SteB

SteB

Lives in United Kingdom North Shropshire, United Kingdom
Joined on Apr 3, 2007

Comments

Total: 355, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Hands-on with the Canon RF 14-35mm F4 L IS USM (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

D135ima: Canon RF lenses now so expensive !
Ок, i get it - this is not just some 16-35 4. This is 14-35 4, it small and lightweight, with great magnification, and with awesome stabilization if you use it on IBIS body, it justifies its price with all this features, kinda... But still we have this price.
Like a canon user i see the problem or a trend, that Canon just doesn't want to release mid-range lenses. They'd rather add couple "unique characteristics" and raise the price.
Same thing with 100 2.8 macro.
Same with 70-200 4
Same with L primes.
Only place to find balanced lenses on RF mount is EF line. Even if you forget about tamron and sigma lenses available on E mount, Sony line up still looks more balansed. Even Panasonic now have 1.8 primes with sealing and great build quality for 500-600 bucks. Even Panasonic now is more down to earth than Canon - it's just ridiculous !

Totally agree. Even if I was to eventually get a Canon R body, I really would struggle to justify getting one of these lenses, considering I've already got lenses that will do the same job. This sort of price for an f4 wide angle zoom is just ridiculous, even if it is theoretically better than others.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2021 at 12:15 UTC

Looks like my Mindshift Exposure 15 bag has been discontinued. Not sure why as it has just about being the perfect outdoor shoulder bag. As I often cycle to locations, a shoulder bag suits me better than a back pack. Super attention to detail with a waterproof tarpaulin base and sail cloth top cover, and a superb all weather cover. The strap is not perfect. Camera shoulder straps like the Peak Design slide tend to hook under the adjustment straps and the padded bit could do with being a bit wider, but getting a new strap is easy.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2021 at 10:13 UTC as 26th comment

As a long time macro photographer I am a bit worried about the prevalence of two insects facing each other on a flower or grass head cliche, winning so many competitions or being highly placed. It makes a very striking image but the chance of finding 2 insects resting like this early morning, perfectly aligned on the same plane of focus, is infinitesimally small. I have never found it once by chance, ever, and I've been taking macro photographs and going out early morning for nearly 40 years.

It is possible to manipulate insects when they are at rest early morning, and even transfer them from one perch to another. I am not criticising this, because wrangling invertebrates in various ways is part of the whole skill set. What I am questioning is this striking cliche winning so many competitions, because it is hardly a new or original idea.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2021 at 08:25 UTC as 3rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

ukaskew37: The weevil photo is fantastic, but I'm struggling to understand how all 3 elements (two weevils and the full plant) are in sharp focus, seemingly with no fall-off, given it was f13 with an ultra-macro and apparently no stacking etc.

I think the clue is in the image description "it took me a long time to be successful and produce this work. Almost certainly this is some type of studio set up, in which it would have been repeated over and over. The famous pioneer of this type of photograph, Stephen Dalton, who was taking this type of photograph from the 1960s onwards, used studio set ups, and used hundreds of rolls of film to produce one image.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2021 at 08:16 UTC
In reply to:

tt321: Does "of the year" mean that the photos have to have been taken in the past year? I've seen the damselfly with one eye on each side of a stalk (maybe not this very photo) certainly from some years ago. It's not a new idea.

If you approach a damselfly at rest early in the morning, when they are too cold to fly, their standard behaviour is to go around the back of the stem like this. This is why you see so many photographs like this.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2021 at 08:10 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Best shooting positions (88 comments in total)

There's one more method, which is both incredibly stable and simple (I use it for macro - but it can be used for any style). You need a pole, a walking pole, a stick (I often use a bamboo cane) or a monopod. You put your left hand on the pole or stick at the height your camera is going to be. You then rest the end of the lens or lenshood on your left hand and brace your camera, preferably with the rubber eye piece surround braced on your eyebrow. It is much more versatile than a monopod used conventionally, as you can rapidly adjust your left hand to the exact height you want. It completely eliminates up and down movement. Your photos will be much sharper.

I adapted it from Brian Valentine's (LordV) metal beanpole method. But Brian's method shows him holding his flash bracket against the pole. However, I often use it with no flash. If your lens is longish, it's important for maximum stability to rest the end of the lens on your left hand, not the base of the lens.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2021 at 10:55 UTC as 19th comment

It's interesting that Canon are not saying this a 1Dx replacement and are designating it the R3, perhaps because of the eye AF, but also to leave the top line open. I'd have thought the most likely explanation for this is that Canon knows there's technology in the pipeline, which could enable a jump forward in technology, and they wouldn't want to replace their top level camera within just a couple of years or so.

If I was to hazard a guess this would be entirely dispensing with the shutter, perhaps with some sort of global shutter sensor.

With this strategy it would allow them to introduce a new top line camera if new technology becomes available and viable, but without having to replace the R3. Whereas if they'd introduced this as their top line camera, they might have had to replace it, leaving buyers of expensive cameras wondering how long it would be before their very expensive camera became obsolete.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2021 at 14:36 UTC as 16th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

SteB: Very interesting, especially given that Sony chose to maintain a similar body shape to its other FF mirrorless cameras.

I'm a Canon user, but I believe it's good to have alternatives. I probably won't be using this class of camera, but you never know. I'm interested to see the Canon version. Again, not so much because I will probably get or use this level of camera, but because this class of camera usually has a long product life, it will give a good impression of where cameras will be at over the next 5 years.

I agree that it will probably use Sony's A1 sensor or similar given what we know. It will be interesting to see if Canon goes with something similar i.e. a 50mp stacked sensor, or something different.

@photograph_lover - Oh dear Canon have just announced the development of the R3 with a stacked CMOS sensor, just like I said was likely. It predictably turns out that you had no idea what you were talking about.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2021 at 14:06 UTC

$1400 for a 100mm macro lens. Canon has a sense of humour. I've got the 100mm f2.8 L IS, along with a whole bunch of other macro lenses for my Canon system. Okay, I haven't got into the R system yet, but I eventually will. However, it is a bit absurd that 100mm macro lenses are so big and expensive. It's really difficult to see what extra this macro lens brings to the table which the others don't have. The 1.4x magnification is useful but 2x magnification would be more useful, and the Laowa lens shows it is possible. Even when I get an R camera, I think I'd just get the Laowa 100mm and use the 100mm f2.8 L IS if I need AF.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2021 at 14:02 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

SteB: Very interesting, especially given that Sony chose to maintain a similar body shape to its other FF mirrorless cameras.

I'm a Canon user, but I believe it's good to have alternatives. I probably won't be using this class of camera, but you never know. I'm interested to see the Canon version. Again, not so much because I will probably get or use this level of camera, but because this class of camera usually has a long product life, it will give a good impression of where cameras will be at over the next 5 years.

I agree that it will probably use Sony's A1 sensor or similar given what we know. It will be interesting to see if Canon goes with something similar i.e. a 50mp stacked sensor, or something different.

@photography-lover - I think you ought to acquaint yourself with basic logic, reasoning and especially logical fallacies. I didn't say 8k requires a stacked sensor, you did. What you did is called the straw man logical fallacy.

Here's a Canon stacked sensor patent. If you didn't know about Canon's patents, and there are other ones, then your opinions about this are meaningless.
https://www.canonnews.com/canon-patent-application-high-speed-stacked-sensor

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2021 at 13:31 UTC
In reply to:

SteB: Very interesting, especially given that Sony chose to maintain a similar body shape to its other FF mirrorless cameras.

I'm a Canon user, but I believe it's good to have alternatives. I probably won't be using this class of camera, but you never know. I'm interested to see the Canon version. Again, not so much because I will probably get or use this level of camera, but because this class of camera usually has a long product life, it will give a good impression of where cameras will be at over the next 5 years.

I agree that it will probably use Sony's A1 sensor or similar given what we know. It will be interesting to see if Canon goes with something similar i.e. a 50mp stacked sensor, or something different.

@photography-lover

You "there is no indication that Canon has a competitor in the works nor that they have access to a stacked sensor".

Well Canon has multiple patents for stacked sensors. If that it not an indication I don't know what is. Canon brought out a camera with 8k video before Sony, and all the test.

Most reviews agree that the new Canon sensors are close in performance to the rivals. So this is just pure trolling.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2021 at 16:39 UTC

Very interesting, especially given that Sony chose to maintain a similar body shape to its other FF mirrorless cameras.

I'm a Canon user, but I believe it's good to have alternatives. I probably won't be using this class of camera, but you never know. I'm interested to see the Canon version. Again, not so much because I will probably get or use this level of camera, but because this class of camera usually has a long product life, it will give a good impression of where cameras will be at over the next 5 years.

I agree that it will probably use Sony's A1 sensor or similar given what we know. It will be interesting to see if Canon goes with something similar i.e. a 50mp stacked sensor, or something different.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2021 at 18:19 UTC as 151st comment | 8 replies

The lack of a focus window on an internal focus macro lens is a big mistake. Anyone who photographs small creatures in the field with a macro lens, needs to know roughly where the lens is focused without looking in the viewfinder. With an internal focus lens, you have no indication of where the lens is focused. Putting the camera to your eye to either focus the lens or see an in viewfinder focus scale, will often result in you losing track of the subject.

I just wish that Camera and lens manufacturers would just consult with macro photographers, before designing equipment. So much macro equipment has basic design flaws which could have been avoided, if only the manufacturer had taken the trouble to simply talk to some experienced macro photographers.

Link | Posted on Oct 1, 2020 at 02:51 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

rationalist: The question for me is: What does a „magnification range between 1x and 5x“ mean? Magnification with respect to what? To sensor size? Which sensor then (M43, APSC, FF)? Even in microscopy it is a very bad habit to characterize images by „magnification“ though unfortunately still very common…

Really it is shorthand for reproduction ratio, which is the ratio of the subject size filling the frame to the sensor size. It's an important figure because it is used in lots of exposure calculations, which needed to be used in the old film days, when there was no instant preview of through the lens metering. For instance this was especially important when most flashes weren't measured through the lens. So when you added extension tubes or focused closer with a macro lens, you would have to calculate how much extra power you needed from the flash, even if you were using a handheld flash meter.

