Guidenet

Guidenet

Lives in United States Orlando, US, FL, United States
Works as a Retired Corporate Photographer
Has a website at http://faithartsvillage.com/
Joined on Sep 27, 2007
About me:

I'm a 64 year old retired corporate photographer who has also been a software engineer. My academia is largely based on Vision and my dissertation was on Fluids. Much of my post work was involved in research mostly in the realm of massively parallel systems like BSP. I have a small studio and gallery which I enjoy on occasion. My specialty is bird photography, and I've been lucky to have had a few attempts published over the years. For the past twenty years, I worked for a large Fortune 500 company as their in-house photographer for the communications, publicity and care departments. I’ve also done their corporate meetings and events. As the company owns several television stations, making the opportunities endless.
I had to retire because I suffered a massive right side stroke in the spring of 2013. My small portrait studio and gallery are doing better than ever.
I have a daughter who is a successful Wedding Photographer. As I’ve embraced retirement, I've taken more and more shooting contracts, but only those I enjoy like the local little league baseball teams. I occasionally act as a cruise photographer for some of the cruise lines here in Florida when requested by organizations.
I also spend more and more time teaching basic photography for several resources locally as well as out of my studio located at FAVO (Faith-based Art Village of Orlando). As well as Photography, I am also a Water Color and Acrylic painter and enjoy recreating some of my favorite work in those mediums. Learning how to create art is a lifelong passion.
I'm seriously passionate about people learning exposure and the Zone System of Photography before considering themselves sufficiently astute in this craft. I’ve held several Zone System Workshops over the years as well as one Cruise based workshop. I’m also passionate about Ansel Adams’ ideas about pre-visualization. Pressing the shutter button and the camera are just one small part of the image creation process.
I started at eight years old in 1959 when my dad and I built a darkroom, him more than me. My father taught me the Zone System at a very young age. I continued as a youthful photographer, buying glass with lawn mowing money through my high school and then into college with odd jobs. I paid most of my tuition as an undergraduate shooting weddings and baby pictures as well as for the university newspaper. Many of those years I shot 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10 field cameras and sheet film. In small format, I shot Pentax until 1968 when I switched to Nikon, needing a better more professional system tool. I still shoot Nikon today as well as Nikkor lenses for some of my large format gear. I also mostly shoot digital but still maintain a darkroom for up to 5x7 format. 8x10 is stored in the attic and is only black and white. I even have a Nikkor enlarging lens. Over the years, I believe Nikon has been instrumental in the creation of truly great glass.

Comments

Total: 366, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

rz350: I have to stop reading Thom Hogan. With all of the issues that are reported by his readers to him, I would find it hard to buy one. On the other hand, if I were to go by DPR, I couldn't wait to get my hands on one.
Canon should fold their tents and disappear into the night if DPR is to be believed.
I must admit to be somewhat cynical as to the test reports being supplied by DPR. Have you secretly hired Ken Rockwell because your reviews are tending towards his except that he does seem to like what Canon has done.

@rz350 Don't be a silly goose. We have enough whiners whenever a new model of anything hits the market. I seems to me if your only complaints over this particular camera is batteries and a brand of SD cards, there's not much to worry about.

As far as Thom Hogan goes, he's in it for the same reason as the likes of Ken Rockwell, to get hits on his site. One way to do that is to spark and fan the fire of controversy. Then the sheeple come flocking about, each with their 2 cents mimicking the blogger. Why? I suppose it makes them "kewl." It happens like clockwork with every new release. Next we'll get the forum buyers, reviewers then returners, each with some negatives. The rest of us are photographers and out making photographs.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 19:39 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

rz350: I have to stop reading Thom Hogan. With all of the issues that are reported by his readers to him, I would find it hard to buy one. On the other hand, if I were to go by DPR, I couldn't wait to get my hands on one.
Canon should fold their tents and disappear into the night if DPR is to be believed.
I must admit to be somewhat cynical as to the test reports being supplied by DPR. Have you secretly hired Ken Rockwell because your reviews are tending towards his except that he does seem to like what Canon has done.

Rishi, I wouldn't worry about it. It's just some few Canon folks who must have Nikon envy or something. Canon might eventually release something new and those who live vicariously via their camera brand will feel better. Here, I'll go ahead and give the 7D MkII a "Guidenet Gold Award" to keep them happy in the mean time so they can move forward with their photography.

