photogeek

Lives in United States AK, United States
Joined on Nov 15, 2003

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Total: 428, showing: 1 – 20
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On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (541 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThorstenMUC: A 140W CPU and 295W GPU combination in a (big) screen... silently cooled... I really wonder how long this potent hardware can work full-load, before it needs to throttle, to stay within the thermal envelope.
You either need high-performance (loud) fans or a decend sized case, with good ventilation, to allow this hardware to use it's full potential.

Nicola: probably bad thermal design on the part of Samsung. Samsung is pretty well known for cutting corners without any regard for safety or reliability, sometimes with incendiary results.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 19:26 UTC
On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (541 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThorstenMUC: A 140W CPU and 295W GPU combination in a (big) screen... silently cooled... I really wonder how long this potent hardware can work full-load, before it needs to throttle, to stay within the thermal envelope.
You either need high-performance (loud) fans or a decend sized case, with good ventilation, to allow this hardware to use it's full potential.

Horse manure. That temperature is not high for chips. Put simply, they don’t care.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 03:26 UTC
On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (541 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThorstenMUC: A 140W CPU and 295W GPU combination in a (big) screen... silently cooled... I really wonder how long this potent hardware can work full-load, before it needs to throttle, to stay within the thermal envelope.
You either need high-performance (loud) fans or a decend sized case, with good ventilation, to allow this hardware to use it's full potential.

It doesn’t: that’s how the specs are for semiconductors. If it says the chip can run at a given temperature, you can design to run it at or below that temperature, no ifs or buts.

And that’s nowhere near the limit. Limit for the CPU internal core temperature 100C. This is the only relevant temperature for cooling: one that the CPU measured and reports itself. This is not where your CPU will die or shutdown or anything. This is where it begins to throttle. Limit (for Intel) for the case temperature is 72C.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 20:01 UTC
On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (541 comments in total)
In reply to:

fakuryu: You can actually spec an AMD Thread Ripper with 64GB DDR4 3200 RAM, 1TB M2 SSD, 12TB enterprise class HDD, 80Plus Titanium PSU, an AMD VEGA or NVIDIA Quadro, an aluminum and glass case, a 5K monitor and still have enough for a new FF camera and a trip to Europe.

Gonzalu: your rendering should happen on the GPU these days. Even the highest end $13k CPUs can’t hold a candle to an $600 GPU nowadays when it comes to such specialized workloads

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 19:05 UTC
On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (541 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThorstenMUC: A 140W CPU and 295W GPU combination in a (big) screen... silently cooled... I really wonder how long this potent hardware can work full-load, before it needs to throttle, to stay within the thermal envelope.
You either need high-performance (loud) fans or a decend sized case, with good ventilation, to allow this hardware to use it's full potential.

As anyone with an iMac knows it’s not silent when it’s running all-out. Fans do kick in. It’s not too noisy either, though.

Apple takes a mature approach to cooling by not cooling parts too much until it has to. You don’t need to cool most GPUs until their temperature reaches 85C. Same with processors, except there the temperature is even higher. Those are the operating conditions in which these parts were designed to operate indefinitely.

The benefit of cooling things adaptively, only when they are hot is the thermal gradient is high and you need much less air (and therefore noise) to reduce temperature by a degree. As long as your cooling system is capable of keeping the components within the temperature ranges outlined in their specs, everything will be fine.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 18:58 UTC
In reply to:

photogeek: Camera might be merely on par (I’d even say below par), but the lenses really have no equal. Once you use that it becomes quite obvious that other lens manufacturers are clueless about optical design and manufacturing. Sum total is, you get images with a unique look and characters. If that’s not worth the money, I don’t know what is.

Guess how much MTF matters to someone who views your final print? It doesn’t matter one iota. Fact is, some lenses produce more “keepers” per shutter release, and Leica just happens to design and manufacture entire series of such lenses.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 07:19 UTC

Camera might be merely on par (I’d even say below par), but the lenses really have no equal. Once you use that it becomes quite obvious that other lens manufacturers are clueless about optical design and manufacturing. Sum total is, you get images with a unique look and characters. If that’s not worth the money, I don’t know what is.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 17:56 UTC as 25th comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: National registration: because drones are so much more dangerous than semi-automatic rifles. The hypocrisy is deep on this one.

At historical timescale it’s not possible to guarantee that the government won’t turn into a dictatorship and start murdering its people. Several countries in last century alone had that happen to them, with devastating consequences.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 15:09 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: National registration: because drones are so much more dangerous than semi-automatic rifles. The hypocrisy is deep on this one.

I admit I don’t understand liberals. One moment they say we elected “literally Hitler”, the very next they suggest that everyone should disarm. Which is it, folks? I’m afraid you can’t have both.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 03:57 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: National registration: because drones are so much more dangerous than semi-automatic rifles. The hypocrisy is deep on this one.

They can easily be more dangerous: just strap a bomb to one and drop it into a crowd. But just like with rifles, killing and maiming people is already highly illegal, and registration does absolutely nothing to prevent it.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 17:43 UTC
In reply to:

kelstertx: I'm just wondering where they get the authority for this? Sure, the federal territories (DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, etc) are private US property and Congress can make Acts that apply to them instantly without question, but as for the 50 states, I don't think there's a constitutional basis for requiring registration by people who aren't using them to deliver goods/services as commerce. If they were considered a firearm, it might be different, but then he's probably not submitting legislation that adds them to the list of "firearms" that must be registered (ie, 26 CFR 5841 / 5845)

Sidenote: seems like Trump is one of those people who grew up not understanding jurisdiction and constitutional limits, and how they apply to the states vs DC and territories.

Careful there pal, if you go down that path you might even conclude that Voter ID is a good idea too. In which case your liberal friends will think you’re “literally Hitler”.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 17:33 UTC
In reply to:

Carl Sanders: One thing learned, never spend too much on a single computer, it will be superseded and out spec'd within two years.

That’s not the case anymore. Moore’s law is dead, all improvements from here on out will be highly incremental.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 02:23 UTC
On article Olympus 17mm F1.2 Pro sample gallery (413 comments in total)
In reply to:

waldoh: Disregarding compression.

17 1.2 = ~35 1.2 (2.4 DoF) - $1199
35 1.4 FF = ~$1500
35 1.8/2-2.8 FF = ~$500

M4/3 is cool and useful in video and to shed weight but these prices are quite high.
I think I would take a small FF body with a slower 1.8-2.8 lens and rely on the sensor size advantages for any low light (non flash) photography.

Hell 23mm (35 equiv) aps-c lenses can be had for $400-$800. Same size body, bigger sensor, less money.

Yeah, I’m pretty sure. My Nikon 35mm f/1.4 was pretty darn soft wide open except in the center, and at the time it was lauded as one of the shapest fast SLR 35s ever made. It did not even come close to 35mm f/1.4 Summilux, which I also had. As a rule Oly PRO series lenses perform well wide open. It’s quite liberating to know you don’t need to stop down, and your lens is actually able to deliver what it says on the tin. Kind of reminds me of Leica.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2017 at 04:57 UTC
On article Olympus 17mm F1.2 Pro sample gallery (413 comments in total)
In reply to:

waldoh: Disregarding compression.

17 1.2 = ~35 1.2 (2.4 DoF) - $1199
35 1.4 FF = ~$1500
35 1.8/2-2.8 FF = ~$500

M4/3 is cool and useful in video and to shed weight but these prices are quite high.
I think I would take a small FF body with a slower 1.8-2.8 lens and rely on the sensor size advantages for any low light (non flash) photography.

Hell 23mm (35 equiv) aps-c lenses can be had for $400-$800. Same size body, bigger sensor, less money.

That FF lens won’t be sharp wide open the way this one is.

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 05:29 UTC
On article Olympus 17mm F1.2 Pro sample gallery (413 comments in total)
In reply to:

hmzppz: I would definitely buy it if it were 4 times cheaper. Now back to my precious Lumix 20 f1.7 mk1, which is still serving me fine after so many years.

“Cost a lot” is not the only problem this lens has, it’s also pretty large. Indeed with it on the camera the “small and light” benefit of MFT is kind of no longer there.

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 05:27 UTC
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Gary Dean Mercer Clark: This feature is going to be so useful when it is perfected.

That’s only because DPR sells your attention to Amazon.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 02:01 UTC
In reply to:

Gary Dean Mercer Clark: This feature is going to be so useful when it is perfected.

If you aren’t paying for the product, you _are_ the product.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 02:02 UTC
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Gary Dean Mercer Clark: This feature is going to be so useful when it is perfected.

Do you seriously think NSA doesn’t have a few dozen agents embedded within the company which tracks everyone online and gets people to willingly upload their private data to its servers? I’m asking because I have a bridge I’d like to sell.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2017 at 21:22 UTC
In reply to:

Gary Dean Mercer Clark: This feature is going to be so useful when it is perfected.

It’s already very useful for their ads team, and for the NSA. This stuff is sent to the cloud and stored forever.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2017 at 18:48 UTC

Dcresource was pretty good. I was sad about its demise.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2017 at 06:25 UTC as 41st comment
Total: 428, showing: 1 – 20
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