TrojMacReady

TrojMacReady

Lives in Netherlands Netherlands
Joined on May 17, 2010

Comments

Total: 1622, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: Good, but a little too late. The damage has been done (to their reputation). This is how it should have been all along, or just warn the user that the battery has reached the end of its life, but don't gimp performance. For some people, if they can get through an 8 hour work day without recharging, that might be fine. Many people carry around little USB portable chargers anyway...

Samsung phones (as far as I can remember) have had a Low Power mode too that you can switch on to save battery power (I believe the more recent versions of the iPhone have this too, or it became available in IOS 10 or something). either way, let the user decide (as they are doing now).

"Samsung 's low power mode has so much disabled including color!"

That's the ultra low power mode that gives you about a month of standby time... The regular low power mode has color and is customizable. It barely feels like a low power mode on the S8.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2018 at 08:26 UTC
In reply to:

Terry Breedlove: They need flashing bright colored neon update notes so that the people who are crying like little babies might read the damn updates before installing them. It was all spelled out in the update notes so pay attention.

This is false. The first update to throttle phones was 10.2.1 and nothing in the release notes hints at up to 60% reduced performance due to throttling.

It was only in a private event with a small group of handpicked bloggers that Apple claimed the update did the following too:
" Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone."

No further explanations and obviously, little critical questioning, because private event invites are rare and bad press means your access next year is gone.

That " small number" actually appears to amount to more than half the 6S users and one out of 7 iPhone 7 users, according to Geekbench stats with phones being affected by throttling. Unless of course.. a lot of phones are throttled while only a tiny subset actually have a problem that requires throttling to begin with. Whichever scenario you pick and choose to believe, it all ends up being more than a little shady.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2018 at 20:51 UTC
In reply to:

Dan Wells: The fact that this is Japanese domestic market data is highly relevant, especially in mirrorless. The smallest viewfinderless mirrorless designs sell MUCH better in Japan than in the US and Europe. Thom Hogan (I believe) had a breakdown on this a few years ago. EOS-M had significant market share in Japan long before the newer designs with viewfinders appealed more to Western tastes, and the Olympus EP-L line (also lacking a viewfinder) sell well in Japan. I don't know what the ultra-compact mirrorless replaces? small DSLRs? Phone cameras? Fixed lens compacts don't sell well anywhere... My recollection is that higher-end mirrorless sells about as well as a percentage of camera sales in Japan as anywhere else, but that total mirrorless share is much higher, with the difference being made up by tiny, low-end viewfinderless models that barely sell in many other markets
I don't know if DSLR tastes vary much by country, so the rankings of DSLR makers could be similar to their global ranks?

Thom who?

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2018 at 20:24 UTC
In reply to:

Dan Wells: The fact that this is Japanese domestic market data is highly relevant, especially in mirrorless. The smallest viewfinderless mirrorless designs sell MUCH better in Japan than in the US and Europe. Thom Hogan (I believe) had a breakdown on this a few years ago. EOS-M had significant market share in Japan long before the newer designs with viewfinders appealed more to Western tastes, and the Olympus EP-L line (also lacking a viewfinder) sell well in Japan. I don't know what the ultra-compact mirrorless replaces? small DSLRs? Phone cameras? Fixed lens compacts don't sell well anywhere... My recollection is that higher-end mirrorless sells about as well as a percentage of camera sales in Japan as anywhere else, but that total mirrorless share is much higher, with the difference being made up by tiny, low-end viewfinderless models that barely sell in many other markets
I don't know if DSLR tastes vary much by country, so the rankings of DSLR makers could be similar to their global ranks?

Mirrorless share (as a percentage) in Japan is close to that of the rest of Asia (but absolute sales are more than 3 times higher there).

That being said, Japan has rarely ever been representative as a camera market for the global sales, au contraire. It has usually been the odd one out.

Getting a hold of or spotting Canon M bodies in Europe or the US, is almost an exercise. So is spotting recent Pentax cameras. As an example.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2018 at 06:55 UTC
In reply to:

pelikansalat: Are you sure it's variable aperture and not two apertures for two lenses?

No, the S9 + is supposed to come with 2 lenses (of which one with 2 aperture values).

Link | Posted on Jan 13, 2018 at 01:08 UTC
In reply to:

RedFox88: What's the point of a variable aperture lens on a phone with a tiny sensor? Everything is already in focus all the time due to the very short focal length!!

So you never need to stop a FF 27mm lens down past f/9... Or maybe you would like to..

On my S8, even at f/1.7 I'd sometimes like a little more DOF (control) for some background sharpness with subjects closer to the camera. No, for non static scenes, software still isn't the full answer to that.

And stopped down, you can bypass lens aberrations that become an issue at f/1.5 and slow down shutterspeeds for daylight videos when desired.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2018 at 19:41 UTC
In reply to:

Ravilo: Call me blind, but I see about 1 1/2 stop difference in noise from GH5s to A7S II. Not bad at all, considering 4x smaller sensor!

Shame it has no IBIS, though.

That still looks to be roughly 2 stops, but I wouldn't judge noise in corners, because that's where light falloff (and possible under the hood correction) of lenses comes into play too.

This is the darkest bit and for all practical purposes, noise is similar at these (2 stop different) settings:
https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=panasonic_dcgh5s&attr13_1=sony_a7sii&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr16_0=6400&attr16_1=25600&normalization=compare&widget=585&x=-0.13327428744095426&y=-0.8670804085221829

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 19:33 UTC
In reply to:

Ravilo: Call me blind, but I see about 1 1/2 stop difference in noise from GH5s to A7S II. Not bad at all, considering 4x smaller sensor!

Shame it has no IBIS, though.

Depending where you look, up to 2 stops, which is exactly what to expect for a 4 times smaller sensor with similar efficiency per unit sensor area.

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=panasonic_dcgh5s&attr13_1=sony_a7sii&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr16_0=6400&attr16_1=25600&normalization=compare&widget=585&x=-0.1211135173217083&y=0.49073140083995287

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 16:26 UTC
In reply to:

AstroStan: That monitor uses Nano IPS and not OLED even though LG is the largest (almost exclusive) supplier of OLED TV screens (even Sony uses LG screens). I've read that OLED is hard to control and somewhat unstable (e.g. deteriorates over time) so maybe it is unsuitable for accurate monitors.

P.S. I had a Nokia Windows phone with OLED screen that was very nice (for a phone anyway). Now Apple is using OLED in its phone X.

Brightness is no longer a real issue for OLED and HDR, see OLED tv's supporting HDR, as well as phones. In part thanks to a lower minimum brightness.

There have been high end (Sony) video/photo studio monitors for many years though. The main reason they haven't caught on for the prosumer market is the cost vs rhe non OLED competition.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2018 at 23:46 UTC
In reply to:

CaptureLight: Thanks Apple.
Fast solution to address a problem most probably only perceived by a minority, although a vocal one. No company can satisfy all users at all times and might at times underestimate the need to be transparent with the solutions applied. Especially considering that part of the reason for Apple’s success
Is to simplify technology for the majority of the users.

Excuses for shady hidden performance penalties that are only an attempt to hide a design flaw (shut downs). And one out of 7 iPhones 7 is affected within a year, more than half the iPhones 6s. A massive amount of people affected, even with newer devices.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2017 at 08:11 UTC
In reply to:

ozturert: Quite obvious: Buy new Iphone and Ipads!
Battery is an excuse. They could at least give it as option but no, Apple knows better!
This is really cheating and should even be illegal (not sure about law but if a car company decreases my car's acceleration or top speed during annual service without telling me...).

One out of 7 iPhones 7 already suffers a serious throttling penalty after the iOS 11.2 update. How is that normal within a year?

None of my high end phones crashed during heavy load, even after many years of abuse. Only the battery life shortened by about 10% the first year, 20 to 30% the second year and 30 to 40% after 3 years. A hard imposed (non user switchable) and not communicated slow down to "protect customers", is just shady business. An attempt to hide a design flaw (too small voltage margins for the battery, relative to the CPU peak power requirements) by crippling the promised hardware speeds with a fixed software speed cap. Again, we're talking about huge percentages of phones less than a year old ending up with 30% to 50% less speed. An issue that was never an issue before.

Swallowing that pill and selling it as beneficial for consumers, is well past being brainwashed by marketing instant meals.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 21:37 UTC
In reply to:

A Owens: Although I am not an Apple guy, this sounds quite reasonable to me. And I wish I could replace my Nexus phone battery for $80! The only misstep Apple made here was not telling users of this feature in the manual or other literature.

Umm, one out of 7 iPhones 7 already gets crippled with a 30 to 50% throttling penalty. If I had bought one less than a year ago and a single update would do that to "protect my phone from crashing", I'd say the hardware had a faulty design to begin with (the margins of the battery being too small to provide the power hungry CPU during peak demand). Even before the shady business of not mentioning the issue to begin with.

That's not normal or reasonable in these numbers by any stretch.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

desertsp: Do we have any actual details? How is this different than the Low Power Mode?

We do, the Geekbench founder provided data for the 6S that shows more than half of the tested models being throttled after the iOS 11.2 update (no such slow downs on older versions) and about 4 out of 10 phones significantly (40 to 60% lower speeds). For the iPhone 7 that was about one out of 7 phones already too with a 30 to 50% loss.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 21:21 UTC
In reply to:

Steve Wilson: This article states "TeckFire pointed out that his iPhone 6s had become very slow, only to speed back up again after the battery was replaced". If this is the case, it has nothing to do with the phone being old, so why does this article repeatedly state Apple is slowing down old phones? My guess is that Apple hasn't changed their algorithm and they'll also slow down a new phone if there is an old, worn out battery in it. If TeckFire's statement is true, then this whole article should be re-written to say "Apple is slowing down iPhones as the battery gets old".

Geekbench statistics showed one out of 7 iPhones 7 to have been throttled down too by 30 to 50%...within a year of its release. That's rather significant for a relatively new phone. Never mind the fact that they tried to get away with the design flaw (too small margin for the battery to stay within the required range of voltages that the CPU requires in order not to crash) through secret throttling as a "fix".

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 21:04 UTC
On article Have Your Say: Best Gear of 2017 (203 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: I don't know how Pixel 2 ranked so high this year. Next to me I have a Pixel 2 XL that was delivered yesterday and my old iPhone 7+. I have just took picture of my lunch with both phones and Pixel's color is either really saturated or washed out (depending on screen setting) and always have a green cast. 7+'s photo aren't as sharp at center but better DR and color.

HDR+ is on on the Pixel 2 and HDR "on" on the 7+

... if you don't mind a yellow cast mimicking golden hours during peak sunlight and yellowish skin tones that often make people look like they carry a liver disease...

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2017 at 15:46 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1095 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Koerner: Actually, the conclusion is false. They rate the lens availability as equal, which is a joke. Sony only has a bare-bones lens profile, and nothing that can come close to matching Nikkor's super-telephoto lens profile. Not by a country mile.

The AF acquisition of difficult subjects decidedly goes to Nikon, while the 'eye focus' of Sony for human portraits is overrated.

To compare the functionality of the menus, etc. as 'even' is also false, as 100% of users favor this to Nikon.

They didn't even discuss the ergonomics, where Nikon wins by another country mile.

The tiny bodies of mirrorless, used on heavy glass, is an impediment, not a virtue. The claim of "less weight" is a myth, given the hungus glass Sony keeps putting out.

If 100 photographers were asked to hold a camera all-day, shooting top-tier glass, 100% would find the curved shape/grip of the D850 to be more comfortable and better suited to serious use ... than the thin/dinky, right-angled Sony.

