly slip into a pair of jeans or an inside sport coat pocket and barely notice it's there.

Sony would be nice; Canon suits me perfectly.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2012 at 15:49 UTC as 39th comment
Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5