vFunct

Lives in Canada Canada
Works as a Working class
Joined on Mar 14, 2004

Comments

Total: 570, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Confirmed: Bowens is going out of business (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

RoelHendrickx: Here is a simple equation.
With ISO performance of sensors improving, more and more photographers prefer to work with naturally available light, whenever at all possible.
(I know I am one of those, and I don't even use stupidly high ISO values. I do recognize that studio lighting or competently used flash can bring something special to images, but I do also prefer, generally, the look of natural light, when appropriate, with a few reflectors.)
In any case, companies specializing in lighting equipment were bound to suffer.
Tripod manufacturers probably also feel the heat.

Professional photos, like Apple product images, need very controlled artificial lighting. Every reflection and highlight is designed into the photography.

Natural lighting is unusable for these photos.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2017 at 01:01 UTC

"Good against remotes is one thing.. good against the living, it's something else"

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 22:17 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

vFunct: Photography isn't the act of pressing the shutter button on a camera. It's the ENTIRE production of a photo, including location scouting, camera selection and setting, production travel, image post-processing, styling, makeup, lighting, timing, publishing, marketing, and so on.

Saying the monkey owns the copyright shows that people have NO understanding of what a photographer actually does. In fact, lots of photographers let their first assistant take the photos, and they don't even operate the camera.

So, yah, Slater owns the copyright, since he was responsible for the production of the image, including setting the camera so that the monkey could activate the shutter.

The only people that think the monkey should own the copyright are the most basic amateurs, who thinks photography is operating a camera instead of producing a final photo, and who have never produced a photograph with a team of people that each contribute their own creative ideas.

@marchman It's because no one thinks operating a camera gives you a right to authorship, since everyone in the industry knows that photography isn't operating a camera, but producing a final product.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 18:06 UTC
In reply to:

vFunct: Photography isn't the act of pressing the shutter button on a camera. It's the ENTIRE production of a photo, including location scouting, camera selection and setting, production travel, image post-processing, styling, makeup, lighting, timing, publishing, marketing, and so on.

Saying the monkey owns the copyright shows that people have NO understanding of what a photographer actually does. In fact, lots of photographers let their first assistant take the photos, and they don't even operate the camera.

So, yah, Slater owns the copyright, since he was responsible for the production of the image, including setting the camera so that the monkey could activate the shutter.

The only people that think the monkey should own the copyright are the most basic amateurs, who thinks photography is operating a camera instead of producing a final photo, and who have never produced a photograph with a team of people that each contribute their own creative ideas.

In the real world, first assistants shoot for the photographer without employment contracts.

And they don't own the copyright.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 05:36 UTC

Photography isn't the act of pressing the shutter button on a camera. It's the ENTIRE production of a photo, including location scouting, camera selection and setting, production travel, image post-processing, styling, makeup, lighting, timing, publishing, marketing, and so on.

Saying the monkey owns the copyright shows that people have NO understanding of what a photographer actually does. In fact, lots of photographers let their first assistant take the photos, and they don't even operate the camera.

So, yah, Slater owns the copyright, since he was responsible for the production of the image, including setting the camera so that the monkey could activate the shutter.

The only people that think the monkey should own the copyright are the most basic amateurs, who thinks photography is operating a camera instead of producing a final photo, and who have never produced a photograph with a team of people that each contribute their own creative ideas.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 02:32 UTC as 141st comment | 9 replies

What's the response latency of the pen?

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 02:19 UTC as 9th comment
On article SainSonic launches 50mm F1.1 lens for APS-C cameras (243 comments in total)

lol digital image sensors don't accept apertures larger than F/1.2

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 19:43 UTC as 48th comment | 15 replies
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

So, does that mean Getty and AP also doesn't care about quality, and that they don't pay money either, because they also want photos turned around fast?

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 19:37 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

We've actually been looking for wedding photographers that can turn around photos immediately.

This is the world now. Wedding guests want photos to post immediately to social media. Those photos are useless 4 months later.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 14:49 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

Instant editing is a skill you need to develop over time. You CAN do it, though.

Overthinking your edit is a real problem. Don't overthink your edit.