I wasn't talking about a niche lens, I was talking about niche use cases of cameras. But if you insist, focusing on one lens, still proves my point about a general claim too. That goes for both of you. Reading is key here:

Attacking a conclusion about lenses, based on one's own use case (tele) and making exaggerated calls like these:
" Sony is only good for those with no real lens needs"

FWIW, the 100-400 is tele (including wildlife) and walks all over the 80-400, but let's keep focusing on that one other lens instead and call any attempt to reason an apologist...

Don't attempt to be one yourself and recognize silly claims when they stare you in the face.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 22:47 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1095 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Koerner: Actually, the conclusion is false. They rate the lens availability as equal, which is a joke. Sony only has a bare-bones lens profile, and nothing that can come close to matching Nikkor's super-telephoto lens profile. Not by a country mile.

The AF acquisition of difficult subjects decidedly goes to Nikon, while the 'eye focus' of Sony for human portraits is overrated.

To compare the functionality of the menus, etc. as 'even' is also false, as 100% of users favor this to Nikon.

They didn't even discuss the ergonomics, where Nikon wins by another country mile.

The tiny bodies of mirrorless, used on heavy glass, is an impediment, not a virtue. The claim of "less weight" is a myth, given the hungus glass Sony keeps putting out.

If 100 photographers were asked to hold a camera all-day, shooting top-tier glass, 100% would find the curved shape/grip of the D850 to be more comfortable and better suited to serious use ... than the thin/dinky, right-angled Sony.

"please note that the discontinued Nikon is still sharper than the NEW Sony"

They're pretty much within margin of (measuring) error) for maximum sharpness when stopped down but if you want to split hairs, the Sony is more consistent over the entire frame throughout the range, sharper wide open at 200mm and allows up to about half a stop more light through thanks to better transmission values. For which it was awarded with a higher overall rating, even on that 36MP sensor.

But that's not the point, since this is one lens (see my earlier comment). Many of the new lenses do outperform their Nikon counterparts, by a much larger margin. 100-400, 16-35, 50mm f/1.4, 24-105, just to name a few.
The OP just picks a niche that is his preference an/or style and concludes that the general review is wrong because for his niche they are not equal. Fallacy galore. Pick another niche and the reverse is true. In other words, you can't make a general claim based on a single use case.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 08:13 UTC
In reply to:

josh bailey: The eagle could be hurt pretty badly if it got any part of its body in the rotor. Animal abuse, glad it got shut down. Eagle sound distressed as it is standing on the guy's arm.

Just excited for his reward. For this type of drone, their testing showed no pain or damage for the eagle, for larger ones they have kevlar gloves to protect the eagle's claws and legs.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 02:52 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: Why not use the simplest and cheapest solution?

If a drone is endangering anyone, just shoot it down. The worst case scenario is that the government might have to compensate someone for their drone. And that would still be cheaper than training a bunch of eagles.

But wait. This happened in Holland. The police there are probably not permitted to use guns....

... and anything that does hit high and powerful enough in terms of guns, wouldn't be a great choice in densely populated areas (buildings.. people...), to put it mildly. VERY different from animal hunting.

I love it when people who have no knowledge of the Netherlands make snarky comments too.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 02:39 UTC
In reply to:

Life recorder: "Most of the mirrorless shipments are going to the Asia region, though, which still accounts for more than 50 percent of all mirrorless cameras shipped"

And we know last year with only a couple mirrorless ILC bodies, Canon outsold BOTH Sony's aspc AND ff mirrorless offerings in Japan.

Can Canon keep that up with only a couple basic models? And what happens to Sony next year when both Canon and Nikon enter the FF mirrorless market?

We can criticize Canon all we want, but they are still dominating everyone else.

Funny because some of the hardcore Canon loyalists in this very thread have posted Amazon lists as... exactly such "proof". You know who you are.

But it's not just Amazon, it's Sony's own words that back up their relative growth of success in the USA and the same message came from for example Lensrentals:
https://petapixel.com/2017/10/26/sony-now-popular-nikon-lensrentals/

Obviously, none of that, or anything for that matter, will ever convince hardcore detractors.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 23:29 UTC
Total: 1622, showing: 61 – 80
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