photogeek

Lives in United States AK, United States
Joined on Nov 15, 2003

Comments

Total: 639, showing: 1 – 20
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Google's side looks better to me on all samples except text. This algorithm is not designed for text, so it's not an entirely fair comparison.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2019 at 20:24 UTC as 27th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

samfan: Is the 50/1.4 basically a rebadged Leica? Otherwise that price, well...

Seriously with these prices, why not just buy actual Leicas.

I think it's rather the other way around: the Leica is a rebadged Panasonic at 2.5x the price. And Panasonic itself probably has lenses manufactured by e.g. Tamron.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2019 at 03:47 UTC
In reply to:

photogeek: Unique Californian logic:

1. 70s: ban logging for “environmental” reasons.
2. Trees and brush grow to outstrip the capacity of the water bed to support them. Trees die, get infected by parasites, burn.
3. ???
4. Blame Trump

Get ready for utility rate increases, CA folks. Of course a utility company will be responsible for some fires. Wires break down and fall, sparks fly, nature of the beast. It's best if those wires don't fall onto bone dry brush, and that brush does not ignite dried out trees.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2019 at 01:44 UTC
In reply to:

scokill: And Sony has a head start...hmmmmm.

That's not how it works, though, because stabilization is also frequency dependent. Meaning a heavy sensor might correct gross movement quite well, but not minor, higher frequency hand tremors. Back when I had OM-D E-M1, I had complete certainty that, in the absence of subject motion, the results would be excellent even with completely unreasonable shutter speeds. With full frame I'm never sure of that. Sure, I can crank the ISO, but even then I'm not sure if I will get a usable picture. IS is still a heck of a lot better than no IS, though, I won't buy another camera without it.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2019 at 02:29 UTC
In reply to:

scokill: And Sony has a head start...hmmmmm.

Probably limited by physics more than anything. That’s one heavy sensor to shake around. That’s also why MFT has much better stabilization.

Link | Posted on Jan 13, 2019 at 00:57 UTC

That's one thing I liked about MFT: never had a single visible speck of dust. I think it's a combination of a lighter sensor assembly (able to move a higher acceleration when shaking off the dust) and thicker cover glass (makes dust less visible). I wish Nikon and Sony took a page out of Canon's playbook and closed the shutter when changing lenses though. I dread lens changes every time I do it on my A7R3, and that's not a good thing if Sony wants to sell me more lenses.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2019 at 20:15 UTC as 51st comment | 5 replies

Just buy one of those cheap Yongnuo primes. They come with "effects" built in if you shoot them anywhere near max aperture.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2019 at 02:09 UTC as 34th comment | 2 replies
On article Sigma releases X3F Raw conversion plugin for Photoshop (92 comments in total)

Just release it as open source under a friendly license. Adobe and others will incorporate it, if it doesn't suck.

Link | Posted on Dec 25, 2018 at 09:19 UTC as 25th comment | 4 replies

"Upwards of $4K". So no Leica gear was stolen, whew.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2018 at 01:26 UTC as 81st comment
In reply to:

Hilifer: That’s it... I’m selling all my portrait glass. Oh, wait. I don’t have any. Except the next version will generate landscapes and bugs... and... and...

There are versions of this that generate landscapes, change night to day, vegetation to snow, line drawing to photorealistic object, etc, etc. Basically if you can come up with a scenario as a human, and if the right dataset is available, these things can do darn near anything.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2018 at 00:18 UTC

By 2020 this will be good enough to make presidential candidates "do" whatever the hell you want in photos and video. Similar (and even better!) technologies exist for voice. And I can 100% guarantee you the meme-magic crowd will have a lot of fun with this. This kind of invalidates photo, video, and audio evidence that would normally be shown to you on TV to smear or prop up a candidate. There are ways to detect fakes, but the public won't bother, at least not in 2020.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2018 at 00:11 UTC as 51st comment
In reply to:

Franz Weber: The whole video sounds like a Kickstarter project from somebody in the beginning of a learning curve, but I stopped watching when she said: “these products are made in America.“
Come on, really? That is too much to take.

I dunno. If it's a quality wheelbarrow and if it's not twice the price of the chinese one, I'd buy American. I'd rather workers in our country were able to feed themselves, rather than get their livelihood from me forcefully through IRS.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2018 at 02:14 UTC

This actually gave me an idea for how to help my wife with her handmade jewelry photos. I already have a 3D printer. Thanks, Kickstarter lady, best of luck to you!

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2018 at 06:33 UTC as 43rd comment
In reply to:

Franz Weber: The whole video sounds like a Kickstarter project from somebody in the beginning of a learning curve, but I stopped watching when she said: “these products are made in America.“
Come on, really? That is too much to take.

Why does "made in America" trigger you so much? I mean, I see that you live in Germany, but very few of these will be sold there (assuming her kickstarter is successful at all). She's mostly targeting US audience, and as a part of that audience I appreciate if we can get _any_ production capacity restored in this country. Just as, I'm sure, you appreciate German manufacturing.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2018 at 06:31 UTC

My cheap carbon fiber Sirui gets the same quality of pics. So thanks, but no, thanks.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2018 at 01:59 UTC as 26th comment
In reply to:

photogeek: I had an Intuos before, and I couldn't get used to the fact that I'm drawing in one place and image is changing in another, and with a slight delay. I think it's mostly the delay that made me abandon it. Ended up selling it on eBay. I currently draw on an iPad, and while not ideal, it feels much better to me. I suspect so would Microsoft Surface, but Windows isn't my cup of tea.

That could be it. I gave up after a couple of weeks of trying.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2018 at 07:38 UTC

I had an Intuos before, and I couldn't get used to the fact that I'm drawing in one place and image is changing in another, and with a slight delay. I think it's mostly the delay that made me abandon it. Ended up selling it on eBay. I currently draw on an iPad, and while not ideal, it feels much better to me. I suspect so would Microsoft Surface, but Windows isn't my cup of tea.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2018 at 22:21 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies

iPhone seems to have better skin tone, too. I’m impressed actually.

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2018 at 21:00 UTC as 106th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

D Gold: 27 years ago I was a skeptic. Then I took a contract position on a NWS , (National Weather Service), modernization project called AWIPS. I spent 4.5 years in Boulder and working with the Environmental Research Lab and our beta site in Norman Oklahoma and met many dedicated PHD scientists.

One in particular was the SOC, (Science Operations Officer), at the beta site I worked at where we tested all the new systems. He had helped develop some of the global warming theories of that time and lived in the world of science when it came to climate and meteorology every day. His explanations over that time helped me understand 2 things.
1. Climate change is happening and is going to be a real problem for humanity on a global scale.
2. These scientists do not have a political agenda, though the GOP has one. I was republican at the time but I realized I was wrong.

FWIW,

But the key point being made here is that 99.99% of the people who foam at the mouth about global warming (or against it) are NOT scientists, and you can see numerous examples of it in this very sub-thread: people seem to suggest that yearly fluctuations of surface temperature are causing forest fires, completely ignoring all evidence to the contrary. The entirety of the understanding boils down to faith, on both sides of the issue. As I said before, I do believe there is warming (operative word being "believe", I'm a scientist, but not in this field), but I'm _extremely_ uncomfortable with how politicized this field is at this point. This is not how you do science. Theories are put forward to be challenged. If no one feels comfortable doing that, that's not science, that's Spanish Inquisition.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2018 at 07:14 UTC
In reply to:

D Gold: 27 years ago I was a skeptic. Then I took a contract position on a NWS , (National Weather Service), modernization project called AWIPS. I spent 4.5 years in Boulder and working with the Environmental Research Lab and our beta site in Norman Oklahoma and met many dedicated PHD scientists.

One in particular was the SOC, (Science Operations Officer), at the beta site I worked at where we tested all the new systems. He had helped develop some of the global warming theories of that time and lived in the world of science when it came to climate and meteorology every day. His explanations over that time helped me understand 2 things.
1. Climate change is happening and is going to be a real problem for humanity on a global scale.
2. These scientists do not have a political agenda, though the GOP has one. I was republican at the time but I realized I was wrong.

FWIW,

>> season of below average ocean temps doesn't mean jack in regard to the climate

Unless it gets warmer, amirite?

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2018 at 04:21 UTC
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