My recommendation on the best way to learn this skill is to actually sign up for a wire service, and practice practice practice live event shooting.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 00:34 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

If you look at any red-carpet event, they're posting pictures to wire services within a few minutes.

Your out-of-camera images are good enough for reception parties. The staged portraits is where you will retouch. You aren't going to retouch the wedding reception party photos, so you're should deliver them immediately.

It's stupid to retouch party photos.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 00:29 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

You've obviously never done mass events, like Fashion week, where you may have dozens of events to go to PER DAY, and you need to be able to deliver those images within minutes.

Learn to make sure your photos are deliverable at the camera. The people need the images immediately to post to social media. They don't want to way days for it.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2017 at 23:44 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

Of course you're not going to individually retouch images with this workflow, so those images I recommend you edit and send to your retoucher.

Which leads me to tip #2: Always have an Asian retoucher.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2017 at 21:11 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

Editing does NOT take a few days. A good editor should be able to edit through hundreds of images per hour. Even a single-person photographer can at least do this nightly. A two person team can do this within the hour.

This is what AP & Reuters and other wire-service photographers do.

I just did a wedding this weekend and delivered hundreds of Raw photos nightly.

It really is a skill that you have to develop, though. When I first started photography, I definitely could not edit as quickly, taking too long to consider each photo, but doing wire work definitely taught me how to go through photos quickly.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2017 at 21:02 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)

Wedding Photographers: PLEASE learn to deliver your photos WITHIN THE HOUR of the wedding event. These days, weddings are designed for social media. Your photos are going to be useless 4 months after the event, when a million people with cell phones already posted pictures of the event.

The sports, fashion, and celebrity industries learned to post event photos immediately. The wedding industry needs to learn to do the same.

You absolutely need to be able to learn to edit quickly - to cut down 3000 photos down to 500, and to grade quickly - adjust exposure, color-correct, etc.

Have a workstation at the event with an editor on hand, with your cameras connected to it via wi-fi, have Google Drive or iCloud photo sharing enabled.

You'll thank me for this, because now you won't have a backlog of post-processing work to do.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2017 at 07:48 UTC as 11th comment | 18 replies
On article Sony a9 banding issue: fact or fiction? (733 comments in total)
In reply to:

vFunct: Hahah Sony SUCKS! HAHA!

I kid I kid.

The vast majority of people that would face this issue would be event photojournalists. You're not going to face this in studio situations. So if you're shooting events, there's NO way a photo editor at your client newspaper or blog is going to go "Oh look there's some slight banding, we're going to have to reject you."

Sorry, but news photo editors don't care about this level of detail. They won't even notice it.

I mean, you have professional TV sports broadcast that have all sorts of flicker when they show LED screens, they don't give a crap about it either.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 04:40 UTC
On article Sony a9 banding issue: fact or fiction? (733 comments in total)

Hahah Sony SUCKS! HAHA!

I kid I kid.

The vast majority of people that would face this issue would be event photojournalists. You're not going to face this in studio situations. So if you're shooting events, there's NO way a photo editor at your client newspaper or blog is going to go "Oh look there's some slight banding, we're going to have to reject you."

Sorry, but news photo editors don't care about this level of detail. They won't even notice it.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 04:38 UTC as 120th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

DavidNJ100: This isn't that inexpensive. Why would you buy it over a Nikon D750 or A7ii unless it was a matter of existing investment in lenses, flashes, and accessories?

Is this really in the D810 class? I thought this was their bare-bones entry level D610 class..

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 04:19 UTC

Weird that a new general-purpose consumer-level camera wouldn't do 4k video these days.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 04:15 UTC as 68th comment | 2 replies
On article Finishing the line: Nikon 28mm F1.4E ED sample gallery (128 comments in total)

This lens by itself is a good enough reason to sell your other cameras and lenses just to get this with a Nikon full-frame camera. It's at a very useful focal length - 28mm is standard for cell phones - and has some of the finest bokeh of any lens.

It should be the default lens of any photographer. Other camera & lens manufacturers are garbage compared to this Nikon setup, and I'm glad Nikon exists for REAL photographers out there, who knows that the focus is about art instead of math.

If you are trying to measure this lens's quality, you have already failed.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2017 at 14:15 UTC as 25th comment | 4 replies
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