As far as the "Loose Ends" are concerned, Richard prefaced it with not at all being sure they were all bugs and much more testing would have to be done to see. Why bother when they are fairly small and will be corrected the same as any new camera does during the first update or so. It does give the whiners something to point at, though. ;-)

People forget the filter bubbles in some of the first T6i and T6s models. Now that's a QA issue. Or, how about the white orbs on the Fuji X-10 white orb issue? They get fixed, but it's the same with all the brands and new releases. This D500 seems pretty clean in comparison.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 14:37 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Keeney: Thanks for the review. I agree with the gold award and am an owner of both a D500 and D750.

I find it quite astonishing and am left in disbelief that the review kept hitting on the D500's image quality as "the best in it's class" but not drastically improved over the D7200. I could not disagree more. I've never owned the D7200 but have rented it and still possess RAW files from having shot with it. I must say that the D500 is leaps and bounds improved over the D7200 in high ISO performance. In fact, it's VERY close to the D750. It's color saturation is the best I've ever seen out of any DSLR, and I've owned plenty through the years.

@beavertown He's got a point. Why would anyone consider any camera at this level if they are considering SOOC default Jpegs? They would be spending a couple of grand to use it like their grandmother's point and shoot.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 16:00 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Camera of the year for sure. Poor Sony still doesn't know what they're doing with the E mount. Nikon shows everyone how it's done in the camera business!

@ttran88 So only Nikon has issues and does firmware updates. Fuji and Sony don't have that issue? Nikon, founded in 1917, is going to go out of business if they don't understand. Fuji's "White Blobs" and Canon's bubbled filter array are figments of my imagination.

The truth is, Nikon has been making professional grade cameras which, overall, are extremely reliable for the working photographer. They're used by war correspondents and NASA as well as many other fields of endeavor. These days, cameras are both complex to design and manufacture and all companies have had to raise the bar and we tend to insist Nikon maintain a very high level because we make our living with them.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 15:51 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Retro1976: Ugh Nikon colors are terrible.

Ok, let's figure this out, because fanboys just don't get it. For starters, Nikon uses sensors they've designed and are often fabbed on their steppers by the likes of Sony, Toshiba and others, not just Sony. Some Nikon sensors are off the shelf Sony but only some. Some are pure Nikon. Right away, that should point out the fallacy of trying to claim color attributes to a brand.

A sensor captures the numeric values of the bayer filter array, red, green and blue and stores it. Software by Canon, Nikon, Photoshop ACR, Capture One, etc, then renders an image based on that software's rendering engine. It's what decides what colors to apply, not the camera or brand of camera.

So, my Nikon D3S with it's Nikon designed and fabbed sensor is used with Adobe Camera RAW rendering, I then use the software to detail final output & color. This is a digital, not some older analog film simulation where you might like or dislike colors. You have to take responsibility for the output. It's up to you.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 15:16 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: I think the review should be drawing a negative conclusion about Nikon's failure to implement any kind of IBIS.

The technology is mature and has been present in DSLRs from other manufacturers in some cases for some more than ten years. Nikon don't even have the excuse that that they're using a FF sensor and the body is very large.

How about most of us jobbing professionals don't give a whit about IBIS and the reviewers know that. These upper level Nikon and Canon models are designed and primarily marketed to us. For me, I much prefer the qualities of optical stabilization when and if I use it at all. Mostly, IS/VR defaults to Off regardless how one implements it.

You might like IBIS and that's fine, but don't project as to the wants and needs of photographers who tend to spend $2000-$7000 on cameras to make a living.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 12:28 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

JunzInc: And now I am hoping for an 'Epic AF shoot' out between cameras like Nikon D500, Samsung NX1, Sony A6300, Canon 7DII, Olympus EM1 under Good light and Low light.

It would seem to me DPR did a epic AF shootout in the above review. Secondly, including a camera like any Samsung NX would be counter productive as Samsung seems to be getting out of the NX lineup by discontinuing all the NX cameras. Looks like the NX lens lineup will also never get fleshed out. It's really too bad as the camera line wasn't a bad choice if you didn't need a full system of glass and accessories. You can't really consider it for a shootout or even a roundup. Waste of time.

I remember at the time of the NX1 review, potential buyers should consider the commitment of Samsung as well as a lack of legacy. You buy into a system and there wasn't a system to buy into. Just one more orphan lens mount. They should have borrowed NIkon, Sony or Pentax's lens mount instead of trying to introduce a new mount. Live and learn.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 12:12 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deliverator: Ken Rockwell is reporting inconsistent metering exposure as well as flash exposures (he generally shoots in Program Mode, IIRC), is anyone else seeing this?

