Samuel Dilworth

Samuel Dilworth

Lives in France Paris, France
Joined on Feb 20, 2011

Comments

Total: 1083, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

D200_4me: We already know the at risk groups (the ones MOST at risk anyway). I think it would make sense to tell those people to stay home and only go out if absolutely necessary (or have someone help those people get what they need so they don't need to go out). Then, let the rest of us keep on working AND use some common sense about it (avoiding those large meetings for now, but ok to sit in your cube and work but wash your hands, etc, etc, etc...the things we already know to do). Some travel restrictions make sense (international)....but otherwise I see no reason to destroy the economy and many people's personal finances because of this. We survived H1N1 where 60 million in the US got it (over 265,000 hospitalizations needed and over 11k dead)...so I think we can get by this without shutting everything down. I think it just needs to be VERY targeted, like no mass gatherings at sporting events and so on...just for awhile.

Re Sweden:

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/business/sweden-economy-coronavirus.html

“Per million people, Sweden has suffered 40 percent more deaths than the United States, 12 times more than Norway, seven times more than Finland and six times more than Denmark.”

“What is only now emerging is how Sweden, despite letting its economy run unimpeded, has still suffered business-destroying, prosperity-diminishing damage, and at nearly the same magnitude of its neighbors.”

“In short, Sweden suffered a vastly higher death rate while failing to collect on the expected economic gains.”

What “worked out well” there? My Finnish aunt lives in Sweden and has complained bitterly for months.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2020 at 15:00 UTC
In reply to:

AshMills: I still rather like 1080p

Michael Almereyda shot large chunks of “William Eggleston in the Real World” with a decades-old toy camera. Resolution appears to be substantially worse than Quarter VGA. It’s a brilliant documentary.

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2020 at 02:24 UTC
In reply to:

D200_4me: We already know the at risk groups (the ones MOST at risk anyway). I think it would make sense to tell those people to stay home and only go out if absolutely necessary (or have someone help those people get what they need so they don't need to go out). Then, let the rest of us keep on working AND use some common sense about it (avoiding those large meetings for now, but ok to sit in your cube and work but wash your hands, etc, etc, etc...the things we already know to do). Some travel restrictions make sense (international)....but otherwise I see no reason to destroy the economy and many people's personal finances because of this. We survived H1N1 where 60 million in the US got it (over 265,000 hospitalizations needed and over 11k dead)...so I think we can get by this without shutting everything down. I think it just needs to be VERY targeted, like no mass gatherings at sporting events and so on...just for awhile.

I remembered this conversation as I read another news story about the Covid omnishambles in America.

When D200_4me and Aegon Targaryen, above, mentioned numbers of 11k and 10k dead respectively, that sounded like an unimaginable number of dead people. And here we are a few weeks later at 140,000 and heading who knows where with a bickering toddler at the helm.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2020 at 00:32 UTC
In reply to:

Old Cameras: I would ignore the wording of the press release, which actually paints a pretty rosy picture, and ask yourself what the sale of an unprofitable business means. It means Olympus doesn’t see a profitable way forward so they’re dumping the business, they’re giving up. The new company also wants to make money so they will do one of two things: invest and accelerate development with some kind of well reasoned plan to turn things around, or strip if for parts, sell it off and park the skeleton in a junk yard. If there was a reasonable way forward to save the business you have to ask yourself why Olympus didn’t just do that themselves.

Nonetheless, Olympus in the last few years has made a series of moves that seemed extremely dumb to outside observers and were proven to be extremely dumb on the market.

Just because the people who made those dumb moves (e.g. hulking cameras and lenses as if Olympus didn’t learn its lesson the last time) don’t see a way forward doesn’t mean there isn’t a way forward.

Micro Four Thirds cameras should be small, light, rugged, cheaper than larger-format cameras (both by inherently lower sensor and lens costs and by targeting lower costs, for example by giving up that last bit of pointless optical quality), GPS-equipped across the board with no exceptions or excuses, integrated storage across the board, far better smartphone integration (this is simple software: one smart person who has ever tried to use this junk can fix all of it in six months by instructing the software team to make the right stuff), etc., etc.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2020 at 16:55 UTC
On article Slideshow: 2020 World Press Photo contest winners (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jeff Greenberg: ===
Once again.
A single "token" American.
And no Albanians.

Jeff Greenberg has been going on about Americans and Albanians for a while. It’s either an in-joke or I missed some crucial context at the start of it, or both.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 22:50 UTC
On article Slideshow: 2020 World Press Photo contest winners (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nick Brundle - Photography: a bunch of quite depressing and ordinary photo's. There must be some better ones surely?