Yes, with sensor/film size differences, it means the size of the subject filling the frame at 1:1 varies, but as regards calculations, the ratios remain constant.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2020 at 11:26 UTC

I think the reason for the YouTube focus on this, and that is because by their very nature, YouTube image channels shoot lots of extended footage.

Those who shoot extended footage with stills orientated interchangeable lens cameras are are relatively small proportion of users of this type of camera. In other words they are filmmakers, videographers, wedding photographers and people shooting corporate events. Most other users are going to shoot much shorter video clips.

The most obvious failing Canon don't seem to thought about is the cumulative shooting problem and the long recovery period.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2020 at 12:12 UTC as 73rd comment | 10 replies

This is very sad. I was a long time OM 35mm film user and then 4/3 Olympus user. In fact I still have an E-1. I never made the transition to m4/3 although I long considered it and use Canon.

Those going on about it is Olympus's fault for choosing a tiny sensor, not going FF etc, you're entirely mistaken. Firstly, in real terms the 4/3 sensor isn't that much smaller than APS-C. What is more Nikon haven't being doing well, and Pentax hardly made the big time with their FF camera. Even if Olympus had produced a FF system they wouldn't have done any better.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2020 at 16:41 UTC as 400th comment | 8 replies

I think the earlier comment I made on both this article and the one on the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak in China and it's relevance to photographic equipment and supply will now be clear. My point was that as regards supply of cameras etc, it was wrong to see this as a China problem, because the effect on other countries would be much greater. Japan has just declared a state of emergency. It will no longer be the supply of parts to Japanese companies or their manufacturing plants in China, which will be the main problem, but the epidemic in Japan itself, and in the US and Europe etc, and the effects on the supply of photographic equipment. There will be massive economic and trade effects for many years to come. I don't claim to have a crystal ball, only to know that the impacts will be big.
https://www.dpreview.com/opinion/2724812436/the-world-is-ending-why-are-you-still-writing-about-cameras?comment=1277121744

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2020 at 16:19 UTC as 19th comment
In reply to:

SteB: 2 weeks ago I made this comment in response to the article about shortages because of the situation in China.

"The whole premise of this article is fallacious. This premise is that this is a Chinese problem. Yet most experts say this will be a global outbreak. It won't be the shortage of Chinese components which will be the problem, it will be that manufacturing and transport will close down everywhere, and not just in China. There will be a far bigger problem outside China than within it."
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/8598995705/coronavirus-what-effect-will-covid-19-have-on-the-photo-industry?comment=5826091536

COVID-19 infections in China are down to a handful in a day. The rest of the world is going on lockdown with a global pandemic. My speciality is understanding complexity, but I am still interest in photography.

@Ron Poelman and @ Chris59 - Yes, the world health organization WHO has been monitoring the situation in China. We can be quite certain that China has vastly reducing infections, because we'd know about it if they hadn't.

You need to understand exponential growth, which means doubling of cases in decreasing increments. Probably several days here. They had 80,000 cases. If it had carried on doubling like this it would be many millions. Impossible to hide. What is more we know very well this strategy recommended by and overseen by WHO works, because in South Korea, Hong Kong and Singapore, which have much more open access to the outside world and which had early infections, similar reductions have been seen. In China they have gone down to one new case per day. Not death, new infections. What is more the Chinese authorities have the highest number of tests by a long way.

I was personally very sceptical at first, and do not trust the Chinese government at all, but this is real.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2020 at 21:51 UTC

2 weeks ago I made this comment in response to the article about shortages because of the situation in China.

"The whole premise of this article is fallacious. This premise is that this is a Chinese problem. Yet most experts say this will be a global outbreak. It won't be the shortage of Chinese components which will be the problem, it will be that manufacturing and transport will close down everywhere, and not just in China. There will be a far bigger problem outside China than within it."
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/8598995705/coronavirus-what-effect-will-covid-19-have-on-the-photo-industry?comment=5826091536

COVID-19 infections in China are down to a handful in a day. The rest of the world is going on lockdown with a global pandemic. My speciality is understanding complexity, but I am still interest in photography.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2020 at 22:24 UTC as 127th comment | 3 replies

Good article, and at last some realism.

"And we'd guess at a price tag around the $3500 territory that EOS 5D models have been launched at."

This is what I've guessed at. A 5D like price, for a camera aimed at the same niche. There's been a lot guessing at ridiculous prices because of the mention of 8K video. However, actual 8K output is likely to be of limited appeal to the buyer of this class of camera, but oversampled 4K footage from 8K would be something that far more of the buyers of this class of camera would appreciate.

Canon has made it clear that it's aim is to make up for lost ground in the FF mirrorless sector and to achieve this aim Canon need 2 main features to be competitive. Specifications at least as good as rivals and preferably better, along with a price, competitive with rivals. If Canon were to price it well above competitors, and this means also equivalent FF DSLRs, it would limit the market domination Canon is aiming for.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2020 at 18:00 UTC as 84th comment | 1 reply
Total: 355, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »