SteB

SteB

Lives in United Kingdom North Shropshire, United Kingdom
Joined on Apr 3, 2007

Comments

Total: 355, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

trungtran: Really should replace Wildlife with Animal

There is a category for plants and fungi, and none animal photographs could hypothetically win the contest.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2019 at 13:34 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: When looking at those photos, some seem too good to be (entirely) true. This is my list: 2, 4, 7, 10, 13. Not to say that all or any of them are fake. But I feel that at least some of them might have had some help in post process.

Below is a link to the rules. Essentially the principle rule is that certain types of processing "are permitted providing that they comply with the Competition’s principles of authenticity so that they do not deceive the viewer or misrepresent the reality of nature." Other types of processing such as cloning out or cloning in features, painting of backgrounds etc, are not allowed.
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy/competition/adult-competition/rules.html

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2019 at 13:32 UTC
In reply to:

Terrible Photographer: Ya'lls need to specify which wildlife competition in the title. I swear we've had 4 of these articles already. Is this THE Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition? Or really just one of thousands?

There's a direct link in the article to web page about the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, and if you look at the about page this is clearly the original international competition of that title.
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy/about.html

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2019 at 13:19 UTC
In reply to:

Stigg: I find it interesting and satisfying that the best wildlife and nature photography was achieved on film decades ago and is available for free as old discarded library books. With all of the extreme equipment used in recent years, the concentration of those behind the lens is directed only to attempts at catching the eye of the viewer rather than articulating a story. At 20fps it becomes an exercise in choosing the most attention-grabbing image that is more of a representation of what the equipment can do than understanding the subject matter.

This is absolute nonsense and just plain old trolling. There was some excellent wildlife and nature photography on film. However, look through any book or magazine containing wildlife and nature photography from 30-40 years ago and you will also see many poor quality images that would never get published now.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2019 at 13:15 UTC
On article What the Z50 tells us about Nikon's APS-C strategy (677 comments in total)

Amongst all this scratching of heads about APS-C, why not FF, let me once again re-iterate why crop sensor cameras make sense for nature photography. There are 2 main types of nature photography where crop sensors are advantageous, and that's for reach with longer lenses i.e. bird and wildlife photography, and magnification in macro photography. Here you often have the limitation of how close you are to the subject, and with larger formats you inevitable end up cropping, often a lot. There really is a lot of confusion. Often I see nature photographers using FF cameras, and quite literally, nearly every photo they take is cropped to APS-C or less.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2019 at 13:22 UTC as 93rd comment | 1 reply

I find this line up of Sony APS-C cameras very frustrating. I'm very interested in Sony's 200-600mm zoom as it looks the perfect wildlife lens for my style of photography. A Sony 7r mkIV looks good, but I couldn't really afford it or rather justify it, because if did get one, I'd mostly use it in crop mode. In other words I'd be much better of with a crop camera for the time of being (I currently use a 7D mkII and 100-400mm mkII). I'd have some use for a high resolution FF camera, but not most of time. So it's a lot extra to pay for features I'd only occasionally use.

None of Sony's current line up of APS-C cameras area ideal. The A6600 may have a bigger battery, IBIS etc, but other than that it seems to have little over the A6400 - the same EVF, same 1/4000th shutter, with the same low flash synch speed. I cannot understand why Sony has produced so many camera models that are only slightly different than each other.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2019 at 14:13 UTC as 57th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

SteB: I think the most interesting thing will be how that 32.5MP APS-C sensor performs i.e. its dynamic range and high ISO performance.

Thanks, I didnt realise the latest version of ACR would open them.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2019 at 15:06 UTC

I think the most interesting thing will be how that 32.5MP APS-C sensor performs i.e. its dynamic range and high ISO performance.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2019 at 12:26 UTC as 245th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

huyzer: Testing the waters to see how greedy they can be.

That's how I see it.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2019 at 08:35 UTC

Overall, this gives me no confidence in Adobe. Forgetting the specifics, it does appear as if Adobe are likely to try ramping up the amount photographers pay per month. I suspect like many photographers I don't use 98% of the features of Photoshop. I do minimal PP to images, mainly adjusting tonal ranges for difficult lighting, noise removal, sharpening, with plugins. Also I don't use cloud storage, for the very reason I don't want to become reliant on something where the proprietors suddenly hold you to ransom and start ramping up the prices. It's a long time since I've tried Capture One Pro, but I suppose I've have to check it out now as I just don't like the smell of this whole thing at all. As I said before, this is a common wheeze used by large monopolies, and that is to get you reliant on something, and then to incrementally increase the price you have to pay for it.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2019 at 08:33 UTC as 166th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

SteB: It's a very worrying but familiar pattern. Get people reliant on a product and service, and then start to raise the prices by supposedly offering an enhanced product and service, eventually in a non-optional way. It was my worry about this being offered by subscription.

It's a form of shifting baseline type thing, in that Adobe hope to get customers used to paying more, and then it will be some new service at 30 a month, and then eventually 40 a month. It's the big problem with monopolies. It's all very cynical, offering an image catalogue, and cloud storage people become reliant on and into, then slowly squeezing them for more money if they don't want to have to completely re-catalogue their images with another programme.

Name one?

Link | Posted on May 2, 2019 at 22:09 UTC

It's a very worrying but familiar pattern. Get people reliant on a product and service, and then start to raise the prices by supposedly offering an enhanced product and service, eventually in a non-optional way. It was my worry about this being offered by subscription.

It's a form of shifting baseline type thing, in that Adobe hope to get customers used to paying more, and then it will be some new service at 30 a month, and then eventually 40 a month. It's the big problem with monopolies. It's all very cynical, offering an image catalogue, and cloud storage people become reliant on and into, then slowly squeezing them for more money if they don't want to have to completely re-catalogue their images with another programme.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2019 at 21:12 UTC as 262nd comment | 5 replies

I would have thought that getting critical focus with this lens on a DSLR wide open is going to be very hit and miss, which makes you wonder what the point of it is.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2019 at 23:41 UTC as 48th comment | 5 replies

I find it disappointing that there is this simplistic attitude expressed by Sony that APS-C is for amateurs, and FF is for professionals.

As I keep explaining it is nowhere near as simple as that. A lot of people use APS-C for reach. These include wildlife and nature photographers. Nor is it just for long telephoto use. For field macro photography, 1:1 on FF does not produce the frame filling power of 1:1 on APS-C or m4/3 come to that.

If format size was all about professionalism, all pros would use medium format, and FF would never have existed, because no pros would ever have used 35mm film, which is the dimensions for FF digital.

The thing is that now FF digital has been our for some time is that you can get a FF digital camera for less than you can get some crop frame cameras.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:53 UTC as 104th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Dr_J: I feel that we won't see an APS-C R system from Canon and RP shows that they will commit to FF only.

Those who have EF lenses will be able to keep them for a while, before they switch to RF.

Those who use APS-C bodies with a bunch of EF-S lenses can't expect Canon to sell them more for their system in the future. They would have to sell the camera and all EF-S lenses and switch to R. But then since they're selling all the gear anyway, why stay with Canon?

I think there will be a need for a RF mount 7D mkII type body. There's a certain set of professional and advanced enthusiast who needs the maximum reach possible. This includes wildlife photographers, sports photographers, press photographers etc. These are the users of long expensive telephoto lenses, where with FF they would always be cropping to less than APS-C. Whilst in theory high resolution FF cameras allow similar per pixel photos to be created, it means handling huge files and not having the same frame rate. This type of photographer needs their crop sensor body to be immediately interchangeable with their FF body. This is going to be especially the case once Canon introduce long expensive telephotos for the RF system.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2019 at 21:20 UTC

I'm still very sceptical that Canon is further developing it's DSLR line. It makes no sense. Once the currently announced RF lenses are available, and other RF lenses, all Canon's most up to date professional lenses, with the exception of the long white lenses will be RF mount, and therefore not usable on DSLRs. This points to Canon expecting that it's professional base will be turning to the RF mount.

I'm sure that Canon will be producing DSLRs and supporting this line for quite some time. It's also likely that new DSLRs which have already been largely developed will appear. Maybe even a few lenses. However, whilst Canon will never officially announce the end of the EF mount system, I cannot see them investing any more in longer term R&D of the EF mount system.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2019 at 21:11 UTC as 20th comment | 6 replies

I know the group of users I belong to may not be the biggest, but it is still a large group of APS-C users, and again we are not given any mention in articles like this. This group are nature photographers, both macro and long lens users. Here, crop sensors are not a disadvantage, but a positive advantage. As someone who was using 35mm film for 20 year prior to affordable digital, crop sensors were a revelation.

On FF/35mm film a 300mm/400mm prime or zoom is not that long, and is sort of the minimum for birds. Whereas on a crop sensor, these lenses have serious reach (400m on Canon APS-C is 460mm eqv). Likewise 1:1 macro on FF means you can't fill the frame with an average sized fly or bee, without addons for more magnification, but can on a crop sensor. This is a huge advantage to enthusiasts, and even pros take advantage of the crop sensor extra reach. Use the same lenses on FF and you end up cropping to APS-C size or smaller, regularly.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2019 at 20:05 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

HosseinG: Four of these lenses have IS, it means that Canon will not have an R series with IBIS.

Not exactly, given that other manufacturers are producing IS lenses which synch with the IBIS in their cameras. In other words I don't think it's any guide as to the likelihood of IBIS in R cameras. I strongly suspect Canon is actually aiming for IBIS as so many reviewers treat the lack of it as a con in their pros and cons.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2019 at 10:06 UTC

It's a pity there aren't more details, as essentially we learned no more than from the leaked photos. For instance there's a question of whether that short stubby 70-200mm f2.8 L is an extending zoom, or a fixed length zoom. If it's an extender then it is a significant change in direction from the design of zooms of this focal length range and aperture? Whereas if it is a fixed length zoom there's some special lens design magic going on.

Really I'm more interested in the rumoured macro lens in the 100mm region (I like my current 100mm L, except for the bokeh fringing) and that patent for the 100-400mm. I'd also love to know if Canon are going to produce something like a 500mm f5.6 DO, in response to Nikon's PF version. That's the sort of lens I'd love. Even if I could afford a 500mm f4, I don't think I'd want to carry it around all day.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2019 at 10:03 UTC as 26th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

worldaccordingtojim: As a Sony user I love seeing things like this, this will drive the market to a new standard. The EOS R on the other hand is a complete loss as most people expected. After the d850, if nothing else Nikon is putting 100% into their cameras. Full frame 4k, IBIS, great build quality, and decent AF. Bring on the competition, can't wait to see the next Sonys.

@Mared - Canon just announced the lenses it was obvious were coming. Fact check.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2019 at 07:11 UTC
Total: 355, showing: 41 – 60
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