Maybe it’s not a coincidence that I think these are strong winners and that AlejandroI has a great portfolio on his website.

Both sets of pictures deal with the complex, intense, and, sure, sometimes depressing real world. They’re not banal, sterilised images of a clichéd fantasy. They show people engaging with the world even though they have fantasies in their own heads, too.

Which isn’t to say they can’t be beautiful. Some of these pictures are classically beautiful, such as the Algerian football fans, the Persian apple pickers, or the Belarusian woman in her flat.

Calling them “ordinary” is stretching the word. When did you last see a pangolin being killed or an IED exploding?

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 22:42 UTC
In reply to:

Sactojim: This photographer is lacking in common sense and decency. Do we really need to see photos of a burial ground? I don't.

We do. You do.

You just don’t want to, because it reveals unsavoury things about society’s compassion.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 07:14 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoFactor: This doesn't sound like an appropriate use of the law, as only the FAA (in the US) has legal authority for airspace regulation.

It’s a great quote but Joe didn’t need to post it a dozen times.

This convoluted, unsearchable, unchronological, practically unlinkable comments system is hard enough to follow without gratuitous repetition.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 07:07 UTC
In reply to:

semorg: Reading the comments. I know many of us are exhausted by selfish drone pilots fighting for attention on Instagram.
However, George Steinmetz is not that. At least I don't believe he is.

This is one of the biggest tragedies hitting the world and documenting income inequality from all aspects of it from getting care, getting tested to even burial part, is very important.

More and more the rich are setting up rules and using the police force to entrench their power and rule and the working class becoming weaker and more disenfranchised.

If you're providing images to the National Geographic and the images passes the editorial criteria, that's a good enough filter for me.

What is fake about this ghastly pit on an island dug by penal labour, dgumshu?

The problem you have with these photos is that they’re all too real … and shocking.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 06:04 UTC
In reply to:

Barlowephoto: Is number 6 for real? This is a grand prize winner?

Works better as part of the series:

http://www.carolrecord.com/portfolio/portfolio-items/me-too/

I had never heard about this ‘laptopogram’ process before, even though I’ve been around photography since before laptops were common.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2020 at 00:15 UTC

Three of these pictures have two similar subjects side by side and are so much stronger because of that.

I wonder why, exactly, that is.

Must try it more often.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2020 at 21:00 UTC as 8th comment | 4 replies

Has DPReview broken access to the JPG URL?

How do I view a picture full-size in an iPad browser tab without all the gallery display junk?

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2020 at 18:10 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

Peak freak: Zeiss clearly showing their artistic chops, where the photographers, judges and admirers are all in some higher intellectual closed loop.

Click on the Judges section to see the book-reading know-it-alls who chose these projects:

https://www.worldphoto.org/enter/zeiss-photography-award

Tossers the lot of them.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 13:02 UTC
In reply to:

Dusty-Lens: When awards were used to drive sales it was interesting, now when they are used just to drive propaganda it is disgusting.

What is the propaganda that these diverse pictures drive?

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 11:55 UTC
In reply to:

Brendan R: The composition in these is really bothering me. #3 for instance, the horizon off kilter, the head intersecting with the curb lines, the shadow cut off. Like, so many of these at least had the potential to be visually interesting but don't quite manage it. Ah well, more inspiration to go shoot and get better at my own work.....

cont.

The rotational symmetry of this scene is satisfying. Note that the wreath beneath the statue, which intercepts the horizon, has a parallel in the person’s head that intercepts the kerb line. The bush in the centre around which these elements pivot represents, nay, is, nature.

Meanwhile the main lines flow in favour of the human direction, not the statue.

Something to think about perhaps.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 08:41 UTC
In reply to:

Brendan R: The composition in these is really bothering me. #3 for instance, the horizon off kilter, the head intersecting with the curb lines, the shadow cut off. Like, so many of these at least had the potential to be visually interesting but don't quite manage it. Ah well, more inspiration to go shoot and get better at my own work.....

When the horizon tilts, we call it a mountain, the subject of Pan Wang’s photo series. Straightening the horizon would be a peculiar way to photograph a mountain.

Meanwhile, if you consider the composition of this picture more fluently there is much to enjoy. Never mind the cut-off shadow that results from more pressing compositional requirements. The balance in this photo both graphically and conceptually comes from the counterbalancing weight of the two principal elements: statue and human.

One is white, erect, facing toward us, the great arm stretching skyward. Pylons march out of that corner of the frame to represent progress on a grand scale.

The other is black, frail, facing away from us, walking stick prodding the dirt. The bag reveals mundane preoccupations.

And yet both wear the red neckties of communism.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 08:41 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: Hmmmm, hmmmm, not sure what to make of some of these....

For me personally, an image, other than a purely documentary one, needs to be able to stand on its own merit, without needing explanatory text. Although, the text can often *add* to the image, if it is informative and interesting.

Without the text, IMO most of these images have no meaning, no message, and little artistic merit. I'll just comment on 2 of them:

#7 struck me as unusual and amusing, quite a nice image but rather spoilt by all the pretentious twaddle in the accompanying text. Sadly a lot of photographers feel a need to indulge themselves, or to justify their images, with such gibberish.

#4, although not aesthetically pleasing, at least stands on its own merit. The message is obvious without having to read the text.

Just my opinion.

Entoman: I’m sure plenty of readers find merit in these pictures but don’t comment here.

I’m not a writer on photography and can’t do the subject justice, but I’m moved to comment because it depresses me that every time DPReview posts contemporary photography, the critics pan it without a moment’s thought or self-reflection.

It’s so unfair, especially coming from supposed photographers. If it isn’t trite landscapes or exotic wildlife, it gets loudly rubbished by oblivious commentators who should know better.

Meanwhile the three judges of this competition are absolute experts in the photography world, impeccably suited to choosing work deserving of our attention. All three spend their whole lives looking at, making, and thinking about images.

So how about giving the work they selected some close consideration? Engage for a moment. You might get something out of it.

Instead we get comments like “how boring”.

Not cool.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 00:17 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: Hmmmm, hmmmm, not sure what to make of some of these....

For me personally, an image, other than a purely documentary one, needs to be able to stand on its own merit, without needing explanatory text. Although, the text can often *add* to the image, if it is informative and interesting.

Without the text, IMO most of these images have no meaning, no message, and little artistic merit. I'll just comment on 2 of them:

#7 struck me as unusual and amusing, quite a nice image but rather spoilt by all the pretentious twaddle in the accompanying text. Sadly a lot of photographers feel a need to indulge themselves, or to justify their images, with such gibberish.

#4, although not aesthetically pleasing, at least stands on its own merit. The message is obvious without having to read the text.

Just my opinion.

Old Cameras: you can see some of the other pictures in the series here.

https://lenspire.zeiss.com/photo/en/article/zeiss-photography-award-2020-the-shortlist

And you should, because the award was for five to ten images with visual consistency and a clear narrative that aligned with the brief of “Seeing Beyond: Discoveries”. It wasn’t an award for one standalone picture.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2020 at 23:56 UTC
In reply to:

BinY88: How boring.

“How boring” is hardly a developed position. The guy scrolled through this lot in seconds and hit us with that gem, at no point rising from stupor. I’m encouraging him to try harder. You too. You can do it.

Boring is a specific charge that I don’t believe a human can hold against this group of pictures if they look at them intently.

The content – other people quite unlike you and yet quite alike, in environments at once alien and familiar – is inherently fascinating even if you dislike something about the form.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2020 at 23:29 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: Hmmmm, hmmmm, not sure what to make of some of these....

For me personally, an image, other than a purely documentary one, needs to be able to stand on its own merit, without needing explanatory text. Although, the text can often *add* to the image, if it is informative and interesting.

Without the text, IMO most of these images have no meaning, no message, and little artistic merit. I'll just comment on 2 of them:

#7 struck me as unusual and amusing, quite a nice image but rather spoilt by all the pretentious twaddle in the accompanying text. Sadly a lot of photographers feel a need to indulge themselves, or to justify their images, with such gibberish.

#4, although not aesthetically pleasing, at least stands on its own merit. The message is obvious without having to read the text.

Just my opinion.

Don’t know how you can look at these pictures and not feel something. Literally every one shows ways of living I have never considered.

Are you sure you’re looking at the pictures?

MyReality: #9 is not a single dancer but two women wrestling. The main clue is the two women. So sure enough, some of us aren’t really looking. You can’t expect to get much out of photography if you don’t look … and think.

Zeiss glass is more likely to be worth something in ten years than Peter Lik prints, but the prize would be more attractive as more cash and fewer lenses. Then again, it’s Zeiss putting up the prize so I’ll defer to them on that.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2020 at 21:11 UTC
Total: 1083, showing: 1 – 20
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