@vanboven Either you're new or uninformed. Ken Rockwell is pretty much a fraud. It's no longer there, but in his own "about" pages in the past, he admits his website is a practical joke and he made it for fun and other members of his photo club. Later, he found people took links from his site and he could make money at it. He cleaned it up, but it's still non-information. I'd bet he doesn't have nor ever will have the camera in question, so any speculation as to his supposed observations might be 100% tomato fertilizer. Remember, every remark made on his website is there to gain readership and therefore click-through to the camera stores.

His opinions can be informative for new folks, but not his supposed testing and reviews. Those opinions though, are just that, Ken's opinions and many real professional photographers disagree with them. His "alerts" are more often than not, just something someone told him or he read on the forums.

There's your gold plated, informed reaction. ;-)

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 10:30 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deliverator: Ken Rockwell is reporting inconsistent metering exposure as well as flash exposures (he generally shoots in Program Mode, IIRC), is anyone else seeing this?

If Ken Rockwell were in the least bit credible as a photographer or reviewer, there might be some interest. Maybe he can get one of his friends to set the camera up for him. Then we can also hear the amateur YouTuber wannabe gurus like Tony Northrup, SnapChick, Angry Tatoo Guy and FroKnows et al.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 01:23 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Retro1976: Ugh Nikon colors are terrible.

@Retro1976 Unfortunately, you are clueless. You aren't a pro shooting weddings, you don't have a studio and if you can't get good color, it's your lack of skill, both pre and post production. Every half skilled semi-pro here can get great color from most every Nikon, Canon, Sony etc. So, when you make remarks like this publicly, you're just showing that lack of skill and knowledge. I'd keep quiet especially when you have an empty profile, fake name, no location, empty gear list, empty free gallery and no links to any either.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 01:08 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: I've picked at Richard Butler and others over time at emphasizing what I consider to be "Best Buy, whiz bang, feature sets" for the non-working hipsters kits, but I'm going to give some kudos for this review. Not only was it pertinent, well written, and directed to real photographers, but his concerns seemed accurate and well thought out, more reminiscent of Phil Askey's best reviews, which I consider fine praise indeed. Keep it up Richard and thank you. The reviewer gets a *~~ Gold Award ~~* this time. Great wordsmith job, as well.

Continued..

Samsung was probably the worst, IMO. Canon, Nikon and Pentax, the best. Canon sometimes makes us drink a little Kool-Aid. Nikon and Pentax are more tools.

I appreciate that none of my upper grade cameras have so much as a Green Auto mode nor any kind of scene mode to get in the way. No Art Filters nor any kind of film simulation twaddle. No "Make Art" buttons. I believe this new D500 is also bereft of this nonsense, fortunately.

I'd rather pay money for my cameras which I use all day most days to make a living. I want a large comfortable grip, large bright optical viewfinder, great autofocus system, non-variant sensor, solid and fast frame rates, external tactile controls. Viewfinders are used to frame your photograph. The photographer decides what's framed and how to capture it. He/she brings it together in the digital darkroom.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 00:48 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: I've picked at Richard Butler and others over time at emphasizing what I consider to be "Best Buy, whiz bang, feature sets" for the non-working hipsters kits, but I'm going to give some kudos for this review. Not only was it pertinent, well written, and directed to real photographers, but his concerns seemed accurate and well thought out, more reminiscent of Phil Askey's best reviews, which I consider fine praise indeed. Keep it up Richard and thank you. The reviewer gets a *~~ Gold Award ~~* this time. Great wordsmith job, as well.

I'm referring to a lot of cameras made by the various home electronic giants and often marketed via the big box stores. They add features so the weekend warriors can argue who has the most features from some made up check list. I'm referring to various things like auto 2/shot HDR, Night Time Double shot, Artsy filters, Hipster Instagram treatments, Film simulators and all other forms of "Make Art" buttons and modes. I'm talking Auto Mode, Intelligent Auto, Smart Intelligent Auto and much more. Any form of scene modes from Sleepy Cat Portraits to Fireworks over Water scene modes. These and more tend to be Fisher Price camera wannabe tools which I think inhibits learning both our craft and art form. Also, this fits all the fashion accessory Leica wannabe or old SLR retro cameras.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 00:47 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1083 comments in total)

I've picked at Richard Butler and others over time at emphasizing what I consider to be "Best Buy, whiz bang, feature sets" for the non-working hipsters kits, but I'm going to give some kudos for this review. Not only was it pertinent, well written, and directed to real photographers, but his concerns seemed accurate and well thought out, more reminiscent of Phil Askey's best reviews, which I consider fine praise indeed. Keep it up Richard and thank you. The reviewer gets a *~~ Gold Award ~~* this time. Great wordsmith job, as well.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 20:25 UTC as 147th comment | 3 replies
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1984 comments in total)
In reply to:

abi170845: Wouldn't a person be more interested in buying quality lenses than a DSLR?

