Samuel Dilworth

Samuel Dilworth

Lives in France Paris, France
Joined on Feb 20, 2011

Comments

Total: 736, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Apple planning to open imaging research lab in France (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

steelhead3: American corporate meets French way of doing business...Good Luck Apple.

As an anglo living and working in France, I can tell you the French way of doing business is broadly the same as the way of doing business in any other rich, capitalistic country.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 19:50 UTC
On article Adobe boosts Lightroom Mobile with Raw editing for iOS (60 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nobby2016: wow.. i bet we all will get rid of our desktops now.

more social media crap for the smartphone crowd.... that is where adobe sees the future. billions of smartphone users who don´t know sh** about photography or image editing.

and elia has not a single bad word to say about adobes new mobile app.... sure.
we all know tons of PERFECT products.
or maybe all this mobile stuff is just not for me and i am too old with 34 years.

meanwhile lightrooms development is slowing down to a hold.

It is not the calibration and profiling that is the problem: the latest Apple devices, and probably the better Android ones, come from the factory in a good state and have very stable displays.

The problem is using these displays in massively variable lighting conditions. It makes a mockery of calibration and profiling if you use the phone in full sun, the bus (as someone suggested), and then an indoor café.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 07:33 UTC

Photography for photographers. I think most of them are fantastic, because I’m a photographer. But are they not too inward-looking?

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 11:26 UTC as 18th comment
In reply to:

Jonathan Brady: I honestly don't believe that Canon PURPOSELY tries to limit 3rd party lenses and accessories from communicating with their cameras. I truly don't. What I do believe is that they don't care AT ALL, if they make it to where they don't. Which is fine. They don't guarantee that 3rd party accessories/lenses will work, the 3rd party companies do - so it's on the Sigma's and Tamron's of the world.
But... I do feel like at least a few people at Canon, Inc are LAUGHING THEIR B***S OFF right now! hahahaha!
Having said that... I'm glad my Sigma 50 Art works with my 5D Mark III :-)

“I honestly don't believe that Canon PURPOSELY tries to limit 3rd party lenses and accessories from communicating with their cameras.”

Then you are naive. It is in Canon’s strong interest to have articles like this one appear every now and then. Each time that happens, more people resolve to buy Canon lenses to avoid this mess.

These companies are extraordinarily cynical behind the scenes. They have a 30+ year history of not remotely caring about the user experience beyond its short-term effect on their bottom line.

This doesn’t mean that Canon won’t have a long list of excuses for this behaviour or that some of the managers and engineers will even believe them.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 06:58 UTC

I like the homage to Edison on the button, LEDs or not!

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 04:15 UTC as 96th comment
In reply to:

kimsch: Well at least we now know that the designer has one eye and no nose...

Not at all. The viewfinder protrudes far beyond the norm for an optical viewfinder, making this problem disappear.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2016 at 14:21 UTC
In reply to:

D135ima: 18-50 is very interesning. Its like pocket landspase mashine. 1" sensor is quite enough for " web masterpiece". I hope lens does not fail

The lens is everything. It’s hard to know what to expect since no-one has attempted something like this before. The high price and large size of the lens (even precluding the central placement of the hot-shoe) are good signs.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 14:03 UTC
In reply to:

rugosa: You have to be a real loser to claim you've already owned a camera that is not even available for sale yet! See above " Gear in this story"

The button is there though the camera is not even for sale. It shouldn’t be, since children and monkeys will press it, as we see every time a camera is launched.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 14:00 UTC
In reply to:

Dames01: "Unfortunately, the ring around the lens barrel of the DL24-85 is not customizable (same goes for the other DL's). It can only be used for manual focusing."

That is really disappointing... :-( would have been nice to be able to use to set the Aperture, Shutter speed, etc.

No!

Camera user interfaces are usually a complete mess because the designers try to give everything to everyone. Discrete controls should be encouraged and applauded!

I’d love to see someone at DPReview – most likely Richard Butler on past form, though he may have written that very sentence – relentlessly pushing for fresh thinking and better usability in digital cameras. It is so tiring to hear every simplifying design decision tritely and unthinkingly criticised when it may in fact be a very good thing.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 13:57 UTC

The DL18-50 is astonishing, but they’re all interesting. Success will come down to whether the lenses are as good as their paper specs.

Looks like Nikon is going to go down kicking! I didn’t think they had this kind of innovation in them. Good to see.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 09:57 UTC as 104th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Henry McA: A problem is the weird focal length of 21 - 30 mm on APSC. That´s not very useful, 16 - 35mm is useful, 15 - 24 would be useful but this is just a odd - why not use primes instead.

One reason is that such primes essentially don’t exist. There is even a dearth of f/2.8 primes in that angle-of-view range, much less f/2 models.

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2016 at 09:31 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (399 comments in total)
In reply to:

TFD: I fail to see the point of an $800 camera that you cannot slip into your pocket. If I want an $800 camera that does not slip into my pocket I will buy a DLSR.

I think IvanM’s question is also asked by others. Why does this camera, like every Canon compact for many years, but unlike every cheap SLR (including Canon’s) for at least a decade, have such poor shot-to-shot times?

It seems to fly in the face of Moore’s law and all the rest. Is it done deliberately to encourage SLR sales? Perhaps DPReview should badger Canon until they give a plausible answer.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 14:52 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (399 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: What is the shot-to-shot time in raw? I hope I didn’t miss this somewhere in the review.

To me, the shot-to-shot time is much more important than the continuous frames per second.

Thanks.

Thanks, Jeff. That is not nearly quick enough for me. I wonder why Canon has barely improved this key factor in responsiveness in so many years.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 08:22 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (399 comments in total)

What is the shot-to-shot time in raw? I hope I didn’t miss this somewhere in the review.

To me, the shot-to-shot time is much more important than the continuous frames per second.

Thanks.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 20:51 UTC as 113th comment | 2 replies
On article Readers' Showcase: Rob Kearney (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

sop51: Just look at Andreas Gursky's "Rhein II" or Cindy Sherman's "Untitled #96." Someone actually paid $4.3 million for Gursky's print recently, breaking Sherman's record of $3.9 million for the most overpriced photographic print ever sold. Can anyone honestly say those prints are any better than Kearney's work? I gave up trying to figure out what "great photography" is a long time ago.

This is a better insight into Gursky, albeit from 13 years ago: https://vimeo.com/17692722

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 08:59 UTC
On article Readers' Showcase: Rob Kearney (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: Let's keep some perspective. The young man shows promise. His pics show his efforts to "see" the picture. The processing leaves a lot to be desired. He definitely deserves encouragement and I wish him not to grow a gigantic ego

Read the text when you get a moment.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 19:54 UTC
In reply to:

Cihangir Gzey: Ball bearings used to avoid zoom creeping in long term usage and bigger screws are used for reliable long term operation. These items don't even needed to be mentioned considering the price of the end product. BUT, we are all so fed up to see disposable products which give away soul during warranty or just after warranty (car, camera, TV, phone, etc.), we get amazed when we see a product which has been put into shape properly. We need to see similar level of engineering quality from their cheaper lenses as well. After all, the main cost of these units are GLASS!
When you guess the labor cost of a glass element (which you don't see any here apart from the front element), these bearings, gaskets, injection moulded plastic parts mean nothing! :) Well done anyway.

Well said.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 13:07 UTC

Like the Egyptian pyramids, this one is built to far outlive its usefulness (which risks being terribly short, given the current seismic shifts in the camera industry).

Still, I applaud well-built things.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 12:31 UTC as 42nd comment | 7 replies
On article Apple launches battery case for iPhone 6 & 6s (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: The Apple site says it is compatible with both the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6s. If I had to guess whether DPReview or Apple got this wrong, I’d have to bet on DPReview. But what about a confirmation all the same?

There is no satisfactory way to design an add-on battery. This way is at least honest and probably ergonomic (making the phone easier to pick up from a flat surface among other things). I prefer it to the usual technique of faking a new back, which goes against all principles of good design.

Still, it is design by designers for designers. Surprisingly, the iPhone itself has sold well despite its similar take on design, but I am not so sure the sort of person who wants an add-on battery pack is the sort of person who likes highfalutin industrial design.

Swoopy curves do not make something ergonomic, whether that thing is a pen, a camera, or a keyboard. That Fiskars used curves ergonomically in a pair of scissors does not prove that curves are always ergonomic or that ergonomic product design must revolve around conforming to the surfaces of an imagined body shape. The last fifty years are littered with examples of this faux style of ergonomics.

I have never typed as quickly (over 100 words/minute) as I do on my Mac’s flat keyboard with short-travel keys. And you can pry my Magic Mouse from my cold, dead fingers: it finally put an end to years of repetitive strain symptoms inflicted by Microsoft, Dell, and Logitech mice, likely of the shape your IT guys smugly handed out to replace the puck mice (which I agree were dreadful).

Many Apple products are not just ergonomic but highly so. From time to time they make a dud.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 00:57 UTC
Total: 736, showing: 1 – 20
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