@instaxmurderer For starters, the two you name aren't very old. I still use a D700 every day in one of my studios and love it. I'm sure I'd be happy with a 5D MkII if I owned one, as well. But, you start backing up a whole lot more, and I think it's harder to maintain IQ sometimes. Then again, the same can be said for some glass over the years. What might have been acceptable, may no longer be.

In the more distant past, a Nikon lens was an all metal and glass design with no electrical contacts whatsoever. Very little to break down over the years. Same with camera bodies. The case is altered with either one these days. That's why I say the old cliche about the lens being more important doesn't always hold true and certainly not in the same way. But, you still get newbies telling other newbies, "Upgrade the glass before the Camera body" or "the lens is for a lifetime, but the body is short term. No longer true, if ever really was.

I say to upgrade knowledge and skills first. :-0

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 03:22 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1984 comments in total)
In reply to:

abi170845: Wouldn't a person be more interested in buying quality lenses than a DSLR?

@M1963 Lenses also come and go these days and often don't last any longer than camera bodies. Just in the past ten or twelve years there's been three 70-200 f/2.8 Nikkors and that doesn't consider a couple of 80-200 f/2.8 and one 70-200 f/4. People swap them as regularly as camera bodies.

Moreover, modern lenses also have built in computers and software the same as cameras. Many want to stay on top of the technological curve. The facts just don't bear out both of your suggestions. Just a cliche.

Nothing wrong with your advice, just that it's old advice and no longer is supported by what is actually happening in the marketplace, nor should it.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2016 at 13:40 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1984 comments in total)
In reply to:

abi170845: Wouldn't a person be more interested in buying quality lenses than a DSLR?

Such a typical remark. Why not buy quality lenses and a quality DSLR?

Back in the film days a camera body was a light tight box designed to mount the lens and hold the film flat. The idea was to spend considerably more on the glass because the body didn't contribute as much to the combination. Today the case is altered. A modern camera body can be your darkroom, your film, your computer, and so much more, contributing to the technical image quality. Today, one needs to pay attention to both the camera and the lens as well as many other factors.

Read the review to better understand this concept.

Link | Posted on May 14, 2016 at 21:42 UTC
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2136 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: Pardon me, but what's the point of a MILC if it still requires big lenses?

And speaking of native (cough) lenses...

@woodyggg Aww.. well, if English is your second language, I could try and rephrase it to make it more sensible to you, or you could explain the part you failed to understand. I'm happy to oblige. DPR also has a glossary of terms which can be helpful to a beginner. You can find a link to it at the bottom of the first page of the review.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2016 at 17:13 UTC
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2136 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: Pardon me, but what's the point of a MILC if it still requires big lenses?

And speaking of native (cough) lenses...

@junk1 I'm not comparing anything. I'm pointing out a mirrorless camera which is quite small and produces excellent image quality for its size. Though not quite as small, Nikon's new DL line looks to be very nice mirrorless cameras as well. Besides, I'd bet more than half of the a6000 and maybe also the a6300 buyers will never add to the kit lens which comes with the camera. A smaller mirrorless camera like whatever has replaced that Canon S95 might serve them better and its 1/1.7 inch sensor wasn't as small as many compact mirrorless cameras use. Being able to travel in your top shirt pocket is a great feature.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2016 at 01:29 UTC
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2136 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: Pardon me, but what's the point of a MILC if it still requires big lenses?

And speaking of native (cough) lenses...

They make small mirrorless cameras without interchangeable lenses. I had a nice Canon S95 at one point. It was small enough to fit in your shirt pocket. The new Nikon DL lines look good too.

Personally for all day use, I'd rather have a more advanced design with a reflex mirror. If they are just going to enlarge an old fashion point and shoot without the mirror technology and add interchangeable lenses, they had better get the price more in line with those older designs. After all, they don't have to pay for a precision reflex mirror or optical glass pentaprism viewfinder.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2016 at 18:09 UTC
On article Retro through-and-through: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review (2481 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: Yeah, dump the typical DSLR for a Nikon DF or Fuji XPro2 et al. I can wear it with my Faux Giorgio Armani Hong Kong suit and a Bolex wrist watch and really impress the ladies. Hubba hubba! What you wear is more important than the photographs you make. Give me that retro look.

@Mac McCreery Nice to meet you Mr. Nikon. I'm Craig. Lang may yer lum reek. Haste Ye Back! Whit’s fur ye’ll no go past ye.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2016 at 15:15 UTC
Total: 366, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »